130 episodes

The UA's Department of Physics has held a Colloquium series for several years. Invited speakers from around the world, as well as scientists from the UA, have presented on their research. Fortunately, the Physics Deptartment has archived these lectures on DVD. We can now bring this outstanding content to students, researchers and others thorugh the UA's iTunes U site.

Physics Colloquium Series University of Arizona

    • Science
    • 4.3 • 3 Ratings

The UA's Department of Physics has held a Colloquium series for several years. Invited speakers from around the world, as well as scientists from the UA, have presented on their research. Fortunately, the Physics Deptartment has archived these lectures on DVD. We can now bring this outstanding content to students, researchers and others thorugh the UA's iTunes U site.

    • video
    Non-separability, Individuation, and Space-Time

    Non-separability, Individuation, and Space-Time

    Following a suggestion of David Bohm’s, I will explore the possibility that phenomena associated with entanglement and complementarity in quantum mechanics intimate a fundamentally non-spatiotemporal ordering to reality by looking at low-dimensional examples of systems that reproduce the relevant phenomena. I argue that this is a relatively unexplored path to explaining quantum correlations and give some philosophical motivation.

    • 1 hr 19 min
    • video
    Dark Matter at Colliders

    Dark Matter at Colliders

    While 27% of the Universe is made of dark matter, the particle identity of the dark matter still remains a mystery. Collider studies offers a complementary tool to explore the nature of the dark matter, in addition to dark matter direct and indirect detections. In this talk, I will discuss the collider studies of the dark matter, focusing on how to observe dark matter signals, and how to distinguish dark matter scenarios. I will cover the model-independent approach for the monojet/monophoton plus missing ET signals, as well as model-dependent signatures of dark matter produced in the cascade decay chain of parent particles.

    • 53 min
    • video
    Two decades of fulleride (C60) superconductivity: Are we seeing the light?

    Two decades of fulleride (C60) superconductivity: Are we seeing the light?

    Since the discovery of superconductivity in A3C60 (A=K, Rb) in 1991 it has been debated whether the superconductivity is being driven by electron-phonon interactions, as in the standard BCS theory, or whether it is driven by electron-electron interactions, within a theory that is yet to be discovered. A second question that has also perplexed scientists, theorists and experimentalists alike, is: why is superconductivity limited to molecular valence of 3? Why is the 3 the magic number? I will give a single answer to both questions within a theory that we have developed over the past year. It gives an entirely new perspective to correlated-electron theory of superconductivity.

    • 59 min
    • video
    Explore the TeV scale New Physics with LHC Data

    Explore the TeV scale New Physics with LHC Data

    CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the world's most powerful particle accelerator, has completed its first run. We are beginning to address one of the most exciting and fundamental questions about nature: the nature of electroweak symmetry breaking. Many open questions remain after the discovery of the Higgs boson. I will begin by explaining these issues. Then I will describe how these questions can be answered in the challenging environment of the LHC

    • 58 min
    • video
    Probing the Limits of Nuclear Activity with the COSMOS Survey

    Probing the Limits of Nuclear Activity with the COSMOS Survey

    The Cosmological Evolution Survey (COSMOS) involves the largest contiguous region of the sky ever imaged by HST. It was motivated by the study of galaxy evolution and morphology but the combination of depth, breadth and extensive multiwavelength data makes it the best region in the sky for a comprehensive study of AGN. Using deep X-ray data in the field, over 800 AGN have been spectroscopically confirmed, and the survey has particular sensitivity to low black hole mass, low accretion rates, and high levels of obscuration. A limiting accretion rate of L/L_Edd = 0.01 is seen, below which the flow may be advective. Analogs to the Milky Way black hole at z = 2 can be detected. A study of host galaxies suggests that the AGN triggering occurs on kiloparsec scales within the host. Fitting SEDs shows that the spectral components are predictable enough to efficiently select AGN below the limit of spectroscopy on large telescopes, extending this work to even lower black hole masses. The eventual goal is a complete census of intermediate mass black holes at redshifts 1-3, which is required to tell the complete story of the co-evolution of galaxies and black holes.

    • 1 hr 9 min
    • video
    Turbulent times in quantum physics.

    Turbulent times in quantum physics.

    Turbulent flows are found throughout nature, yet a deep physical understanding of the nature of turbulence stubbornly remains “the most important unsolved problem of classical physics” [attributed to Feynman]. But turbulence is not only a classical phenomenon. It has long been studied in superfluid helium, where quantum mechanics and quantized vortices enable means of characterizing turbulent flows not found in classical physics. Research is now beginning to address a new corner of the turbulence puzzle: two-dimensional quantum turbulence, with particular focus on atomic Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs). Within this field, prospects are emerging for obtaining a clear understanding of the relationships between elements of turbulence, such as energy spectra and the microscopic dynamics and structure of vortices, and characteristics both unique to BECs and analogous to those of 2D classical turbulence have been observed. In this talk I will describe some of these experimental, numerical, and theoretical studies in progress at the University of Arizona and collaborating institutions. My goal is to convey the notion that BECs provide exciting means of examining the links between turbulence in the quantum and classical worlds. Such studies may help foster new insights into broader aspects of turbulence physics.

    • 1 hr 3 min

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5
3 Ratings

3 Ratings

Chris Ubing ,

Please post new colloquia

I live 76 miles from Tucson, and can’t always get to the seminars on Friday. I really like this series, but I wish they would update to presentations from 2014 and 2015

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