11 episodes

We are at a pivotal point in Canada’s history, and hosts Merrell-Ann Phare and Michael Miltenberger want to talk about it. In this series, they explore reconciliation by talking with people who are living it. They have in-depth, funny, and revealing discussions with a variety of people, from activists to comedians, who are all focusing on improving Canada through reconciliation in big, small, and surprising ways.



Reconciliation tends to be perceived as a door that only swings. It’s like a bat-wing door. Indigenous/non-Indigenous. However, in reality, it’s a 360 degrees. Each episode will demonstrate hosts Merrell-Ann Phare and Michael Miltenberger’s authentic breadth of knowledge, commitment to fairness, empathy and an unvarnished truth as they recalibrate your understanding what is going on in reconciliation.

Porcupine Podcast Porcupine Podcast

    • News Commentary
    • 5.0 • 2 Ratings

We are at a pivotal point in Canada’s history, and hosts Merrell-Ann Phare and Michael Miltenberger want to talk about it. In this series, they explore reconciliation by talking with people who are living it. They have in-depth, funny, and revealing discussions with a variety of people, from activists to comedians, who are all focusing on improving Canada through reconciliation in big, small, and surprising ways.



Reconciliation tends to be perceived as a door that only swings. It’s like a bat-wing door. Indigenous/non-Indigenous. However, in reality, it’s a 360 degrees. Each episode will demonstrate hosts Merrell-Ann Phare and Michael Miltenberger’s authentic breadth of knowledge, commitment to fairness, empathy and an unvarnished truth as they recalibrate your understanding what is going on in reconciliation.

    Meet The Hosts: Merrell-Ann Phare and Michael Miltenberger

    Meet The Hosts: Merrell-Ann Phare and Michael Miltenberger

    In this introductory episode, Porcupine writer Deborah Bowers turns the tables on hosts Merrell-Ann and Michael to find out why they're doing this podcast. She asks about their stories, backgrounds, and personal experience with reconciliation in Canada.

    • 29 min
    The Importance of Treaty Land Entitlement for Reconciliation With Laren Bill

    The Importance of Treaty Land Entitlement for Reconciliation With Laren Bill

    Laren Bill, the Independent Chairperson at Implementation Monitoring Committee discusses how he got into the field of treaty land entitlement and how important it is for reconciliation. He also discusses his role as the holder of the sacred bundle at the Centre for Indigenous Environmental Resources.







    About Our Guest







    The Implementation Monitoring Committee (IMC) is the alternative dispute resolution table under the Manitoba Framework Agreement -Treaty Land Entitlement. As Chairperson, Laren Bill is responsible for facilitating and monitoring the disputes referred to the IMC by the Parties to the Manitoba Framework Agreement.







    The Manitoba Treaty Land Entitlement Framework Agreement (MFA) was signed on May 29, 1997 between Canada, Manitoba, and the Treaty Land Entitlement Committee (TLEC). Under this historic agreement, up to 445,417 hectares (1,100,626 acres) of land will be provided to the Entitlement First Nations (EFNs) represented by the TLEC. Manitoba will provide up to 399,008 hectares (985,949 acres) of Crown land. Canada will contribute $76 million.The Implementation Monitoring Committee







    In This Episode







    * Implementation Monitoring Committee* Centre for Indigenous Environmental Resources* The Manitoba Framework Agreement (MFA)







    Laren Says:







    >> (02:52): And I was really drawn to it because of the fact that it included both the Indigenous scientific perspective, as well as the Western scientific perspective. And I say Indigenous scientific perspective because a lot of times that, that view or that perspective is not seen as a scientific worldview. 







    >>(08:20): There was always this understanding that, from the First Nations perspective, that there was this inaccurate acreage count because they knew that their full population and their membership on the list was not accounted for.







    >> (15:56): What really is holding up these lands from being set apart as reserve in urban centers? Why do we only have a handful set apart as reserve here in Manitoba? Whereas our neighbors in Saskatchewan, they have over 72 urban reserves and more on the books, slated to be set apart this year.   







    Other Ways to Enjoy The Importance of Treaty Land Entitlement for Reconciliation







    Episode 10 Transcript

    • 32 min
    Hip-Hop and Reconciliation with Crook the Kid

    Hip-Hop and Reconciliation with Crook the Kid

    Rapper Crook The Kid, also known as Dylan Jones talks with Merrell-Ann and Michael about his music, music in general, and how it connects to reconciliation. He talks about growing up, writing down lyrics as a teenager, and how he knew this is the career he wanted. and shares lyrics relevant to reconciliation. 







    About Our Guest







    Crook The Kid, born Dylan Jones, hails from Fort Good Hope, a subarctic community of about 400 people in northern Northwest Territories, 500 kilometres north of Yellowknife and about 10 kilometres below the Arctic Circle. Jones’s journey from the Arctic Circle to Bluesfest began in 2017 when Ottawa’s Erin Benjamin, president and chief executive of the Canadian Live Music Association, travelled to Yellowknife to mentor young artists, and was matched with Crook The Kid. Blown away by his craft and his story, she arranged for him to spend time in Ottawa around the time of Westfest, where he connected with the Ottawa Indigenous rapper, Cody Coyote. Jones began writing as a way to process his upbringing. “Growing up in a shack essentially with almost nothing, being on the land, I channelled it into music,” he said, “And it helped me in a situation where there wasn’t anybody to talk to about a really aggressive upbringing. With that, I told my story and decided I felt better, and when I started to show other friends, they really latched on to itRead Dylan’s Whole Story in the Ottawa Citizen







    Crook The Kid Says:







    >> (16:51): Where I’m from, your home is a horizon. The streets are paved with stone, riddled with violence. Where I’m from your life is what you make it. And you can have what you want long as you take it. 







    >> (20:14): I feel that reconciliation is the ability to stop talking when another group is and allow them to speak their voice and live their truth, regardless of how it may affect your emotion.







    >> (35:45): There was a lot of people who were just encountering their own hardships and there was a lot of parents and a lot of people still caught in the midst of really overcoming the, whether it be residential school or whether it be addiction or whether it be this, or it was a very tumultuous time in the history of Fort Good Hope. 







    I feel like people, if they listen to it, they’re not listening for fancy production values or what effect I used on my voice or anything. I feel like, well, I hope that they’re listening to the story. 







    In This Episode







    * Crook the Kid on Spotify* Crook The Kid on Reverb Nation







    Other Ways to Enjoy Hip-Hop and Reconciliation







    Episode 10 Transcript

    • 37 min
    Indigenous Law, Consent, and Reconciliation With Bruce McIvor

    Indigenous Law, Consent, and Reconciliation With Bruce McIvor

    Bruce McIvor is the Principal of First People’s Law. He sits down with Merrell-Ann and Michael to discuss different aspects of Indigenous law. They tackle questions like ‘what are the differences between a chief and a hereditary chief?’ and ‘What is Indigenous Law and how is it different from Aboriginal law?’ Also, how can we best move forward? And Why is land rights so important?







    About Our Guest







    Dr. Bruce McIvor, lawyer and historian, is principal of First Peoples Law Corporation, a law firm dedicated to defending and advancing Aboriginal title, Aboriginal rights and Treaty rights. His work includes both litigation and negotiation on behalf of Indigenous Peoples. Bruce is recognized nationally and internationally as a leading practitioner of Aboriginal law in Canada.Bruce is dedicated to public education. He recently published the third edition of his collection of essays entitled First Peoples Law: Essays in Canadian Law and Decolonization. He is also an Adjunct Professor at the University of British Columbia’s Allard School of Law where he teaches the constitutional law of Aboriginal and Treaty rights.Bruce is a proud Métis from the Red River in Manitoba. He holds a law degree, a Ph.D. in Aboriginal and environmental history, and is a Fulbright Scholar.Bruce McIvor’s Bio – First People’s Law







    In This Episode







    * First Peoples Law* Wet’suwet’en and the proposed pipeline* Indian Act* Aboriginal title land* 2014 Supreme Court of Canada Tsilhqot’in decision* The Federal Recognition of Rights Policy* Reconciliation Commission Call to Action Number 46* Haida decision







    Bruce Says:







    >> (07:13): There’s not one in Indigenous law, different Indigenous peoples across country have their own laws. And just like with the traditional governance system, those laws existed and predate the colonization of what we now referred to as Canada. So when people are talking about Indigenous law, they’re talking about Indigenous peoples’ own laws, and they’re different, of course, all depending who you’re talking to and who you’re dealing with.







    >> (10:06) At the heart of it, it’s about who gets to decide how the land should be used. And this is a fundamental question, not just in BC, but across the country that Indigenous peoples deal with on a daily basis. Who gets to decide, how their lands should be used.







    >>(14:01): So if you really want to provide a us...

    • 46 min
    Sports and Reconciliation

    Sports and Reconciliation

    In this episode, Patti-Kay Hamilton talks about how sports can affect reconciliation in Canada’s beautiful north. She shares personal experiences of competing and coaching in the Arctic Winter Games and her time working with CBC North. (Images from Patti-Kay Hamilton.)















    See more photos from Patti-Kay Hamilton on her YouTube channel.







    About Our Guest







    Patti-Kay Hamilton is the author of Trapline to Deadline: Trading a Skinning Knife for a CBC Microphone. It is about how a dog race changed her life and led to a 30-year career at CBC North. After retirement Hamilton won the Canada Writes creative non-fiction prize for The Hunter and the Swan. Her work has been translated and published in Belgium and Canadianfolk singer; Ian Tyson is adapting her storyinto song.Currently, she is working on a children’s story based on an ancient family legendand a collection of short fiction that takes place in Wood Buffalo National Park. In her spare time Hamilton coaches NWT ski and snowshoe biathletes. Patti-Kay lives in Fort Smith.







    Patti-Kay Says:







    >> 02:19: “I could not leave the North. I fell in love with it and fell in love with the people.”







    >>(03:25): I phoned the manager at CBC and kind of ranted about their lack of coverage of Northern events. And for me, personal interest in dog mushing, nothing on a dog race where they had no trouble talking about Martina Navratilova, winning a tennis match.







    >> (07:18): And this is what he said: ‘Sport is huge in the little communities. Some of the best players I’ve seen in my life are from the communities and might never get a chance to take their skills somewhere else, unless they have proper tools. I remember as kids, how much fun we had playing floor hockey. If we had been given some things nice to use the, these people might’ve been NHL players, NHL players could’ve come out of Fort Good Hope, if they were given the means, if they were given the means,’ he said, ‘and we fail to do that over and over again.’







    >> (08:16): We hear people talking eloquently about suicide and drugs, well sport and culture are two of the gateways that can help people out of the darkness.







    >> 12:45: “These were kids who’d come off traplines where they hauled water, chopped wood, snared, rabbits, and somehow these people saw it as an advantage over the privileged athletes who had expensive gear and skilled coaches.”







    >> 19:29: I was told by my late mother-in-law, Mary Cadieux, that a story is a gift that needs to be shared. So she gifted me with a lot of stories and I share those stories and every story has a little scary moment, but always an important lesson  







    >>((29:58): There can’t be a law that says you must now reconcile. You have to be moved deeply to do that.







    >>(30:38): My husband is a fourth generation residential school person. So it’s around us. It’s part of us. It affects our relationships with people, our workplace, our elections. But I think in the South, it’s maybe not as visible. And that’s where the media could play a role. The impression I get when I’m in the South visiting family, friends, they kind of have washed their hands of it. Whoosh.

    • 35 min
    Indigenous Economics and Reconciliation With André Le Dressay

    Indigenous Economics and Reconciliation With André Le Dressay

    Indigenous Economics and Reconciliation with André Le Dressay







    How have economics affected Indigenous Canadians? How do you bring First Nation governments into the regional economy? These are just a few of the questions that Merrell-Ann and Michael ask André Le Dressay, the Director at the Tulo Centre of Indigenous Economics.







    About Our Guest







    André Le Dressay







    Andre has been the Director of Fiscal Realities since its incorporation in 1992. André has significant experience with First Nation governments, financial modeling, education, and database design. He has written numerous academic and consulting reports in his areas of expertise: transaction costs, economic impact assessments, First Nation tax systems, and institutional analysis. André holds a PH.D. in Economics from Simon Fraser University. – Fiscal Realities







    In This Episode







    * Tulo Centre of Indigenous Economics* Fiscal Realities * Collaborative Leadership Initiative* First Nation Tax Commission* Season 1, Episode 5: Taxation and Reconciliation with Manny Jules







    André Says:







    >> 02:25: On the Mission of the Tulo Centre of Indigenous Economics: “Well, it’s, it was based on an observation, a piece of research that we completed in 1998 that showed that the cost of doing business on First Nation lands was four to six times higher than it was anywhere else.” – André Le Dressay







    >>03:27: “One of the difficulties we have is we take words and give them the meaning that we want to apply. And reconciliation is one of the most difficult words to, for anyone to appreciate, because of course it’s used, it’s used quite often in relationships, right? That have gone bad.” – André Le Dressay







    >>03:57: So you have 150 years of economic injustice. And so reconciliation has to be the process of bringing Indigenous governments back into the, into the economy. – André Le Dressay







    >> 12:47: “I know this is an odd thing for an economist to say, but economics is one of the most romantic philosophies there are.” – André Le Dressay







    >>13:19: “Economics is a romance language.” – Merrell-Ann Phare







    >>15:43: “A little while ago, for instance, Starbucks made everyone go through diversity training because of something that was said in a Starbucks and it was a very offensive. And it brought all these people in to close to every Starbucks across the United States to go to diversity training. And It didn’t work….So when you think of what can Canadians do, or what can we, all of us do to do this? This is a very simple answer.” – André Le Dressay







    The Challenge Before Us







    >> 16:35: “One of the challenges that Firs...

    • 21 min

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