80 episodes

The Poverty Research & Policy Podcast is produced by the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP) and features interviews with researchers about poverty, inequality, and policy in the United States.

Poverty Research & Policy Institute for Research on Poverty

    • Science
    • 4.9 • 20 Ratings

The Poverty Research & Policy Podcast is produced by the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP) and features interviews with researchers about poverty, inequality, and policy in the United States.

    Brieanna Watters and Robert Stewart on Native Americans and Monetary Sanctions

    Brieanna Watters and Robert Stewart on Native Americans and Monetary Sanctions

    In this episode of the Poverty Research & Policy Podcast, we hear from Brieanna Watters and Robert Stewart about a paper they coauthored* on Native Americans and Monetary Sanctions involving the criminal legal system. They discuss how Native American experiences in relation to the legal system are often unique, how the rural nature of Indian Country matters when it comes to policies around fines and fees, and how their research in Minnesota finds higher levels of fines and fees for Native American defendants, particularly in areas near reservations.  Watters is a Ph.D. candidate in sociology at the University of Minnesota, and Stewart is an assistant professor in the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Maryland. 
    *The paper discussed in the episode was coauthored by Stewart, Watters, Veronica Horowitz, Ryan Larson, Brian Sargent, and Christopher Uggen. You can find it in a special issue of RSF: The Russell Sage Foundation Journal of the Social Sciences at https://www.rsfjournal.org/content/8/2/137
     

    • 35 min
    José Pacas on the Puzzle of Measuring Rural Poverty in the Supplemental Poverty Measure

    José Pacas on the Puzzle of Measuring Rural Poverty in the Supplemental Poverty Measure

    In this episode, we hear from José Pacas about data challenges involved in measuring rural poverty in the Supplemental Poverty Measure or SPM and how the subtleties of poverty measurement can have real world implications for the lived experiences of low-income people in rural places. 
    Dr. Pacas is currently serving on a National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine panel on Evaluation and Improvements to the Supplemental Poverty Measure. He is Chief of Data Science and Research at Kids First Chicago and was previously a researcher at IPUMS at the University of Minnesota. Dr. Pacas was a 2019-2020 fellow in the IRP Scholars in Residence Program. 

    • 34 min
    Whitney Gent on How Homelessness is Portrayed in Movies and Why it Matters

    Whitney Gent on How Homelessness is Portrayed in Movies and Why it Matters

    People experiencing homelessness are more often part of the background in movies than featured as the protagonists. But when they are the focus of a film, the ways that they and those who feel moved to help them are portrayed can have a big impact on how the public and policymakers think about homelessness and possible solutions.
    In this episode, we talk with Dr. Whitney Gent about what she and her coauthor found in their analysis of films featuring homeless characters from 1983 to 2018, and in particular the concepts of visibility and agency. Gent is an assistant professor in the School of Communication at the University of Nebraska Omaha. She earned her doctorate in rhetoric, politics, and culture from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and was a graduate research fellow with IRP during her doctoral studies.

    • 34 min
    Lindsey Bullinger on Evaluating Risk of Child Maltreatment During the COVID-19 Pandemic

    Lindsey Bullinger on Evaluating Risk of Child Maltreatment During the COVID-19 Pandemic

    When the pandemic hit, many people who study child maltreatment, abuse, and neglect were worried that some children might be at greater risk due to more time at home and other factors that the pandemic could exacerbate. But at the same time, many children had less access to other adults who might be able to notice if something was wrong.
    For this episode, we talked with Dr. Lindsey Bullinger of Georgia Tech’s School of Public Policy about how she and her colleagues went about trying to measure rates of child maltreatment early in the pandemic when many families needed to stay at home.

    • 19 min
    Prentiss Dantzler on the Concept of Who Deserves to Have Access to Public Housing

    Prentiss Dantzler on the Concept of Who Deserves to Have Access to Public Housing

    In this episode, we hear from Professor Prentiss Dantzler about how perceptions of who lives in public housing – and who deserves that type of support – have developed over the past century, and how that has affected the urban poor and particularly people of color. His research includes reviewing the congressional testimony around the issue of providing housing for returning World War II GIs. Dantzler is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Toronto and a former IRP Visiting Scholar.

    • 19 min
    Quentin Riser on Family Income Instability and How it Might Affect Kids' School Readiness

    Quentin Riser on Family Income Instability and How it Might Affect Kids' School Readiness

    In this episode, we hear from Dr. Quentin Riser about how family income instability in early childhood affects children's school readiness and later outcomes. He talks about how administrative data, such as in the Wisconsin Administrative Data Core, can offer a more complete picture of the financial ups and downs that young families face, and how that can matter for children later on in school.  

    • 19 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
20 Ratings

20 Ratings

Thai 274 FHA ,

Great show

I listen to this show religiously. As a member of the nonprofit sector, it’s really important to hear this research broken down in an accessible and understandable way! Also, it’s just really interesting information regardless of career/field.
Don’t love some of the speakers sometimes…(I understand diversity is important but Michael Strain, really? He made fun of college students for being poor. I would think the IRP has better taste.)
Either way, I look forward listening to (nearly) every episode, and anxiously await more!

Eric B G ,

So needed

As someone who works in the non profit sector helping to eliminate poverty everyday, it is so incredibly helpful to have real research available. The podcast format allows me to learn while I’m driving or exercising or working in the yard. Otherwise, I’m not sure I would take the time to learn as much as I should.

Top Podcasts In Science

Hidden Brain
Alie Ward
Jordan Harbinger
Sam Harris
Neil deGrasse Tyson
PRX and Greater Good Science Center

You Might Also Like

On Being Studios
Esther Perel Global Media & Gimlet
NPR
American Public Media
The Center for Investigative Reporting and PRX
New York Times Opinion