18 episodes

CBC Radio's Quirks and Quarks covers the quirks of the expanding universe to the quarks within a single atom... and everything in between.

Quirks and Quarks from CBC Radio CBC

    • Science
    • 4.7 • 268 Ratings

CBC Radio's Quirks and Quarks covers the quirks of the expanding universe to the quarks within a single atom... and everything in between.

    Xenobot self-replication, red light for declining vision, water from the solar wind, exploring the mind-body link, and Deaf in science: beyond the range of hearing

    Xenobot self-replication, red light for declining vision, water from the solar wind, exploring the mind-body link, and Deaf in science: beyond the range of hearing

    Robots made from living cells have learned how to replicate themselves; Exposure to deep red light could help improve age-related vision declines; Solar wind and space dust may explain the presence of much of Earth’s water; Probing the mind-body connection to learn how the brain controls immune responses; Deaf researchers are bringing their unique perspective to the lab and the field.

    • 54 min
    Snapping science, male pregnant seahorse placentas, astronauts in Labrador, slacklining, skateboarding robot, aerosol COVID and Maori soot in Antarctica

    Snapping science, male pregnant seahorse placentas, astronauts in Labrador, slacklining, skateboarding robot, aerosol COVID and Maori soot in Antarctica

    Researchers studying finger snapping find it’s 20 times faster than the blink of an eye; Pregnant male seahorses grow a placenta to nurture their young; Why an ancient crater in Labrador is the perfect place for astronauts to train for a moon mission; An agile robot that can skateboard, slackline and even fly; This physicist knew years ago that infections like COVID-19 could be airborne; 700 years ago Maori land-clearing left a sooty signature in Antarctica, researchers find.

    • 54 min
    Finding the COVID resistors, Herzberg gold medal winner, green glitter, smashing an asteroid, why we have ‘Useful Delusions,’ and mosquito size questions

    Finding the COVID resistors, Herzberg gold medal winner, green glitter, smashing an asteroid, why we have ‘Useful Delusions,’ and mosquito size questions

    Scientists trying to understand the people COVID-19 can’t touch; Trapping light earns physicist Sajeev John Canada's most prestigious science prize; Glitter comes in many colours, but this scientists is making a green alternative; NASA is smashing a spacecraft into an asteroid to test a planetary defense system; Why 'Useful Delusions' can sometimes make us vulnerable to misinformation; Why are mosquitoes larger in the spring than in the fall?

    • 54 min
    Vaccine prevents cervical cancer, Atacama comet evidence, bees sound the alarm, cane toad cannibalism and 100th anniversary of insulin.

    Vaccine prevents cervical cancer, Atacama comet evidence, bees sound the alarm, cane toad cannibalism and 100th anniversary of insulin.

    HPV vaccine works ‘remarkably well’ to prevent cancer, according to UK study; 12000 years ago an exploding comet turned part of a desert into glass; Asian honeybees sound a screamy alarm when murder hornets attack; Cane toad tadpoles in Australia are cannibalizing smaller cane toad hatchlings; 100 years of insulin: how researchers are hoping to ditch the needles, once and for all.

    • 54 min
    Whale appetites feed ocean ecosystems, water vapour and climate change, sabre-tooth sociability, shedding light on bioluminescence

    Whale appetites feed ocean ecosystems, water vapour and climate change, sabre-tooth sociability, shedding light on bioluminescence

    Baleen whales eat much more than we thought — and fertilize the oceans doing it; Understanding the most important greenhouse gas — water vapour; Fossil evidence suggests sabre-tooth cats cared for each other when injured; Deep-sea pioneer looks back on a career chasing light in the deep, dark ocean; Do plants ever mimic other plants?

    • 54 min
    Black spruce and the boreal forest, mystery mummies from china, going deep on the great red spot, ants with metal mandibles and Andrew Weaver, political scientist, on COP26

    Black spruce and the boreal forest, mystery mummies from china, going deep on the great red spot, ants with metal mandibles and Andrew Weaver, political scientist, on COP26

    Fire ordinarily helps the boreal's black spruce trees. Now it threatens them too; ‘Culturally cosmopolitan’ Bronze Age mummies found in China have surprising origins; Scientists peer into the depths of Jupiter’s Great Red Spot; Metal impregnated mandibles give these ants a razor-sharp bite; Andew Weaver, Canadian climate scientist turned-politician, on COP26.

    • 54 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
268 Ratings

268 Ratings

7asafdrgfd ,

I’m 7 years old and I love it

I like to listen too it wen I go to sleep

bm289458696 ,

Best Science Podcast Ever

This podcast is outstanding. Bob is the best interviewer out there and you can trust him to ask the best questions. Intelligent, trustworthy, and they go right to the source of the discoveries and stories. A science journalism.

littlest cowboy ,

Dull

Black Birders beware

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