18 episodes

A podcast about our changing planet and what we're doing to manage that change.

Pod of the Planet The Earth Institute at Columbia University

    • Science
    • 5.0 • 15 Ratings

A podcast about our changing planet and what we're doing to manage that change.

    17. Mapping Out a Vaccination Strategy in Nigeria

    17. Mapping Out a Vaccination Strategy in Nigeria

    COVID-19 vaccination campaigns in many parts of the world have highlighted the urgent need for accurate spatial data, which has led governments and international development institutions to seek out reliable sources of such information to inform their COVID-19 interventions. A recent New York Times article spotlights the GRID3 program, which works with countries to generate, validate, and use geospatial data on population, settlements, infrastructure, and boundaries. Program partners include Columbia’s University’s Center for International Earth Science Information Network (CIESIN), the United Nations Population Fund, WorldPop at the University of Southampton, and the Flowminder Foundation.

    Our podcast this week features a conversation between GRID3 communications officer Chisimdi Onwuteaka, and Nazir Halliru, who is now the country manager for GRID3 Nigeria. Halliru describes how GRID3 is producing and distributing paper-based maps — featuring data on vaccination sites, population, comorbidities risk, and settlement names — to support Nigeria’s COVID-19 vaccination planning and other development interventions.

    You can find Pod of the Planet wherever you listen to podcasts, on Apple iTunes, Spotify, Soundcloud, iHeartRadio and Stitcher.

    For more information about this work, make sure to check out this news story and video. To explore and download GRID3 data, visit the GRID3 Data Hub.

    • 20 min
    16. World Oceans Day 2021

    16. World Oceans Day 2021

    The world oceans cover just over 70 percent of the planet. The ocean produces about half of the oxygen that sustains Earth, feeds and employees millions. It’s also pivotal to regulating the climate as it absorbs massive amounts of carbon dioxide. In 2008, the United Nations General Assembly designated June 8 as World Oceans Day “to celebrate our world’s shared ocean and our personal connection to the sea, as well as to raise awareness about the crucial role the ocean plays in our lives and the important ways people can help protect it.” Concern for the vast and mighty ocean has prompted the U.N. to launch the Ocean Decade — 10 years of challenges to “conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources by 2030."

    Understanding, appreciating, and protecting this massive resource has surfaced as a major international priority. But, when it comes to knowing our oceans in-depth, humanity is still in the dark.

    In this episode of Pod of the Planet, entitled “Mapping the Mysterious Deep,” Marie DeNoia Aronsohn speaks to Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory marine geophysicist Vicki Ferrini about a project to better understand our world oceans. The Nippon Foundation - GEBCO Seabed 2030 Project has an ambitious goal: to create a comprehensive, detailed map of the entire ocean floor by 2030.

    • 24 min
    15. Flying into the eye of the volcano

    15. Flying into the eye of the volcano

    In March, Iceland's Fagradalsfjall volcano woke up from a 6,000-year slumber; soon it was jetting lava fountains as high as 1,200 feet, and sending fiery outflows into nearby valleys. Most people run from volcanic eruptions, but volcanologist Einat Lev decided to get on a plane and get as close as possible. Lev, who works at Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Observatory, specializes in analyzing how lava bodies develop and move, and Fagradalsfjall is prime for study: It has a steady, vigorous lava supply, but is not big or explosive enough to be too dangerous. It's also accessible, a short drive from the capital city of Reykjavik.

    In this episode of Pod of the Planet, Earth Institute science news editor Kevin Krajick speaks with Lev about her experiences on the trip, and erupting volcanoes in general. Listeners: Check out the spectacular drone footage she took. You can also see stories and photos from two of her previous expeditions, to the Quizapu Volcano in the high Chilean Andes, and Hawaii's monstrous Kilauea.

    As of this recording, Fagradalsfjall was still erupting. It has not caused any serious damage so far, but if the lava continues spreading, it could cut off the Ring Road, Iceland's main highway. Stay tuned and follow State of the Planet for the latest (Icelandic authorities have a live webcam trained on the volcano).

    You can find Pod of the Planet wherever you listen to podcasts, on Apple iTunes, Spotify, Soundcloud, iHeartRadio and Stitcher.

    Please send feedback or questions to podoftheplanet@gmail.com.

    • 19 min
    14. Ask what Nature can do for you

    14. Ask what Nature can do for you

    Today we're celebrating International Women's Day with a special interview with Professor Ruth DeFries on her new book, "What Would Nature Do? A Guide for Our Uncertain Times" (14:56). She talks about how humanity can survive by adopting strategies of the nonhuman world.
    Also Sarah Fecht, content manager for the State of the Planet discusses a couple recent pieces from the blog including how C02 levels may have affected dinosaur migration and the science behind C02 and how it traps heat.
    Be sure to check the rest of the amazing content highlighting the work of women at the Earth Institute by going to blogs.ei.columbia.edu.

    • 41 min
    13. Corruption, migration and COVID-19

    13. Corruption, migration and COVID-19

    COVID-19 has completely upended our way of life. It has infiltrated all parts of society affecting many overlooked places. That's why in this episode we explore the toll it has taken on migration both across borders and within countries. More specifically we look at how corruption, failed policies and a lack of understanding are all making things worse for vulnerable groups in India and Kenya.

    We get a first-hand account from small-scale women traders in Kenya on what they're having to deal with. We also speak with Amrita Dhillon, a professor of political economy at King’s College London and Jackie Klopp, a research scholar at the Earth Institute at Columbia University. Both are researchers with the Global Integrity Anti-Corruption Evidence program. You can find more at ace.globalintegrity.org

    • 36 min
    12. Shopping for the planet

    12. Shopping for the planet

    In our final episode of the year, Kyu Lee speaks with three of his colleagues: Phebe Pierson, Sarah Fecht and Charlotte Munson. They talk about Phebe's interview with Barnard professor Sandra Goldmark and her new book, "Fixation: How to Have Stuff without Breaking the Planet" (24:27). Sarah talks about some of the top stories coming out of the State of the Planet blog (13:10). And Charlotte, an undergraduate student at Columbia, gives us her all around perspective on what campus life has been like during the pandemic. Thanks again to all our supporters, we appreciate all the wonderful feedback we've gotten. Have a happy, healthy holiday and see you in the new year!

    • 1 hr 11 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
15 Ratings

15 Ratings

rating people ,

GREAT!!

So inspiring really makes me know what is happening in the world.

Top Podcasts In Science

You Might Also Like