48 min

Rural domestic abuse, Endometriosis, making fun of your mum Woman's Hour

    • News

Women in rural areas are half as likely to report domestic abuse as those in urban ones. Judith, who moved to the Scottish Highlands from London, tells reporter Kathleen Garragher about the culture of privacy and keeping yourself to yourself. When her husband became abusive she didn’t feel able to ask for help.
Endometriosis is a serious and lifelong disease which affects as many as 1 in 10 women. But it often goes undiagnosed. Karen Havelin has turned her experience of the disease into a novel, 'Please Read This Leaflet Carefully'. And Eleanor Thom has written a manual aimed at her fellow sufferers, as well as their friends and family, 'Private Parts: How to Really Live with Endometriosis'.
Iranian women have been taking pictures of themselves out in public and without their headscarves as part of the #WhiteWednesdays protests. The head of Tehran's Revolutionary Court has said that they now risk up to ten years in prison for sharing their pictures and videos. We talk to Masih Alinejad, the activist behind the campaign.
And, is it ever ok to use your mother as source material for your comedy whatever your relationship history? Jenni speaks to Anoushka Warden, writer and performer of ‘My Mum’s A T**t’ at this year’s Edinburgh Fringe and comedian, Sindhu Vee, ahead of her new show ‘Sandhog’ on tour in September.

Women in rural areas are half as likely to report domestic abuse as those in urban ones. Judith, who moved to the Scottish Highlands from London, tells reporter Kathleen Garragher about the culture of privacy and keeping yourself to yourself. When her husband became abusive she didn’t feel able to ask for help.
Endometriosis is a serious and lifelong disease which affects as many as 1 in 10 women. But it often goes undiagnosed. Karen Havelin has turned her experience of the disease into a novel, 'Please Read This Leaflet Carefully'. And Eleanor Thom has written a manual aimed at her fellow sufferers, as well as their friends and family, 'Private Parts: How to Really Live with Endometriosis'.
Iranian women have been taking pictures of themselves out in public and without their headscarves as part of the #WhiteWednesdays protests. The head of Tehran's Revolutionary Court has said that they now risk up to ten years in prison for sharing their pictures and videos. We talk to Masih Alinejad, the activist behind the campaign.
And, is it ever ok to use your mother as source material for your comedy whatever your relationship history? Jenni speaks to Anoushka Warden, writer and performer of ‘My Mum’s A T**t’ at this year’s Edinburgh Fringe and comedian, Sindhu Vee, ahead of her new show ‘Sandhog’ on tour in September.

48 min

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