25 episodes

Every week the Virtual Kampers explore the importance of our National Park and Historic sites from those who live and work in them every day. We'll learn about history, science and the beauty of nature from a unique perspective. And, find out why Park Rangers love the National Parks.



Topics covered include: National Parks, hiking, camping, exploring, the outdoors, resources, public lands, conservation, education, and the Park Ranger career.

Find out more: www.PodcastsWithParkRangers.com

Patreon: www.patreon.com/virtualkamper

Podcasts With Park Rangers - A National Parks Podcast Virtual Kamper - Host: Lucas V-K

    • Places & Travel
    • 4.6 • 76 Ratings

Every week the Virtual Kampers explore the importance of our National Park and Historic sites from those who live and work in them every day. We'll learn about history, science and the beauty of nature from a unique perspective. And, find out why Park Rangers love the National Parks.



Topics covered include: National Parks, hiking, camping, exploring, the outdoors, resources, public lands, conservation, education, and the Park Ranger career.

Find out more: www.PodcastsWithParkRangers.com

Patreon: www.patreon.com/virtualkamper

    Oregon Caves NM: Wild Caving, Geology, and the River Styx – PWPR 25

    Oregon Caves NM: Wild Caving, Geology, and the River Styx – PWPR 25

    In the Siskiyou mountains at 4,000 feet exists one of the few marble caves in the National Park Service. On this episode of Podcasts with Park Rangers, we explore the unique features of Oregon Caves National Monument you can find strange geology, go wild caving, and visit the only Wild and Scenic river underground called the River Styx.



     

    Show Notes found at: https://www.virtualkamper.com/pwpr25/

    Help keep the show on the road: https://www.patreon.com/virtualkamper/









    Podcast Resources:



    * Oregon Caves National Monument and Preserve – NPS Website

    * Full-Time Freedom Week

    * National Wild and Scenic Rivers

    * Episode 1 – Carlsbad Caverns: Finding Peace in the Darkness

    * Episode 2 – Carlsbad Caverns: Bats, Caves and Microbe Wars







    Topics Covered







    * About Ranger Katie Dagastino

    * About Oregon Caves National Monument and Preserve

    * How the Oregon Caves Are Formed

    * 1874 – The Caves Are Discovered

    * The River Styx

    * Wild Caving at Oregon Caves National Monument

    * Unique Ecosystems at Oregon Caves National Monument and Preserve

    * Early 1900’s Cavemen?

    * Bats in Oregon Caves National Monument

    * Katie’s Interest in Oregon Caves National Monument and the NPS

    * Thanks to Our Listeners – Let’s Connect More!







    About Ranger Katie Dagastino

    Ranger Katie works with both the Forest Service and the National Park Service. With the NPS, she’s been at Oregon Caves National Monument for 3 seasons. Her background in geology gives her a unique perspective on the park, and she guides tours within the caves all summer long.

    About Oregon Caves National Monument and Preserve

    Oregon Caves is located at 4000 feet above sea level in the Siskiyous, a sub range of the Klamath Mountains in Southwest Oregon. The area is home to 30 different types of rocks and minerals.

    Many of the rocks found around the caves are found at the bottom of oceans or come from volcanoes. This includes serpentine rocks which are toxic when they break down, so plants and animals in the area are adapted to survive the poisonous conditions of the environment.

    How the Oregon Caves Are Formed

    The caves themselves are solution caves formed via carbonic acid and are much more intimate compared to a larger cave like Carlsbad Caverns. Cave decorations are formed via calcite.

    The Oregon Caves are some of the few in the Park System formed out of marble. Around 250 million years ago, the modern day caves laid under the Pacific Ocean. Bacterial reefs formed and eventually become a sedimentary rock. The heat and pressure underneath the surface created metamorphic marble,

    • 48 min
    Bainbridge Island: The Incarceration of Japanese Americans in WWII

    Bainbridge Island: The Incarceration of Japanese Americans in WWII

    The flourishing immigrant community at Bainbridge Island was home to people from all over the world looking for a new start in America. People from Finland, Japan, Italy, Austria, Hawaii, China and other countries came together to form an American melting pot of cultures and traditions. However, after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, the forced incarceration of Japanese Americans tore apart the community of Bainbridge Island. On this episode of Podcasts with Park Rangers, we explore the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II.



     

    Show Notes found at: https://www.virtualkamper.com/pwpr24/

    Help keep the show on the road: https://www.patreon.com/virtualkamper/









    Podcast Resources:



    * Visit the Bainbridge Island Memorial – NPS Website

    * Bainbridge Island Japanese American Community

    * Register to vote!

    * Episode 23 – Klondike Gold Rush NHP: Seattle’s Gold Rush Boom





    Topics Covered



    * About Ranger Kevin Mahé

    * About Bainbridge Island Japanese Exclusion Memorial

    * Japanese Immigrants on Bainbridge Island Pre World War II

    * Racism During World War II

    * FBI Investigations of Japanese Immigrants

    * Arrests Made Without Probable Cause

    * Executive Order 9066

    * The Executive Orders Effects on Bainbridge Island

    * Effects on Property Owned by Japanese Americans

    * Camps at Manzanar and Minidoka

    * Do Those Incarcerated Talk About It Today?

    * An End to Incarceration

    * A Formal Apology

    * The Memorial on Bainbridge Island

    * Kevin’s Interest at Bainbridge Island and the NPS

    * Thanks to Our Listeners – Let’s Connect More!



    About Ranger Kevin Mahé

    Ranger Kevin’s been with the Park Service for 10 years, both as an employee and a volunteer. Specifically, he’s been with Bainbridge Island for 1 year.

    Kevin’s background in education gives him a unique perspective of the parks. They’re a place where people can learn in a hands-on environment and he’s still been able to apply his expertise. Additionally, the NPS gives Kevin the opportunity to be a lifelong learner — a reason why many end up in the Park Service.

    About Bainbridge Island Japanese Exclusion Memorial

    Bainbridge Island is located just west of Seattle across the Puget Sound — part of Minidoka National Historic Site located in Idaho where they imprisoned many of the Japanese Americans during World War II.

    The Japanese Americans on Bainbridge Island were the first community forced from their homes after Pearl Harbor. They initially imprisoned many at Manzanar in California. Then, they were later transferred to the prison in Minidoka, Idaho which is why Bainbridge Island is part of Minidoka NHS.

    Unfortunately, the expulsion of Japanese Americans went so well at Bainbridge Island, they ended up interning over 120,

    • 49 min
    Klondike Gold Rush NHP: Seattle’s Gold Rush Boom – PWPR 23

    Klondike Gold Rush NHP: Seattle’s Gold Rush Boom – PWPR 23

    The Klondike Gold Rush of 1897 caused an economic boom for the city of Seattle. People flocked to the Pacific Northwest to gather supplies and board steamships north to Alaska. Newspapers promised new wealth and riches for any who made it to the Klondike. On this episode of Podcasts with Park Rangers, we take a look at how the Gold Rush made Seattle the city it is today.



     

    Show Notes found at: https://www.virtualkamper.com/pwpr23/

    Help keep the show on the road: https://www.patreon.com/virtualkamper/









    Podcast Resources:



    * Klondike Gold Rush NHP – NPS Website

    * Register to vote!

    * Find more episodes of Podcasts with Park Rangers!





    Topics Covered



    * About Ranger Julie Fonseca de Borges

    * About Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park

    * Seattle – A Nice Place to Call Home

    * Coast Salish Peoples and the Denny Party

    * The Great Seattle Fire

    * Rebuilding Seattle

    * The Klondike Gold Rush – 1897

    * Stampeders – Who Are the People of the Klondike Gold Rush?

    * Strike it Rich? Or Fool’s Gold?

    * Modern Day Seattle

    * Julie’s Thoughts on Klondike Gold Rush NHP and the National Park Service

    * Thanks to Our Listeners – Let’s Connect More!



    About Ranger Julie Fonseca de Borges

    Ranger Julie Fonseca de Borges is Chief of Interpretation for the Seattle area National Park units which include Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park. She’s been a Park Ranger for almost 13 years, and specifically at Klondike for 4 of those years.

    With a background in journalism and art education, Julie’s start in the parks began at Chamizal National Memorial where they celebrate the peaceful resolution of a 100-year old border dispute between the US and Mexico through the arts. With Ranger Julie’s background, she created art education programs for the public before she relocated to Seattle.

    About Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park

    Klondike is unique because it’s an international park which celebrates the 1897 Gold Rush. Two US sites — located in Seattle, WA and Skagway, AK — commemorate the event.

    Seattle’s history is important because of the 100,000 people who journeyed to the Klondike for the Gold Rush, about 70,000 came through Seattle. The majority of the people through Seattle took a boat to either Skagway or Dyea, AK.

    The story in Seattle is the experience most people who ventured to the Klondike experienced. People landed in Skagway and then journeyed up to Dawson City and beyond to the gold fields. The site in Canada tells more of the tale about the gold fields themselves.

    Seattle – A Nice Place to Call Home

    The Seattle area is the home of the Coast Salish people for generations. And in the mid-1800’s, Euro-Americans begin to settle in the area.

    The landscape is quite a bit different than what you’d find in Seattle today. New settlers found hilly tidal flats with a lot of wooded areas. The Puget Sound offered great access to seafood, and most people found it a nice place to settle because of the resources.

    • 44 min
    Mt Rainier NP: Glaciers and Climate Change – PWPR 22

    Mt Rainier NP: Glaciers and Climate Change – PWPR 22

    Geomorphologist Paul Kennard calls Mount Rainier National Park the canary in a coal mine when it comes to climate change. Glaciers on Rainier melt at a rapid rate, causing issues with the park’s rivers and wildlife. And, resource rangers are at the forefront of dealing with a rapidly changing environment. On this episode of Podcasts with Park Rangers, we talk about the effects of climate change on the most glaciated peak in the lower 48 states.

     

    Show Notes found at: https://www.virtualkamper.com/pwpr22/

    Help keep the show on the road: https://www.patreon.com/virtualkamper/









    Podcast Resources:



    * Mount Rainier NP – NPS Website

    * An Ascent of Mount Rainier by John Muir

    * Episode 21: Mt Rainier NP – Volcanic Activity and Park Geology





    Topics Covered



    * About Paul Kennard

    * Glaciers at Mount Rainier

    * What is a Glacier?

    * Glacial Formation at Mount Rainier

    * Seasonal Changes at Mount Rainier

    * How Do We Measure the Amount the Glaciers Have Receded?

    * Issues Caused by Climate Change at Mount Rainier

    * Debris Flows in Mount Rainier

    * How Do We Deal with Climate Change Issues?

    * The Pineapple Express of 2006

    * Why Climate Change Study at Mount Rainier Important?

    * Paul’s Love for Mount Rainier National Park and the NPS

    * Thanks to Our Listeners – Let’s Connect More!



    About Paul Kennard

    Since 2003, Paul has worked as the regional geomorphologist for Mount Rainier National Park. Geomorphologists study landscape features and look at the forces which create and destroy them. Paul calls it “geology on steroids” because unlike most geology, a lot of these changes occur in time spans as little as hours and up to about a decade.

    Paul’s background in the oil industry, studying changes in glaciers, and research on forestry effects on salmon in rivers put him in a unique to work for the National Park Service when the position opened at Mount Rainier.

    Glaciers at Mount Rainier

    Mount Rainier is quite striking in it stands nearly 2 miles higher than all the other mountains in the area and because it’s capped with glaciers.

    The number of glaciers at Rainier fluctuates due to definitions and climate change. At the time of this recording, there are 29 named glaciers at the mountain’s peak. Paul anticipates this number to decrease because of climate change — especially the ones located lower on the mountain.

    What is a Glacier?

    A Glacier is a body of perennial ice. The ice actually moves under its own weight like a slow river. This movement differentiates a glacier from a perennial snowfield, which stays in place.

    Snow from the winter accumulates, and when it sits over the winter, ice forms at the top of the glacier. The glacial ice flows to a lower part of the mountain and melts. The ice formation at the top and the melt at the bottom are definitive features of a glacier.

    Mount Rainier is the most glaciated peak in lower ...

    • 49 min
    Mt Rainier NP: Volcanic Activity and Park Geology – PWPR 21

    Mt Rainier NP: Volcanic Activity and Park Geology – PWPR 21

    A trip to Mount Rainier National Park brings you through lush landscapes dotted with wildflowers. However, a beast lies beneath the park! The mountain is considered one of the most dangerous volcanoes in the world. Does that mean the park is dangerous? On this episode of Podcasts with Park Rangers sit down with a Park Geologist to learn more about the volcanic activity and geology of Mount Rainier National Park.

     

    Show Notes found at: https://www.virtualkamper.com/pwpr21/

    Help keep the show on the road: https://www.patreon.com/virtualkamper/









    Podcast Resources:



    * Mount Rainier NP – NPS Website

    * Mount Rainier Wiki Page

    * Episode 22: Mt Rainier NP – Glaciers and Climate Change





    Topics Covered



    * About Scott Beason

    * About Mount Rainier

    * An Active Volcano

    * How Does a Subduction Zone Work?

    * Historical Eruptions at Mount Rainier

    * Types of Volcanoes

    * One of the Most Dangerous Volcanoes in the World

    * How They Monitor the Volcano

    * Current Research into the Geology of Mount Rainier

    * Not All Lahars Occur During Eruptions

    * Travels to Colombia to Study Lahar

    * The Devastation of Nevado del Ruiz

    * What Mount Rainier’s Geologists Can Learn from Nevado del Ruiz

    * The Ultimate Question: Is It Safe to Visit Mount Rainier?

    * Scott’s Love for Mount Rainier and the NPS

    * Thanks to Our Listeners – Let’s Connect More!



    About Scott Beason

    Scott is one of the few Park Geologists in the National Park System. According to him, there are about 8-9 people who work in the specialty.

    Since 2004, Scott has worked off and on with the National Park Service and started as an intern at Mount Rainier. Through a variety of roles: interpretation, law enforcement, and resources — Scott found a love for the NPS.

    Additionally, the Pacific Northwest captured Scott’s heart. It’s why he now calls Mount Rainier home, even after he’s worked at other parks. As a result, he decided to work on the NPS resource team and study the geology of Mount Rainier after he graduated with his Master’s degree.

    About Mount Rainier

    Mount Rainier is approximately 70 miles southeast of Seattle/Tacoma in Washington state. As the fifth National Park in the Park System, it spans 240,000 acres and a variety of ecosystems. Low elevation rainforest, sub-alpine areas, volcanoes, and glaciers draw over 2 million visitors a year.

    The mountain is a beacon in the Pacific Northwest at 14,410 feet tall. And when you consider all the other mountains in the area are around 3,000 feet, it stands out for hundreds of miles around. In addition to the height, it’s also the most glaciated peak in the Cascade Mountain range.

    An Active Volcano

    Mount Rainier is considered to be an active volcano because it has a magma source beneath the surface. And over ½ million years, it’s erupted over and over again. Evidence of both magma eruptions and lahars exist.

    • 46 min
    Lewis and Clark NHP: A Multilayered Tale of Exploration – PWPR 20

    Lewis and Clark NHP: A Multilayered Tale of Exploration – PWPR 20

    The tale of Lewis and Clark is one many Americans heard in school. Two mountain men who explore the west with a passion for adventure. While many of us romanticize the expedition, there’s a lot more to this story. The Corps of Discovery, composed of 33 people, heads west with military men, hunters, translators, a slave and a dog. This won’t be the tale you remember from high school.

     

    Show Notes found at: https://www.virtualkamper.com/pwpr20/

    Help keep the show on the road: https://www.patreon.com/virtualkamper/









    Podcast Resources:



    * Mount Rainier NP – NPS Website

    * The Journals of Lewis and Clark

    * Discover more Podcasts with Park Rangers episodes!





    Topics Covered



    * About Ranger Jon Burpee

    * About Lewis and Clark National Historic Park

    * Who Are Lewis and Clark?

    * The Corps of Discovery

    * Not All of the Corps of Discovery Are Military

    * York – An Enslaved Explorer

    * Seaman – Lewis’ Dog

    * The Rocky Mountains Present a Dilemma

    * Sacagawea and an Amazing Coincidence

    * Future Implications of Lewis and Clark’s Expedition

    * Lewis and Clark’s Arrival at Fort Clatsop

    * Relations with the Chinook and Clatsop Tribes

    * Ranger Jon Burpee’s Love for Lewis and Clark NHP and the NPS

    * Thanks to Our Listeners – Let’s Connect More!



    About Ranger Jon Burpee

    Ranger Jon Burpee pinpoints his fascination with history to two particular National Park visits as a child: Fort Vancouver in Washington state and Fort Clatsop at Lewis and Clark National Historic Park.

    Those two particular adventures lead him to a 20-year career with the NPS. And, we coincidentally find him back at Fort Clatsop for today’s interview. He’s now superintendent of the park sharing with us the same history he found enchanting as a child.

    About Lewis and Clark National Historic Park

    Today, many people follow the expedition of Lewis and Clark by car — they start in St Louis and drive to Fort Clatsop in Oregon. Located on the Pacific along the Columbia River, the park marks the western end of Lewis and Clark’s journey.

    Fort Clatsop is a few miles from the Ocean, but near all the resources necessary to spend 4-5 months over the winter. Wood, water and elk are prolific throughout the area and allowed for survival.

    Who Are Lewis and Clark?

    Lewis and Clark both embodied the young republic — they’re both landed gentry from Virginia families.

    President Jefferson hired Lewis as his secretary. Both knew each other growing up, and they both bonded as bachelors in the White House. They discussed the importance of science and the exploration of America in order to combat British corporate interests.

    Shortly after the Louisiana Purchase, President Jefferson entrusted Lewis to head west and explore the new territory. Jefferson hoped to find Wooly Mammoths out west. And, the expedition was an opportunity to prove America was just as good if not better than the rest of t...

    • 49 min

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5
76 Ratings

76 Ratings

Every nick i try is taken ,

Love these

Love hearing about the National Parks hope there will be a pod cast on each of the 60+ parks. Thank you for the great ones I have listen to.

BothAlionas ,

Bring it back!

Really well done, too bad it isn’t continuing. Won’t make it to most of the parks, but love hearing a good show about them!

DCJess-2018 ,

So fun to listen to, and so well done!

I’m a radio professional and was very impressed with how well produced this podcast is. Insightful questions, fun to listen to and much more sound-rich than your average podcast. Will give you wanderlust!

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