42 min

Productive Reading: Effortless, by Greg McKeown The Productive Woman

    • Self-Improvement

In this episode we’re continuing our recurring “Productive Reading” series, this time talking about my key takeaways from Effortless, by Greg McKeown.







Making life's most meaningful tasks enjoyable and effortless



We are continuing our Productive Reading recurring series, which I started two or three years ago. In the past, we’ve talked about the lessons and key takeaways I found in books such as Gary Keller’s The ONE Thing (episode 133), The Power of Habit, by Charles Duhigg (episode 147), 3 books written by Brené Brown (episode 166), Soulful Simplicity, by Courtney Carver (episode 182), The Free-Time Formula by Jeff Sanders (episode 211), James Clear’s wonderful Atomic Habits (episode 230), Free to Focus, by Michael Hyatt (episode 250), Attention Management, by Maura Nevel Thomas (episode 271), and most recently, The Minimalist Home, by Joshua Becker (episode 324). This time I’m sharing some of my most important takeaways from a new book by Greg McKeown, who’s the author of one of my favorite productivity books, Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less. His new book is called Effortless, and I’ve been looking forward to talking with you about it. [Note: Unless otherwise identified below, all quotes in this post are from Effortless.



Who is Greg McKeown? 



From the back cover copy:



"Greg McKeown is a speaker, a bestselling author, and the host of the popular podcast What’s Essential. He has been covered by The New York Times, Fast Company, Fortune, Politico, and Inc., and has been interviewed on NPR, NBC, Fox, and The Steve Harvey Show. He is also among the most popular bloggers for LinkedIn and is a Young Global Leader for the World Economic Forum. McKeown’s New York Times bestselling book Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less has sold more than a million copies worldwide. Originally from London, England, he now lives in California with his wife, Anna, and their four children."



Why did I read this book?



Essentialism is one of my top three most influential books on productivity and one I return to periodically for inspiration,

In this episode we’re continuing our recurring “Productive Reading” series, this time talking about my key takeaways from Effortless, by Greg McKeown.







Making life's most meaningful tasks enjoyable and effortless



We are continuing our Productive Reading recurring series, which I started two or three years ago. In the past, we’ve talked about the lessons and key takeaways I found in books such as Gary Keller’s The ONE Thing (episode 133), The Power of Habit, by Charles Duhigg (episode 147), 3 books written by Brené Brown (episode 166), Soulful Simplicity, by Courtney Carver (episode 182), The Free-Time Formula by Jeff Sanders (episode 211), James Clear’s wonderful Atomic Habits (episode 230), Free to Focus, by Michael Hyatt (episode 250), Attention Management, by Maura Nevel Thomas (episode 271), and most recently, The Minimalist Home, by Joshua Becker (episode 324). This time I’m sharing some of my most important takeaways from a new book by Greg McKeown, who’s the author of one of my favorite productivity books, Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less. His new book is called Effortless, and I’ve been looking forward to talking with you about it. [Note: Unless otherwise identified below, all quotes in this post are from Effortless.



Who is Greg McKeown? 



From the back cover copy:



"Greg McKeown is a speaker, a bestselling author, and the host of the popular podcast What’s Essential. He has been covered by The New York Times, Fast Company, Fortune, Politico, and Inc., and has been interviewed on NPR, NBC, Fox, and The Steve Harvey Show. He is also among the most popular bloggers for LinkedIn and is a Young Global Leader for the World Economic Forum. McKeown’s New York Times bestselling book Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less has sold more than a million copies worldwide. Originally from London, England, he now lives in California with his wife, Anna, and their four children."



Why did I read this book?



Essentialism is one of my top three most influential books on productivity and one I return to periodically for inspiration,

42 min