120 episodes

Print Run is a podcast created and hosted by Laura Zats and Erik Hane. Its aim is simple: to have the conversations surrounding the book and writing industries that too often are glossed over by conventional wisdom, institutional optimism, and false seriousness.

We’re book people, and we want to examine the questions that lie at the heart of that life: why do books, specifically, matter? In a digital world, what cultural ground does book publishing still occupy?

Whether it’s trends in the queries from writers that hit our inboxes or the social ramifications of an industry that pays so little being based in Manhattan, we’re here for it. Probably to laugh at it and call it names, but here for it nonetheless.

Print Run is the happy-hour conversation after a long day at a catalog launch; it’s the bottle of wine you drink most of on a Tuesday when the manuscripts are no good. We’re for writers, for publishers, for anyone who’s opened a book and wanted to know—really know—what goes into getting the damn thing made.

Join us. We’ll talk about the worst sex scene we’ve ever read and wonder aloud about how millennials will affect the books of the future. We’ll figure out why Jonathan Franzen wants to replace your child with a penguin and whether or not that penguin will be buying hardcovers when he grows up.

Print Run Podcast Erik Hane and Laura Zats

    • Arts
    • 4.8, 204 Ratings

Print Run is a podcast created and hosted by Laura Zats and Erik Hane. Its aim is simple: to have the conversations surrounding the book and writing industries that too often are glossed over by conventional wisdom, institutional optimism, and false seriousness.

We’re book people, and we want to examine the questions that lie at the heart of that life: why do books, specifically, matter? In a digital world, what cultural ground does book publishing still occupy?

Whether it’s trends in the queries from writers that hit our inboxes or the social ramifications of an industry that pays so little being based in Manhattan, we’re here for it. Probably to laugh at it and call it names, but here for it nonetheless.

Print Run is the happy-hour conversation after a long day at a catalog launch; it’s the bottle of wine you drink most of on a Tuesday when the manuscripts are no good. We’re for writers, for publishers, for anyone who’s opened a book and wanted to know—really know—what goes into getting the damn thing made.

Join us. We’ll talk about the worst sex scene we’ve ever read and wonder aloud about how millennials will affect the books of the future. We’ll figure out why Jonathan Franzen wants to replace your child with a penguin and whether or not that penguin will be buying hardcovers when he grows up.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
204 Ratings

204 Ratings

SyKira ,

Phenomenal

Laura and Erik are like the super-intelligent, snarky friends we all wish we had. Their talks are easy to listen to, I always walk away knowing something new, and usually laugh while I’m at it. They discuss everything from industry news to writetips to gossip to politics, but all with a level head that doesn’t detract from their obvious passion for it. If you’re a writer, author, industry professional, or just want to laugh - this podcast if for you.

createadream ,

A Bit Biased Towards Traditional Publishing

As someone who published my own first book in 2012 (only because I had attended a writers workshop by a larger publishing house and their message to all the aspiring authors was ‘build your platform’ and then maybe we’ll be interested in you) I find the comments about the hybrid and self-published authors to be a bit discouraging and divisive. Aren’t we all in this together? Sure traditional publishers have their prestige and many authors are able to build their platform or secure representation by an agent and strike gold. But for most that world will remain inaccessible. Now having written 5 books and having started my own concierge publishing company I am finding the service I provide (which my authors pay for) to be extremely rewarding for everyone involved. We produce the results of a traditional publisher in less than half the time and help our authors see how a book can serve many purposes. It can help them build an existing brand, open new doors, spread their message and enjoy writing and publishing without and added pressure. I even know of aspiring authors who will not ever consider self-publishing because of the snobbery of those who are traditionally published and look down on those who ‘do it themselves’. That’s so sad to me. So I do enjoy your banter and overall good nature (clearly here I am listening) but today on Episode 112 the discourse about the publisher who partnered with Forbes got to me. My thoughts - great business move!

burdeensky ,

You know, you know?

I think the two hosts do a fine job relaying useful information, it’s just it’s very distracting when they can’t go a sentence without saying “you know?” In some sentences they used it up to three times and I found myself clinging onto those two words waiting for the shoe to drop. It was to the point that it distracted from the wealth of knowledge each was able to drop. Next time, you know, maybe practice speaking without relying on “you know,” you know?

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