9 episodes

Comedian Samantha Baines celebrates amazing women in history with awesome modern-day women and non-binary peeps. Each episode features incredible guests joining Sam to share their achievements and experiences and talk about the heroines that inspired them to succeed. From topics serious to silly, subscribe for your weekly, no holds-barred chat between awesome wo-men (which are the same as men, just with a little more 'wooo') every Thursday.
Follow us on @periodspodcast
Subscribe @acast
And find out how to get in touch at podcastpioneers.com
Listen on iTunes & Acast

Periods Amazing Women in History Podcast Pioneers

    • Society & Culture

Comedian Samantha Baines celebrates amazing women in history with awesome modern-day women and non-binary peeps. Each episode features incredible guests joining Sam to share their achievements and experiences and talk about the heroines that inspired them to succeed. From topics serious to silly, subscribe for your weekly, no holds-barred chat between awesome wo-men (which are the same as men, just with a little more 'wooo') every Thursday.
Follow us on @periodspodcast
Subscribe @acast
And find out how to get in touch at podcastpioneers.com
Listen on iTunes & Acast

    Periods are back! Season 2: Laura Whitmore

    Periods are back! Season 2: Laura Whitmore

    Comedian and actor Samantha Baines is back with a brand new series. Today she's chatting with TV presenter Laura Whitmore and finding out about her inspiring woman from history.


    “Feel empowered and if you start to do it, if you start to feel your voice heard, you will never go back”
    Mary Robinson


    Laura talks about her first experience of Twitter trolls, gambolling in Edinburgh with Sam and their magical network of mutual pals.


    Laura talks about her work with the global children’s charity Plan and how her mum inspired her to use her TV profile as a platform to start important conversations.


    She’s picked Mary Robinson, Ireland’s first female president and a former UN High Commissioner, as her amazing woman from history.


    Laura talks about how this woman inspired her as a young girl, opened her eyes to women in power and was a model for emotion and compassion, as well as rocking some pretty amazing suits and. shoulder pads.


    Laura explains how she got to interview her hero recently (and talk music!) before telling us how Robinson swapped the church for law, before embarking on an impressive political career.


    You can follow Laura on social media @thewhitmore


    And you can find out more about Mary Robinson’s climate change podcast 'Mothers of Invention’ here:
    https://www.mothersofinvention.online
     
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    • 25 min
    Kicking down doors and finding open ones with @emilylloydsaini

    Kicking down doors and finding open ones with @emilylloydsaini

    Sam’s joined by fellow actor, comedian, broadcaster and general career twin Emily Lloyd-Saini.


    "In the line of work we do there are a lot of doors that feel locked sometimes. Find another one."


    Emily’s about to appear in Horrible Histories, Catastrophe and presents on the BBC Asian Network on the Mawaan and Emily Show. Emily presents the story of Chilean pilot Margo Duhalde.


    "Men were convinced they were the ones who could do things. They always looked down on us women and it’s only recently they’re beginning to realise we’re equal and sometimes actually better than them" (Margot Duhalde, 2017)


    Emily explains how she and Samantha met when she was MCing the Funny Women competition and the advice she’d give her teenage self before getting meaningful about favourite movies.


    They chat about making it in acting and comedy, their ideal roles and the increasing number of strong female leads in TV drama as well as diversity on TV. This ends up being a pretty deep chat about representation and inclusiveness in well… life in general.


    Emily’s chosen inspiring historical woman is Margot Duhalde: the first female military pilot in Chile who died in February this year.


    Emily explains how Margot learned to fly at just 16 years old in 1938. She later nipped across the Atlantic to fly with the French Free Forces eventually ending up with the Air Transport Auxiliary of the British RAF, becoming the first officer in the women’s section of the ATA.


    She finally did get in with France and became their first female combat pilot. Yay!


    Follow us on social


    @emilylloydsaini
    @eggcomedy
    @periodspodcast
     
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    • 33 min
    Writing & sexism in journalism ft. Kate Thornton and Rosamund Urwin

    Writing & sexism in journalism ft. Kate Thornton and Rosamund Urwin

    Sam’s joined by presenter and founder of tbseen.com Kate Thornton and journalist Rosamund Urwin.


    Note - we recorded this show when Ros was still at the Evening Standard. She’s now a reporter for the Sunday Times.


    Kate: “I think we’re living the most exciting time right now."
    Ros: “She wrote about things in a blunt way that wasn’t done at the time"




    Sam, Kate and Ros fight it out for a liqueur chocolate over the "getting to know you" game, before getting to know some seriously inspiring women writers.


    Kate shares her love of Harper Lee, the writer who brought us "To Kill a Mockingbird" and recently “Go Set a Watchman”. She talks about the life of this private but brilliant writer, from her partnership with Truman Capote to the controversies of mis-credited work.


    We find out how Lee’s friends clubbed together to support her writing for a year, and this causes Sam and Ros to reflect upon the people who have supported their own budding careers in journalism and performance.


    They discuss how Harper Lee’s sister guarded her business affairs and protected her work, provoking a controversy that means Kate has been unable to bring herself to read ”Go Set a Watchman".


    Sam quizzes her guests on the period of history they’d visit if they could before discussing sexism in journalism and how female editorship in newspapers can influence our media massively. The pair share their shock at leaving university and encountering Fleet Street misogyny and Kate explains how @piersmorgan stood up for her when she was being intimidated by older, male journalists.


    Ros introduces the indomitable Dorothy Parker, dubbed “the mistress of the verbal grenade”. This writer and journalist with a viper’s tongue built a composite career and wheelhouse of incredible quotes that inspired Rosamund with the power of the word.


    They discuss the painful life experiences that led to Parker’s problems with alcohol and suicide attempts, her radical and blunt voice and verve in fighting for causes she believed in. Ros also reads us one of her hero's poems!




    Follow our guests:


    Kate Thornton
    @k8_thornton (twitter)
    @thekatethornton (instagram)
    tbseen.com


    Rosamund Urwin
    @RosamundUrwin (twitter)


    @periodspodcast
    @samanthabaines
    samanthabaines.com
     
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    • 31 min
    Upskirting and how to change a law ft. Gina Martin @beaniegigi

    Upskirting and how to change a law ft. Gina Martin @beaniegigi

    “We have a massive responsibility to use social media for positivity and civil engagement and bridge the gap between politics and people.”


    In today’s episode Gina Martin joins Sam in the studio. Gina is a writer and campaigner who is working to have ‘Upskirting’, the practise of taking pictures up a person’s skirt without their consent, made a sexual offence.


    Gina picks fashion designer Mary Quant, the subject of a forthcoming V&A Exhibition, as her inspirational woman from history. Period: 1950s, 1960s to the present day.


    Mary Quant: “I created clothes that worked and moved and allowed people to run, to jump, to leap, to retain their precious freedom."


    Gina tells us how the moment she was waiting to watch her favourite band at a festival became a life-changing incident, when some men began to harass her and photograph her underwear up her skirt. She explains how the scuffle escalated into a scene, the police became involved but the case was ultimately closed.


    Gina explains how she felt let down by the authorities when she discovered that the law was not on her side. When she shared a picture of the perpetrators on Facebook she was accused of harassment. She used her anger to drive her campaign for change.


    Gina talks about the media circus, finding herself pitted against caricatures on TV, and tackling online abuse and victim-blaming. She had to become an early bird to juggle a full-time job in advertising with her campaign work and discovered just how resilient she could be.


    She explains how a community of supporters have grown out of her work, and the moment she realised she had the power and drive to change the law as an individual. As an average 9-5er a bit of hard work and research has made her realise how we all have the power to participate in law - our democracy isn’t a matter purely for politicians. This is a message she is keen to share.


    Gina has picked the designer Mary Quant, often credited for the miniskirt, whose 1960s fashions typified women’s self-expression and liberation through clothing. They discuss the politics of women’s clothing and how Quant's influence went hand in hand with liberation movements in the 20th Century.


    Ahed of the Quant exhibition at the V&A next year, Sam has a brainwave and offers up Gina’s pink skirt to be featured as part of the show. Tweet your support to the V&A if you think it’s a good idea! @V_and_A




    Follow Gina
    @beaniegigi on Facebook and Twitter.
    #stopskirtingtheissue
    www.beaniegigi.com


    Find out about the V&A’s forthcoming Mary Quant Exhibition
    https://www.vam.ac.uk/exhibitions/mary-quant
    @V_and_A


    @periodspodcast
     
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    • 39 min
    Speaking with pictures ft. Laura El-Tantawy and Sheila Burnett

    Speaking with pictures ft. Laura El-Tantawy and Sheila Burnett

    Today Sam’s joined by two of the UK’s finest photographers: Laura El-Tantawy is an Egyptian photographer whose work explores themes that cross the boundaries of East and West. Sheila Burnett came to London in the 1970s as a illustrator before becoming one of London’s most esteemed theatre photographers.


    Laura: "Words for me say things I can’t express in images and images says things I definitely can’t articulate in words”


    Sheila:“If an actor sees you being sentimental they’ll be out the door like a shot!"


    Laura explains how her Mum’s artistic work inspired her to grow away from the small Worcestershire village where she was born. She aims to marry words wth image in her creative journey, travelling the world working and teaching as she follows projects she is passionate about. She also explains how the camera makes her braver and less introverted.


    Sheila also shares her travelling tales, having started with a theatre company, where she caught the bug for photography before going professional in 1985. They discuss the sentimentality of photography and how you can’t bring emotions to every shoot!


    Sam hears how Sheila developed negatives in dark rooms in the pre-digital era. She started taking her dark room on the road and developing in hotel rooms, whereas Laura shoots a lot on her phone! It gets a bit technical, but we’re sure you can keep up ;-)


    Sheila also tells us about how another woman photographer helped her find her own potential and inspired her work today.


    Laura tells us about how Umm Kulthum: The Star of the Orient. This Egyptian singer became the voice of a nation, rising from conservative roots in 1920s Egypt to sing and speak to the hearts of the country’s people. Laura reveres how this musician used her art to enact political change.


    Sheila’s inspirational woman is Christina Broom who captured Edwardian London with her camera and tripod to earn money whilst her husband was unable to work. She photographed soldiers leaving Waterloo station for the front during the First World War, captured stunning photographs of the suffragettes eye to eye as well as royalty, cavalry and historical events, creating pictures that transcend time.


    Follow our guests:


    Laura el-Tantawy
    http://lauraeltantawy.com
    @laura_el_tantawy on Instagram


    Sheila Burnett
    https://www.sheilaburnett-headshots.com
    @sheilabphoto on Twitter


    @periodspodcast
     
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    • 27 min
    Move, create and find your flow ft. Alexandra Green and Wayne Carter

    Move, create and find your flow ft. Alexandra Green and Wayne Carter

    Movement, performance and following your flow - that’s what today’s episode is all about. Sam’s joined by director and choreographer to the stars Alexandra Green and broadcaster, burlesque performer and drag performer Wayne Carter.


    And it's a 20th Century period with today's inspiring women: Katherine Dunham and Marsha P Johnson


    Alexandra: "Everything that we are is movement”
    Wayne: “These are the people that paved the way to make us as free and comfortable as we can be”


    Alexandra explains how she loves to work daily with dancers to coach and coax confidence out of them and help their talent grow. Ali also has some showbizzy credits working on music videos and in film with stars like Jess Glynne, Emeli Sande and Stormzy. 


    She’s picked Katherine Dunham as her inspirational woman from a list of incredible dance mothers. This anthropologist, dancer, author, scholar and activist has been described as a one-woman revolution. Born in Chicago in the early 20th Century, she lived as a catalyst for change and used dance to challenge issues such as segregation, racism and treatment of refugees in the arts and beyond.


    Wayne talks about using laughter to question the norm. Having started on stage in Australia, he moved to the UK and transitioned from stand-up comedy into his gender-bending drag.


    They discuss how drag has moved towards the mainstream and how London helped Wayne expand his creative career on a new level. He picks Marsha P. Johnson, one of the first trans women present at the '69 Stonewall riots, as his inspiring woman. They question why this person and the role of trans women is often overlooked in historical accounts of society-shaping events such as Stonewall.


    Wayne talks about the importance of remembering historical events such as Stonewall when enjoying the rallies, marches and cultures that are being experienced and celebrated by wider society today. We also find out about the importance of finding a safe space and community when overcoming challenges of depression and anxiety.


    The guys also cover seeking identity and gender through movement and why we need to get past tired gender stereotypes!


    Follow our guests:


    Alexandra Green
    http://www.alexandragreendance.com
    @alexandragreendance on Facebook
    @allygreendance on Twitter and Instagram


    Wayne Carter
    @1waynecarter on Twitter
    @drivingyouhomopodcast
    Driving you Homo podcast
    https://itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/driving-you-homo/id1306391887?mt=2


    @periodspodcast
     
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    • 26 min

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