29 min

A Critically Important Nutrient You Probably Don’t Think About Empowering You Organically - Video Edition

    • Alternative Health

Ready for some FREE education? So, let's talk about iodine. Iodine is essential for every function in your body including immune function, cardiovascular health, and metabolism. Of course it's instrumental for the thyroid. That's one of the big things we talk about in connection with iodine since iodine is the foundation for thyroid hormone production. So, it's super important.
Do you ever think about iodine? Probably not. But you probably should!  We're going to talk about iodine deficiency. We're going to talk in general about iodine; where did it come from, why it’s important, and the different types or sources of iodine for your health. Tune in and get your learn on!
* * *
Iodine
The fact is that iodine is utilized for just about every function in your body. Yet many people are unaware of their body’s need for iodine, and that iodine deficiency has reached epidemic proportions worldwide.
 
History of Iodine
Iodine was discovered in 1811 Iodine actually became the first modern medical treatment. It was the first time in medicine that one remedy was used to treat one disease, and that was when iodine was used to treat goiters. Iodine eventually became one of the primary antibiotics. It was used orally as an antibiotic—it was used topically as an antibiotic. Still today, we do use iodine in surgical rooms. We use it to paint over surgical wounds and things like that to make sure that they don’t get infected.  
Why Optimal Levels of Iodine Matters
Iodine deficiency has multiple adverse effects on growth and development, and is the most common cause of preventable mental retardation in the world. Iodine deficiency disorders result from inadequate thyroid hormone production secondary to insufficient iodine. During pregnancy and early infancy, iodine deficiency can cause irreversible effects.  
10 Signs & Symptoms of an Iodine Deficiency
Swelling in the Neck - Swelling in the front of the neck, or a goiter, is a common symptom of an iodine deficiency. It occurs when your thyroid gland is forced to make thyroid hormones when there is a low supply of iodine in the body. Unexpected Weight Gain – Low iodine levels may slow your metabolism and encourage food to be stored as fat, rather than be burned as energy. This may lead to weight gain. Fatigue and Weakness – Low iodine levels may leave you feeling tired, sluggish and weak. This is because your body needs the mineral to make energy. Hair Loss – An iodine deficiency may prevent hair follicles from regenerating. Fortunately, getting sufficient iodine can help correct hair loss that occurs due to an iodine deficiency. Dry, Flaky Skin – Dry, flaky skin may occur with an iodine deficiency, as the mineral helps your skin cells regenerate. It also helps your body sweat and hydrates your skin cells, so an iodine deficiency can cause you to sweat less. Feeling Colder Than Usual – Iodine helps generate body heat, so low levels of it may leave you feeling colder than usual. Changes in Heart Rate – An iodine deficiency may slow your heart rate, which may leave you feeling weak, fatigued, dizzy and at risk of fainting. Trouble Learning and Remembering – An iodine deficiency at any age may cause you to struggle to learn and remember things. One possible reason for this might be an underdeveloped brain. Problems During Pregnancy – Getting enough iodine is especially important for pregnant and breastfeeding women, as they have higher needs. An iodine deficiency may cause severe side effects, especially for the baby, such as stunted growth and brain development. Heavy or Irregular Periods –  Some women with an iodine deficiency may experience heavy or irregular periods. This is because low thyroid hormone levels may interfere with hormones that are involved in regulating the menstrual cycle.  
Different Kinds/Sources of Iodine
 
Salt
The addi

Ready for some FREE education? So, let's talk about iodine. Iodine is essential for every function in your body including immune function, cardiovascular health, and metabolism. Of course it's instrumental for the thyroid. That's one of the big things we talk about in connection with iodine since iodine is the foundation for thyroid hormone production. So, it's super important.
Do you ever think about iodine? Probably not. But you probably should!  We're going to talk about iodine deficiency. We're going to talk in general about iodine; where did it come from, why it’s important, and the different types or sources of iodine for your health. Tune in and get your learn on!
* * *
Iodine
The fact is that iodine is utilized for just about every function in your body. Yet many people are unaware of their body’s need for iodine, and that iodine deficiency has reached epidemic proportions worldwide.
 
History of Iodine
Iodine was discovered in 1811 Iodine actually became the first modern medical treatment. It was the first time in medicine that one remedy was used to treat one disease, and that was when iodine was used to treat goiters. Iodine eventually became one of the primary antibiotics. It was used orally as an antibiotic—it was used topically as an antibiotic. Still today, we do use iodine in surgical rooms. We use it to paint over surgical wounds and things like that to make sure that they don’t get infected.  
Why Optimal Levels of Iodine Matters
Iodine deficiency has multiple adverse effects on growth and development, and is the most common cause of preventable mental retardation in the world. Iodine deficiency disorders result from inadequate thyroid hormone production secondary to insufficient iodine. During pregnancy and early infancy, iodine deficiency can cause irreversible effects.  
10 Signs & Symptoms of an Iodine Deficiency
Swelling in the Neck - Swelling in the front of the neck, or a goiter, is a common symptom of an iodine deficiency. It occurs when your thyroid gland is forced to make thyroid hormones when there is a low supply of iodine in the body. Unexpected Weight Gain – Low iodine levels may slow your metabolism and encourage food to be stored as fat, rather than be burned as energy. This may lead to weight gain. Fatigue and Weakness – Low iodine levels may leave you feeling tired, sluggish and weak. This is because your body needs the mineral to make energy. Hair Loss – An iodine deficiency may prevent hair follicles from regenerating. Fortunately, getting sufficient iodine can help correct hair loss that occurs due to an iodine deficiency. Dry, Flaky Skin – Dry, flaky skin may occur with an iodine deficiency, as the mineral helps your skin cells regenerate. It also helps your body sweat and hydrates your skin cells, so an iodine deficiency can cause you to sweat less. Feeling Colder Than Usual – Iodine helps generate body heat, so low levels of it may leave you feeling colder than usual. Changes in Heart Rate – An iodine deficiency may slow your heart rate, which may leave you feeling weak, fatigued, dizzy and at risk of fainting. Trouble Learning and Remembering – An iodine deficiency at any age may cause you to struggle to learn and remember things. One possible reason for this might be an underdeveloped brain. Problems During Pregnancy – Getting enough iodine is especially important for pregnant and breastfeeding women, as they have higher needs. An iodine deficiency may cause severe side effects, especially for the baby, such as stunted growth and brain development. Heavy or Irregular Periods –  Some women with an iodine deficiency may experience heavy or irregular periods. This is because low thyroid hormone levels may interfere with hormones that are involved in regulating the menstrual cycle.  
Different Kinds/Sources of Iodine
 
Salt
The addi

29 min