29 episodes

Psychologists Dr. Leo Bobadilla and Dr. Katie Gordon discuss science, clinical practice, and societal controversies with expert guests.

Psychodrama Katie Gordon & Leo Bobadilla

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.8 • 23 Ratings

Psychologists Dr. Leo Bobadilla and Dr. Katie Gordon discuss science, clinical practice, and societal controversies with expert guests.

    Leaving Las Academia Pt.1- From the R1 Psych Dept to the Social Justice LLC

    Leaving Las Academia Pt.1- From the R1 Psych Dept to the Social Justice LLC

    The past two years have been marked by among many social factors, the “great resignation.”  This phenomenon has extended to academia and it is a surprise because many refer to it as “the best job in the world.” An occupation that allowed individuals to pursue their own interests, and provided significant autonomy, and for those in tenure track, the possibility of a very stable, protected employment virtually unavailable in any other industry or setting. However, the great resignation has arrived to academia as well.  In the next 2-3 episodes we are attempting to do a brief series that captures various voices of individuals leaving academia for other pursuits. Given our expertise, our guests are psychologists. We are aware that this may seem to narrow the topic significantly. However, we hope that the diverse background of our guests and the fact that they are psychologists, may help provide a special insight into their own motivations and a unique view into the great resignation as they explain why they decided to leave “the best job in the world.”

    Our first guest in our “Leaving las Academia” series is Dr. Nelson Zounlome who actually posted his resignation from a counseling psychology position at the University of Kentucky on twitter, and that is how we first contacted him.  As you will hear, Dr. Zounlome is a first-generation college student, child of immigrants, and native of South Bend, IN. He earned Bachelor's degrees in Psychology & Sociology, and a Master's degree in Learning Science-Educational Psychology Track, and a Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology from Indiana University. He is a former McNair Scholar, Ford Foundation Fellow, Herman B. Wells Graduate Fellow, and until recently an assistant professor in the counseling psychology department at the university of Kentucky. He published the book “Letters to My Sisters & Brothers: Practical Advice to Successfully Navigate Academia as a Student of Color” and he has channeled his passion for studying “academic persistence and mental wellness to promote holistic healing among Black, Indigenous, and People of Color” in his new enterprise, Liberate the Block or LTB as he calls it to in his words “help BIPOC communities liberate themselves and achieve their wildest dreams.”

    We hope you enjoy listening to this episode as much as we did recording it.

    • 1 hr 5 min
    Some We Love, Some We Hate, Some We Eat-Animals and Us with Dr. Hal Herzog

    Some We Love, Some We Hate, Some We Eat-Animals and Us with Dr. Hal Herzog

    For this episode, we are very pleased to have Dr. Hal Herzog back to our show to talk to us about his research area in human-animal interactions(anthrozoology).  Hal has published a second edition of his fascinating book “Some We Love, Some We Hate, Some We Eat- Why It’s So Hard to Think Straight About Animals.”  His research has been published in journals such as Science, The American Psychologist, The Journal of the Royal Society, The American Scholar, New Scientist, Anthrozoös, BioScience, The Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, and Animal Behavior. His work has been covered by Newsweek, Slate, Salon, National Public Radio, Scientific American, USA Today, The Washington Post, The Boston Globe, The Chicago Tribune and many other newspapers.  In 2013, he was given the Distinguished Scholar Award by the International Society for Anthrozoology.


    In this episode, we focused on “The Pet Effect” -the idea that pets improve the well-being of humans.  Hal goes over the data in this regard, and discusses how the “pet effect” may be at least overstated, if not  non-existent, and the reasons why this perception of “animals as miracle workers” remains.  Including how much he loves his cat Tilly, and how he thinks Tilly helps his well-being despite her bird-icidal ways and countless examples of people whose lives are decidedly worse or made more difficult by pets.


    We delve deeper in the topic by examining the effectiveness of  animals in animal assisted therapy (AAT), for example the use of dogs for the treatment of PTSD with veterans, and question whether the investment required to train the dogs (up to $35,000 per dog) is worth the small effect and the very mixed (at best) data on it.  


    We conclude by talking about the ethics and morality of keeping animals as pets, and draw some interesting parallels between meat-eating and pet-ownership. Hal also talks about whether it is better to not spay and neuter pets (the answer may surprise you!) and how his daughter Katie Herzog, a journalist, arrived at the decision for her dog “Moose” by digging into the data.  We finished by talking about the issue of personhood for animals including upcoming court cases in the US, like the one of “Happy” the elephant at the Bronx zoo, arguing that some animals may be considered persons, and thus, may not be kept in captivity.  A very fun, interesting episode, and thought provoking episode. We hope you enjoy it!


    (This episode was NOT brought to you by Purina because boy, they may not like what we have to say).


    Research and Articles in Episode:


    Link to Hal’s Website and Book


    National Academy of Sciences review of VA study on potential therapeutic effect of emotional support dogs on Veterans with PTSD


    Happy is an Elephant. Is He Also a Person? Jill Lepore, The Atlantic Magazine.


    Moose Nuggets: A journey through one dog’s testicles. By Katie Herzog. Substack


    Dogs are born with ears and tails. They should get to keep them. By Karin Brulliard. Washington Post. 

    • 1 hr 7 min
    Let’s Talk About Sex & Mental Health with Dr. David Ley

    Let’s Talk About Sex & Mental Health with Dr. David Ley

    We talked to Dr. David Ley, a world-renowned clinical psychologist who has written prolifically in both academic and popular culture outlets about sexuality and mental health. He is a member of the board of the Sexual Health Alliance and is recognized as an international expert on issues related to psychology, pornography, and sexuality. Dr. Ley is regularly interviewed for television (e.g., Anderson Cooper, Katie Couric, Dr. Phil) and by the press (e.g., the New York Times, the Washington Post) and is exceptional at sharing scientific research and clinical expertise with the public in an accessible manner. He is the author of three books: Insatiable Wives: Women Who Stray and the Men Who Love Them, The Myth of Sex Addiction, and Ethical Porn for Dicks. We talked to Dr. Ley about how partners can increase sexual satisfaction through communication, sociocultural factors that influence attitudes toward sexuality, his books and research, the importance of competence in these areas for mental health professionals, and more. For additional information about his important contributions to the field, check out Dr. Ley’s website and follow him on Twitter.


    Links Mentioned in the Episode:


    Professional Organizations & Resources


    Sexual Health Alliance

    American Association of Sexuality Educators, Counselors, and Therapists

    Association for the Treatment of Sexual Abusers

    APA Division 44 Consensual Non-Monogamy Task Force


    Dr. Ley’s Psychology Today Blog


    3 Ways to Meet Your Partner’s Sexual Ideals and Why You Should


    Dr. Ley’s YouTube Channel


    On Katie Couric’s Show


    Other Research & Books


    Magnificent Sex: Lessons from Extraordinary Lovers by Kleinplatz & Menard

    Tell Me What You Want: The Science of Sexual Desire and How It Can Help Improve Your Sex Life by Lehmiller

    Sexual Addiction 25 Years On: A Systematic and Methodological Review of Empirical Literature and an Agenda for Future Research by Grubbs et al.

    The Prevalence of Paraphilic Interests and Behaviors in the General Population: A Provincial Survey by Joyal & Carpentier

    Concordance and Discordance between Paraphilic Interests and Behaviors: A Follow-Up Study by Joyal & Carpentier

    Moral Incongruence and Pornography Use: A Critical Review & Integration by Grubbs & Perry


    Past Psychodrama Podcast episode with Dr. Joshua Grubbs (Will Pandemic Porn Use Lead to Addiction?)

    • 1 hr 16 min
    Suicide Prevention for Trans & Gender Diverse Adults with Dr. Raymond Tucker

    Suicide Prevention for Trans & Gender Diverse Adults with Dr. Raymond Tucker

    Transgender and gender diverse people appear to be at higher risk for suicidal thoughts and behaviors than cisgender people. In this episode, Dr. Raymond Tucker shared what he has learned about this topic from his research with transgender and gender diverse veterans and civilians.  Importantly, he highlighted the limitations of the current literature by pointing to methodological challenges in the field. Dr. Tucker shared the psychological mediation framework to describe how external stressors (e.g., discrimination) influence internal experiences (e.g., shame) to impact mental health. He also described factors that seem to protect against suicide risk (e.g., chosen family, social support, equitable policies) and a transgender-affirming cognitive behavioral therapy adaptation for clinicians. We learned a lot from Dr. Tucker, and we hope you enjoy the episode. Thanks for listening!


     


    Dr. Raymond Tucker is a licensed clinical psychologist and assistant professor of psychology at Louisiana State University. His research and clinical work focus on the prevention of suicide, particularly in underserved communities. For more information about his important contributions to the field, check out his lab website and follow him on Twitter.


     


    Links Mentioned in the Episode:


    Trans Lifeline


    National Center for Transgender Equality


    World Professional Association for Transgender Health


    American Psychological Association Guidelines for Psychological Practice with Transgender and Gender


            Nonconforming People


    Suicide Prevention Information & Resources


    Fact-Checking 5 Suicide-Related Statements from a Viral Ben Shapiro Video


    The Suicidal Thoughts Workbook


    10 Tips for Writing

    • 1 hr 1 min
    Gender Diverse and Trans Youth Assessment and Treatment: Issues and controversies with Dr. Laura Edwards Leeper

    Gender Diverse and Trans Youth Assessment and Treatment: Issues and controversies with Dr. Laura Edwards Leeper

    We are back!  And we are very happy to bring this very interesting season 3 episode with Dr. Laura Edwards-Leeper.  


    Dr. Edwards-Leeper was the founding psychologist in the first youth transgender clinic in the United States — the first one to prescribe puberty blockers to transgender youth.


    Dr. Edwards-Leeper is Professor Emerita at Pacific University and is currently the chair of the Child and Adolescent Committee for the World Professional Association for Transgender Health (WPATH). She is heavily involved in the revision of the WPATH Standards of Care and served on the American Psychological Association subcommittee that developed guidelines for working with transgender individuals and on a Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) committee that created a consensus statement about the harm in using conversion therapy for LGBT youth.


    She has a private practice outside of Portland, OR where she works with transgender and gender diverse children, adolescents, and adults for therapy and assessment. She also provides consultation and training to providers and clinics around the country and internationally. She has multiple publications is often a go-to source for media outlets, including The New York Times, The Atlantic, the Washington Post, the BBC, and most recently, 60 Minutes.


     


    OTHER ARTICLES MENTIONED IN SHOW


    Individuals Treated for Gender Dysphoria with Medical and/or Surgical Transition Who Subsequently Detransitioned: A Survey of 100 Detransitioners. Littman L. (2021). Archives of Sexual Behavior. [link to paper].


    The Use of Methodologies in Littman (2018) Is Consistent with the Use of Methodologies in Other Studies Contributing to the Field of Gender Dysphoria Research: Response to Restar (2019). Littman L. (2020). Archives of Sexual Behavior. [link to paper]


    Restar A. J. (2020). Methodological Critique of Littman's (2018) Parental-Respondents Accounts of "Rapid-Onset Gender Dysphoria". Archives of sexual behavior, 49(1), 61–66. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10508-019-1453-2 [link to paper]


    Correction: Parent reports of adolescents and young adults perceived to show signs of a rapid onset of gender dysphoria. Littman L. (2019). PLOS ONE. [link to paper]


    Parent reports of adolescents and young adults perceived to show signs of a rapid onset of gender dysphoria. Littman L. (2018). PLOS ONE. [link to paper]

    • 1 hr 13 min
    Lived Experience of Mental Illness among Psychology Faculty and Trainees with Dr. Sarah Victor

    Lived Experience of Mental Illness among Psychology Faculty and Trainees with Dr. Sarah Victor

    We interviewed an expert guest, Dr. Sarah Victor, about the important topic of lived mental illness experience in the fields of clinical, counseling, and school psychology. Dr. Victor and her collaborators found that 82% of clinical, counseling, and school psychology faculty and trainees in their sample reported having lifetime mental health difficulties, while 48% reported that they had been formally diagnosed with a mental health condition in their lifetime. The empirical study was accompanied by a commentary paper that points to the importance of improving inclusivity in these fields through specific recommendations for change. Our discussion focused on barriers and reasons that stigma and prejudice persist even in fields that are supposed to know and do better. We concluded with Dr. Victor’s hopes for future directions in the field with regard to recognition and acceptance of lived mental illness experiences in clinical, counseling, and school psychology.


    About Our Expert Guest


    Dr. Sarah Victor (she/her) is an Assistant Professor of Psychological Sciences at Texas Tech University. Dr. Victor completed her undergraduate training in psychology at Stanford University (BA 2008) and her doctoral training in clinical psychology at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver (MA 2010, PhD 2017). Dr. Victor completed her doctoral internship and postdoctoral training in psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine (Western Psychiatric Hospital) prior to her faculty position.


    Dr. Victor is a clinical psychologist whose research and clinical work is focused on understanding and addressing non-suicidal self-injury and suicide. In her research, she uses ecological momentary assessment to examine real world predictors of self-injurious thoughts and behaviors as they occur in daily life. Her work is particularly focused on understanding these experiences in high-risk and marginalized groups, such as people leaving inpatient psychiatric treatment and transgender and gender diverse individuals. In addition, she conducts research and advocacy on psychologists and trainees with mental health difficulties, in the hopes of creating a more inclusive field with respect to these common and often stigmatized experiences.


    Links


    Follow Dr. Victor on Twitter and check out her website!

    The papers we discussed are:


    1) Only Human: Mental Health Difficulties among Clinical, Counseling, and School Psychology Faculty and Trainees


    2) Leveraging the Strengths of Psychologists with Lived Experience of Mental Illness


    Mental Health Resources

    Expert on Mental Illness Reveals Her Own Fight

    • 1 hr 6 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
23 Ratings

23 Ratings

Sally Spencer-Thomas ,

Suicidal Thoughts - tools to overcome

So grateful for Katie’s work on supporting people living with suicidal intensity. Very excited to get a copy of her new book “The Suicidal Thoughts Workbook” soon!

Msssmitty ,

A fun and informative podcast.

This podcast is everything I liked about psychology classes in school without the huge tuition bill. The hosts are very smart hut also have a charming sense of humor. Listening to the podcast is both relaxing and enjoyable.

Gianminni ,

Dynamic Duo

Was already a fan of Katherine Gordon from The Jedi Counsel, Leo is a great cohost and their personalities are both great. The simulatenous use of humor and simple terminology makes a highly academic podcast about psychology and society extreemely approachable and fun! Cant wait to hear more from this team!

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