40 min

Talk Evidence - aggravating acronyms, a time to prescribe, and screening (again‪)‬ The BMJ Podcast

    • Science

Talk Evidence is back, with your monthly take on the world of EBM with Duncan Jarvies and GPs Carl Heneghan (also director for the Centre of Evidence Based Medicine at the University of Oxford) and Helen Macdonald (also The BMJ's UK research Editor).
This month Helen talks about the messy business of colon cancer screening - which modality is best, and in what population is it actually effective (1.40)
Carl talks about how the Netherlands did the right research at the right time to stop a new pregnancy scan before it became routine (10.35)
The Rant: acronyms in research papers (17.45)
Mini Rant: politicisation of the NHS, and Carl pitches for yet another job (25.15)
Research in the news has talked about the importance of when drugs are taken, to maximise efficacy. Melvin Lobo, cardiologist specialising in hypertension joins us to explain that research and why we seem to have forgotten about that effect.

Reading list:
Colorectal cancer screening with faecal immunochemical testing, sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy: a clinical practice guideline
https://www.bmj.com/content/367/bmj.l5515

Effectiveness of routine third trimester ultrasonography to reduce adverse perinatal outcomes in low risk pregnancy (the IRIS study): nationwide, pragmatic, multicentre, stepped wedge cluster randomised trial
https://www.bmj.com/content/367/bmj.l5517

Bedtime hypertension treatment improves cardiovascular risk reduction: the Hygia Chronotherapy Trial
https://academic.oup.com/eurheartj/advance-article/doi/10.1093/eurheartj/ehz754/5602478

Talk Evidence is back, with your monthly take on the world of EBM with Duncan Jarvies and GPs Carl Heneghan (also director for the Centre of Evidence Based Medicine at the University of Oxford) and Helen Macdonald (also The BMJ's UK research Editor).
This month Helen talks about the messy business of colon cancer screening - which modality is best, and in what population is it actually effective (1.40)
Carl talks about how the Netherlands did the right research at the right time to stop a new pregnancy scan before it became routine (10.35)
The Rant: acronyms in research papers (17.45)
Mini Rant: politicisation of the NHS, and Carl pitches for yet another job (25.15)
Research in the news has talked about the importance of when drugs are taken, to maximise efficacy. Melvin Lobo, cardiologist specialising in hypertension joins us to explain that research and why we seem to have forgotten about that effect.

Reading list:
Colorectal cancer screening with faecal immunochemical testing, sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy: a clinical practice guideline
https://www.bmj.com/content/367/bmj.l5515

Effectiveness of routine third trimester ultrasonography to reduce adverse perinatal outcomes in low risk pregnancy (the IRIS study): nationwide, pragmatic, multicentre, stepped wedge cluster randomised trial
https://www.bmj.com/content/367/bmj.l5517

Bedtime hypertension treatment improves cardiovascular risk reduction: the Hygia Chronotherapy Trial
https://academic.oup.com/eurheartj/advance-article/doi/10.1093/eurheartj/ehz754/5602478

40 min

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