Preparing Your Home Before the Inspection Eugene Real Estate Podcast with Gary Raze

    • Education

Before your home gets inspected, check off these easy-to-fix items so they don’t show up in the final report.    Want to sell your home? Get a FREE home value report.  Want to buy a home? Search all homes for sale. Let’s say you’re a seller and you’ve received an offer on your home. In the ensuing days, an inspector will come to the home and check for various items of concern—rot and pests are a few examples. As the seller, you can act preemptively and take care of a few items before the inspector has to be the one who flags them. Here’s how:  First, make sure all lightbulbs inside and outside your home are working. When it comes time for showings, illuminate your home a little more by installing brighter bulbs—especially if yours are a little older and have dulled. You’ll want to check and potentially replace your CO2 and carbon monoxide detectors as well. Your current detectors may have served you well for the last ten years, but being as they’re older models, the inspector will make a note of that in the report. Ensure that your water heater is secure in the event of an earthquake by tying two straps, not just one, to it. Next, clear any debris that may have collected around your electrical panel, your attic space, or underneath your house. The inspector needs to have unobstructed pathways and access to these areas. “ As the seller, you can act preemptively and take care of a few items before the inspector has to be the one who flags them. ” For those who have pets, be sure to place them in a carrier or take them with you when leaving the home to let the inspector conduct their work.  Also, every toilet in your home will need to be squeaky clean before the inspector sets foot in your home.They will use a moisture detector to establish whether any seepage is coming out from the wax rings, so scrub the area around the base of the toilet. Another thing that will catch the inspector’s eye is the downspout. If yours run straight down and water isn’t being properly diverted away from the home, you can expect to be flagged in the final report. To avoid this, purchase a plastic downspout diverter—they’re inexpensive, and they’ll funnel the water about nine to 12 inches away from the home. Those are just a few easy and quick loose ends up to tie up in your home before having an inspection done. If you have any questions, please feel free to text or call me at 541-554-5825 or shoot me an email at garyraze@remax.net. I look forward to talking with you soon!

Before your home gets inspected, check off these easy-to-fix items so they don’t show up in the final report.    Want to sell your home? Get a FREE home value report.  Want to buy a home? Search all homes for sale. Let’s say you’re a seller and you’ve received an offer on your home. In the ensuing days, an inspector will come to the home and check for various items of concern—rot and pests are a few examples. As the seller, you can act preemptively and take care of a few items before the inspector has to be the one who flags them. Here’s how:  First, make sure all lightbulbs inside and outside your home are working. When it comes time for showings, illuminate your home a little more by installing brighter bulbs—especially if yours are a little older and have dulled. You’ll want to check and potentially replace your CO2 and carbon monoxide detectors as well. Your current detectors may have served you well for the last ten years, but being as they’re older models, the inspector will make a note of that in the report. Ensure that your water heater is secure in the event of an earthquake by tying two straps, not just one, to it. Next, clear any debris that may have collected around your electrical panel, your attic space, or underneath your house. The inspector needs to have unobstructed pathways and access to these areas. “ As the seller, you can act preemptively and take care of a few items before the inspector has to be the one who flags them. ” For those who have pets, be sure to place them in a carrier or take them with you when leaving the home to let the inspector conduct their work.  Also, every toilet in your home will need to be squeaky clean before the inspector sets foot in your home.They will use a moisture detector to establish whether any seepage is coming out from the wax rings, so scrub the area around the base of the toilet. Another thing that will catch the inspector’s eye is the downspout. If yours run straight down and water isn’t being properly diverted away from the home, you can expect to be flagged in the final report. To avoid this, purchase a plastic downspout diverter—they’re inexpensive, and they’ll funnel the water about nine to 12 inches away from the home. Those are just a few easy and quick loose ends up to tie up in your home before having an inspection done. If you have any questions, please feel free to text or call me at 541-554-5825 or shoot me an email at garyraze@remax.net. I look forward to talking with you soon!

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