1 hr

Thinking about vitamin D with Andrew Grey and Tom Chatfield The BMJ Podcast

    • Science

Interest in vitamin D, and it’s association with a range of health outcomes continues - at least if the regular flurry of papers on the subject that are submitted to The BMJ are anything to go by, and with Covid-19, interest has piqued again.

GPs are regularly asked to prescribe it, and to test for deficiencies. Low levels of vitamin D are associated with a large number of health outcomes, but, given the high costs and low accuracy of tests, would it be easier just to recommend taking supplements without testing vitamin levels first, taking a “won’t hurt but might help” approach? If so, should we all be taking them, and would doing so help to prevent against COVID-19?

Our guests:

Andrew Grey is an endocrinologist and an associate professor of Medicine at the University of Auckland.

Tom Chatfield is a philosopher, author and broadcaster, whose work looks at humans and technology, as well as cognitive biases.

Interest in vitamin D, and it’s association with a range of health outcomes continues - at least if the regular flurry of papers on the subject that are submitted to The BMJ are anything to go by, and with Covid-19, interest has piqued again.

GPs are regularly asked to prescribe it, and to test for deficiencies. Low levels of vitamin D are associated with a large number of health outcomes, but, given the high costs and low accuracy of tests, would it be easier just to recommend taking supplements without testing vitamin levels first, taking a “won’t hurt but might help” approach? If so, should we all be taking them, and would doing so help to prevent against COVID-19?

Our guests:

Andrew Grey is an endocrinologist and an associate professor of Medicine at the University of Auckland.

Tom Chatfield is a philosopher, author and broadcaster, whose work looks at humans and technology, as well as cognitive biases.

1 hr

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