15 episodes

Leading scholars from across the nation introduce our small Tennessee town to artisans and abolitionists, poets and politicians, scientists and suffragists. We’ll see what the past has to say to our present.

Polk's America James K. Polk Home and Museum

    • History
    • 5.0 • 8 Ratings

Leading scholars from across the nation introduce our small Tennessee town to artisans and abolitionists, poets and politicians, scientists and suffragists. We’ll see what the past has to say to our present.

    Tiffany Momon & Victoria Hensley | Black Craftspeople Digital Archive

    Tiffany Momon & Victoria Hensley | Black Craftspeople Digital Archive

    The BCDA, a nationally-celebrated project changing the face of decorative arts and material culture scholarship, recently expanded the archive into Tennessee. Founders Dr. Tiffany Momon and Victoria Hensley share their research and the reasons why identifying and studying black craftspeople is so important.

    • 27 min
    Sally Givens | South Union Shaker Village

    Sally Givens | South Union Shaker Village

    The Shakers' American utopian experiment succeeded in creating an egalitarian culture contrary to societal norms in Polk's America. In 1807 the Shakers established a village in frontier KY that eventually would be home to over 300 followers. Curator and Educator Sally Givens introduces the people and material culture of the South Union Shaker Village in Auburn, KY. 

    • 29 min
    Alba Campo Rosillo | G. P. A. Healy's Portraits of the President

    Alba Campo Rosillo | G. P. A. Healy's Portraits of the President

    When U.S. artist George Peter Alexander Healy (1913-1894) painted the portrait of James Polk for the first time in 1846, the sitter was the President of the United States and residing at the White House. By the time that Healy painted Polk again in 1858, the President had already died. Alba Campo Rosillo discusses the portraits' differences in terms of format and purpose, and elaborates on the economic and political issues to which the paintings subtly refer.

    • 31 min
    Katherine Hughes | David Drake and Edgefield Stoneware in Polk's America

    Katherine Hughes | David Drake and Edgefield Stoneware in Polk's America

    In the early 1800s, South Carolinian businesses used enslaved labor to create a booming stoneware pottery industry in the Edgefield District. The artistry and durability of this pottery created an enduring legacy reflective of the complex social issues of Polk’s America. Katherine Hughes brings considerable research and insight into times and techniques of these enslaved craftsmen.

    Hughes conducted research as the Peggy N. Gerry Research Scholar at the American Wing of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. She is currently serving as Graduate Research Assistant at MTSU's Center for historic Preservation.

    • 22 min
    Brenda Hornsby-Heindl | Creating the Kitchen Garden

    Brenda Hornsby-Heindl | Creating the Kitchen Garden

    Consultant Brenda Hornsby Heindl shares her research behind the creation of a c. 1820 kitchen garden at the President James K. Polk Home & Museum. The garden provides a tangible connection to the people who lived and labored on the property. Special guests include chef Paul Jensen, brewmaster Zac Fox, and curator Candice Candeto. Musical performances by The Grateful Bluegrass Band.

    • 28 min
    Zacharie Kinslow | The Complex Life of Elias Polk

    Zacharie Kinslow | The Complex Life of Elias Polk

    Mr. Kinslow's research focuses on the life of Elias Polk, who was enslaved by the Polk family. While enslaved, Elias' labor furthered James Polk's political and professional careers. After emancipation Elias entered politics as a Southern Democrat, the party of his enslaver. Featuring Scott Warren, site Director at the President James K. Polk State Historic Site in North Carolina.

    • 33 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
8 Ratings

8 Ratings

columbia tennessee ,

Polk’s America

The quality of this delightful podcast is superior in content, personality and sound.

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