200 episodes

The Physical Preparation Podcast is designed to help trainers, coaches and athletes take their performance to the next level. Featuring some of the brightest minds in our industry, we'll dive in to deconstruct smart training, and help you or your athletes maximize results!

Physical Preparation Podcast – Robertson Training Systems Mike Robertson

    • Health & Fitness
    • 4.9 • 176 Ratings

The Physical Preparation Podcast is designed to help trainers, coaches and athletes take their performance to the next level. Featuring some of the brightest minds in our industry, we'll dive in to deconstruct smart training, and help you or your athletes maximize results!

    Dave Schoch on Experience, Stories, and Stimulating the Change with the Gen Pop

    Dave Schoch on Experience, Stories, and Stimulating the Change with the Gen Pop

    Though athletes and general population clients may seem different, they have the same reason they go to the gym: to change.

    Whether it’s to change their athletic performance or their capacity to do their daily chores, IFAST morning coach Dave Schoch suggests that the job of coaches and trainers is to facilitate the changes clients desire.

    But working with the gen pop requires a different approach.

    After graduating with a bachelor’s degree in Exercise Science from Indiana University in Bloomington, Dave worked with many older general population clients as an Exercise Therapist, an experience where he had the chance to use a skill necessary to successfully train general population clients: empathy.

    In today’s episode, Dave and I discuss the factors that lead to success in training general population clients.

    We describe the role and value of empathy in coaching and explain the difference between coaching athletes and gen pop clients.

    We explain why initial assessment is crucial in determining what success really means to your clients.

    And we also underscore the art of adapting exercises according to the need and level of gen pop clients, and highlight what it means to “leave a trail of breadcrumbs” and “feed the baby birds.”

     

    Whether they’re an athlete or an 80-year-old-client, everybody comes into the gym seeking some kind of change. Do everything you can to stimulate that change. – Dave Schoch

     

    This week on the Physical Preparation Podcast:



    * How Dave fell in love with training and the world of physical preparation

    * Why Dave gravitate towards working more with general population clients versus athletes

    * What his experience as a chiropractor showed him about working with gen pop clients

    * What it means to stimulate change within a client and Dave’s philosophy on training gen pop clients

    * Setting expectations with gen pop clients and helping them understand the reason for each exercise

    * The struggles Dave has encountered with training athletes and general population clients

    * Giving gen pop clients a goal and helping them expand their vocabulary around fitness

    * How coaches and trainers can have meaningful conversations with gen pop clients

    * Why creating context is an important piece of Dave’s coaching puzzle

    * The importance of relating an exercise or a program to a client’s end-goals

    * Adapting programs and exercises to help older athletes maintain great movement

    * The check-box approach of writing a program and the value of approaching a client where they are

    * Big progressions and the need for micro-progressions for gen pop clients



     

    Connect with Dave:



    * Dave Schoch on LinkedIn

    * Dave Schoch on Instagram



     

    Subscribe, Rate & Share!

    Thanks for tuning into this week’s episode of The Physical Preparation Podcast with Mike Robertson – your one-stop-shop for fitness trainers, coaches, and athletes.

    If you enjoyed this episode, be sure to subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, SoundCloud, Spotify, and Google Podcasts and leave your honest review. I’d also love to connect via a href="https://www.facebook.

    • 54 min
    Ken Vick on Sharing, Speed Development, and Being a Radical Centrist

    Ken Vick on Sharing, Speed Development, and Being a Radical Centrist

    Although Ken Vick – President and High-Performance Director at Velocity Sports Performance – loved sports in high school, he didn’t begin his career in coaching right away. Ken completed his undergraduate studies at Columbia College Chicago with a degree in Sound Engineering & Acoustic Design.

    It wasn’t until later, when his wife worked in the fitness industry, that Ken fell in love with coaching. He soon started his career in the world of physical preparation as a weightlifting coach and progressed from there.

    Inspired to further his knowledge of athleticism, Ken eventually completed his graduate degree in Biomechanics at California State University, Long Beach.

    Through his work, Ken endeavors to make the world a better place by helping one athlete, coach, and business at a time.

    Ken joins me today to share his training philosophy and big rocks when it comes to developing speed.

    He reveals the biggest failings of the sports & fitness industry and highlights the need for training pure speed and incorporating game-like activities into practice to maximize speed development.

    He describes the role of the weight room in developing speed among athletes.

    And he also highlights what it means to be a “radical centrist” and underscores the importance of language and communication in the world of physical preparation.

     

    When working with athletes building speed, we need to bridge the gap between pure capability and perception.”- Ken Vick

     

    This week on the Physical Preparation Podcast:



    * What led Ken to the world of physical preparation

    * His career path and how he pivoted from sound engineering & acoustic design to Olympic coaching

    * Ken’s coaching and training philosophy on speed development

    * The ITSS principle in coaching and training and Ken’s thoughts on motor control

    * The importance of language, communication, and teamwork in the world of sports

    * Acceleration at top-end speed and how to develop it with athletes who struggle with it

    * The number one thing parents are most concerned about when it comes to their young athletes’ development

    * Top-end speed and why it’s controversial among coaches and athletes

    * Developing max speed or velocity with athletes

    * Why younger players need to emphasize developing speed and stamina

    * The evolution of sports technology and its abuse

    * Bridging the gap between pure capability and perception

    * Playing duck, duck, goose with athletes and the importance of incorporating game-like activities in a well-rounded program

    * The role of strength training in speed development

    * The value of building a broad foundation of different strength types



     

    Connect with Ken:



    * Velocity Sports Performance

    * Velocity Sports Performance on LinkedIn

    * Velocity Sports Performance on Instagram

    * Velocity Sports Performance on Facebook

    * Velocity Sports Performance on YouTube

    * Ken Vick on LinkedIn

    * Ken Vick on Medium

    * Ken Vick on Instagram

    * Ken Vick on Twitter



     

    Momentous – The Cleanest Recovery Products in the World

    Momentous is a world-renowned sports performance and recovery supplement. Preferred by top-level athletes in the NFL, NBA, NHL, and NCAA,

    • 56 min
    10 Important Lessons I’ve Learned from Coaching Youth Sports

    10 Important Lessons I’ve Learned from Coaching Youth Sports

    When you have kids, you start seeing the world through their eyes – and you definitely learn a lot from them.

    I played a lot of sports growing up. And by a lot, I mean if you can think of it, I’ve probably played it at some level.

    For me, personally, I enjoyed sports because I loved competing and learning athletic skills.

    And thankfully, this passion translated into a career where I get to work with athletes.!

    I could say that being in the world of sports and physical preparation all these years has taught me a thing or two about the coaching profession.

    But coaching my own kids in sports for the last five years taught me some things that I wouldn’t have learned without them.

    In this episode, I share 10 lessons I’ve learned from coaching youth sports and how they’ve influenced me as a coach.

    I share some of the questions you should ask yourself,  to help you evaluate and improve your role as a coach, trainer, or rehab professional.

    I reveal the three elements you need to check whenever you’re coaching youth sports and highlight the importance of creating a fun, engaging environment where it’s safe to make mistakes.

    I also underscore the reason coaches and trainers should strive to be a positive influence on others and how they can move from a place of significance to a place of impact.

     

    We want to evolve. As coaches, athletes, human beings, the goal is to make a mistake and learn from it. – Mike Robertson

     

    This week on the Physical Preparation Podcast:



    * Our power to control our effort and the value of hard work

    * Why I always tell every kid I work with to have fun

    * The importance of becoming a positive influence on the people you work with

    * Reps, reps, reps (and getting experience over information)

    * The inevitability of mistakes and using them as learning tools

    * The value of fostering an environment where clients and athletes can fail safely

    * The relationship between discomfort and growth

    * How to get clients and athletes to feel like they win in the gym every day

    * Why overnight successes aren’t real and the impact of striving for daily growth

    * The critical role of preparation and the difference between taking your craft seriously and taking yourself seriously

    * Why outcomes aren’t indicative of performance

    * Everything wrong with youth sports and why coaches need to teach young athletes the principles of the game

    * Moving from a place of significance and a place of impact



     

    Resources Mentioned:



    * The Slight Edge: Turning Simple Disciplines into Massive Success and Happiness by Jeff Olson



     

    Subscribe, Rate & Share!

    Thanks for tuning into this week’s episode of The Physical Preparation Podcast with Mike Robertson – your one-stop-shop for fitness trainers, coaches, and athletes.

    If you enjoyed this episode, be sure to subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, SoundCloud, Spotify, and Google Podcasts and leave your honest review. I’d also love to connect via Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram or a href="http://robertsontr...

    • 44 min
    Mike Kay on Training with Intent and Windows of Adaptation

    Mike Kay on Training with Intent and Windows of Adaptation

    Many young, aspiring coaches think that the path to becoming trainers is as smooth as just graduating from school then landing their dream job.

    Sometimes, there are lots of stops and hiccups along the way. Sometimes, there’s a lot of detours involved.

    Take Michael Kay, a Doctor of Physical Therapy based in Phoenix, Arizona. He never thought about becoming a physical therapist or trainer – in fact, he once majored in English and wanted to go to law school.

    After realizing it wasn’t right for him, Mike ended up studying physical therapy. Still, he wasn’t quite the person who helps people improve their performance that he is today.

    Mike later got connected with a private gym, training people in the morning, then saw his outpatients the rest of the day.

    When two training clients turned to three, then four, Mike found himself merging the worlds of training and physical therapy, evolving it into the practice where he finds his fulfillment today.

    Mike joins me today to share his big rocks and philosophy in training and therapy.

    He discusses the importance of having the principles of expansion and compression in mind.

    Mike explains how different people need tailored approaches when it comes to training and reveals how an individual can improve their health.

    And also underscores the value of developing observational skills and shares his advice for finding success in rotational sports.

     

    Things aren’t black and white in the structure of the human body. Look through the perspective of whether a person can expand or compress and, contextually, what they need to do in sport and life. – Mike Kay

     

    This week on the Physical Preparation Podcast:



    * Mike’s background and how he got into the world of physical preparation

    * Mike’s big rocks in therapy and training philosophy and the importance of assessing compression and expansion

    * How Mike applies his training principles to high-end athletes in rotational sports

    * Evaluating injured athletes and how to get them moving optimally again

    * The value of looking at the body as a system and the importance of self-experimentation

    * What makes a great rotational athlete and how a variety of physical activity can improve health

    * How to get a client stronger without blowing them up in the process

    * The biggest mistakes rotational sports athletes and coaches make in designing a program

    * The pitfalls of over-reliance on bilateral strength and motions

    * How underappreciating what you do in the gym can impact your movement

    * The importance of developing observational skills

    * Sturgeon’s law and the saturation of the fitness industry



     

    Related Links:



    * 2021 Sleep and Recovery Summit Registration



     

    Connect with Mike:



    * Mike Kay on Instagram



     

    Stop the Frustration! Get the Complete Coach Certification

    Are you a young fitness trainer or coach?

    Are you frustrated by the results you’re getting or the lack of resources available to learn the skills you need to be successful?

    Are you struggling to get enough clients or wondering how long you’ll be able to follow your passion for helping others?

    It’s time to stop the frustration and stop worrying. It’s time to get certified!

    If you’re serious about improving your results, serious about becoming a better coach, and serious about increasing your bottom line, then you need the Complete Coach Certification.

    In this massive course, you’ll learn:



    * How to use the R7 system to create seamless,

    • 50 min
    Max Schmarzo on Plyometrics, Jump Training and Elite Athleticism

    Max Schmarzo on Plyometrics, Jump Training and Elite Athleticism

    Playing sports initiates all things performance, whether it’s about trying to be a better jump shooter or a better athlete.

    And that’s exactly the catalyst that sparked the passion of applied sports scientist and educator Max Schmarzo.

    After playing Division III Basketball for Coe College, where he also completed his degrees in athletic training and strength & conditioning, Max was further inspired by the knowledge and experience he earned as an undergrad and collegiate athlete.

    He later furthered his studies and earned his Master’s degree in Exercise Physiology at Iowa State University.

    Today, in addition to his work as a professional consultant, Max is the founder of Strong by Science and co-founder of EdgeU, a platform that helps others develop their craft as trainers, coaches, and therapists.

    Max joins me today to share his humble beginnings as a basketball player and discuss what inspired his passion for jump training.

    He differentiates extensive from intensive jump training and describes their inverse relationship with each other.

    Max explains the different variables he considers when developing a training program and discusses the different kinds of jumps and jumpers.

    He also highlights the foundational quality of strength training in developing jumps and underscores the importance of bringing critical thinking to physical preparation.

     

    Jumping is pure movement. When someone jumps really high, it’s a pure expression of something immediate that we can’t really describe. – Max Schmarzo

     

    This week on the Physical Preparation Podcast:



    * Max’s background and his early experiences in Physical Preparation and Strength & Conditioning

    * His frustrations with basketball and how he was introduced to biomechanics at a young age

    * What sparked Max’s enthusiasm and dedication to jump training

    * The difference between extensive and intensive jump training and how they’re inversely related

    * When and where to implement extensive and intensive jump training

    * Why people have challenges with the landing aspect of plyometrics

    * The difference between jump training and plyometrics

    * The different kinds of jumps and jumpers

    * The role of stiffness and ankle work in jumps

    * How maximum effort can make people revert to bad habits

    * The value of strength training in improving the vertical jump

    * The reason it’s important to track your progress when jump training

    * The value of data interpretation and critical thinking

    * The biggest mistakes people make with their jump training

    * How to get the most out of your jump training

    * The good and the bad of fitness apps and technology



     

    Resources Mentioned:



    * Always an Athlete



     

    Connect with Max:



    * Strong by Science

    * The EdgeU

    * Strong by Science Podcast

    * The Max & Vernon Project Podcast

    * Strong by Science on YouTube

    * Strong by Science on Instagram

    * Strong by Science on Twitter

    * Strong by Science on Facebook

    * Always an Athlete on Instagram

    • 1 hr 9 min
    Danny O’Rourke on the Transition from Athlete to Coach

    Danny O’Rourke on the Transition from Athlete to Coach

    Danny O’Rourke has seen soccer from the vantage point of both athlete and coach.

    After playing collegiate soccer at Indiana University – where he played 83 games, who back-to-back National Championships and the MAC Hermann Trophy – Danny had an 11-year MLS career.

    In the early years of his career as a professional soccer player, Danny was immediately esteemed as one of the bright young prospects at midfield and later won two MLS cups, in addition to being a three-time Supporter’s Shield champion.

    Today, Danny is back at Indiana University as an assistant coach to give back to the Indiana Hoosiers.

    Currently in his third season, Danny has helped the team win back-to-back Big Ten Conferences and regular season championships.

    And along his journey from soccer player to coach, Danny has picked up some of the most important lessons a coach can learn.

    Danny joins me today to share his experiences as a collegiate and professional soccer player and how he transitioned to his role as Assistant Coach at Indiana University.

    He highlights the differences between playing soccer at the collegiate and professional levels, and he underscores the importance of filtering through the wealth of knowledge in today’s world and having different tools in your toolbox.

    He also discusses what he attributes his career success to and explains how the role of physical preparation evolved throughout his career as an athlete and coach.

     

    Every individual is unique; you can’t just have one approach to every athlete. Look at how they are as a person, then think about how you can relate defense and tactics to them. – Danny O’Rourke

     

    This week on the Physical Preparation Podcast:



    * Danny’s career in professional soccer and his transition to coaching in the world of physical preparation

    * What his views on weight training were while he was playing at the high school and collegiate level

    * Finding the perfect balance between being an authority and being an athlete’s friend

    * How Danny changed his physical preparation to maintain his growth as a player at the professional level

    * How being around better players pushes you to become a better athlete

    * The value of learning to enjoy the training process and avoiding perfectionism

    * Mentors that stood out in Danny’s career

    * The importance of having an individual approach to training athletes

    * Lessons from Danny’s time in the private sector

    * The hardest part about transitioning from athlete to coach

    * How the world of physical preparation can continue to evolve and develop

    * Danny’s career highlights as a coach and athlete

    * The benefits and importance of taking time off and enjoying downtime



     

    Connect with Danny:



    * Email: dporourk@indiana.edu



     

    Momentous – The Cleanest Recovery Products in the World

    Momentous is a world-renowned sports performance and recovery supplement. Preferred by top-level athletes in the NFL, NBA, NHL, and NCAA, Momentous is NSF and Informed Sports Certified.

    Experience the best-tasting, cleanest recovery products in the world and take your performance to the next level. Choose Momentous.

    For more information on Momentous or to place your first order, visit www.livemomentous.com/robertson – use the coupon code: Robertson20 at checkout to receive 20% off your first order or receive a free 3-pack sample.

     

    Subscribe, Rate & Share!

    Thanks for tuning into this week’s episode of The Physical Preparation Podcast with Mike Robertson – your one-stop-shop for fitness trainers, coaches, and athletes.

    If you enjoyed this episode,

    • 53 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
176 Ratings

176 Ratings

JOseph Ushi ,

Great Show!

One of my new faves! I love you seem so approachable and down to earth. As a new trainer, and aspiring CSCS it really helps hearing you talk about strategies and techniques. Really just a very educational and goodie filled show!

Zach H STL ,

Informative & Relevant

Really informative and covers relevant topics in the industry! It’s also nice how us listeners get a little bit of personal flavor from him at the beginning of each episode. It’s kind of like catching up with a mentor figure over coffee; a little bit of life, then down to business.

David - Stronger In Motion ,

Invaluable

This podcast - and all the knowledge shared - is an invaluable resource for coaches regardless of client or athlete population! Every coach who is worth their salt should be subscribed to this podcast!

Top Podcasts In Health & Fitness

Listeners Also Subscribed To