25 episodes

Radio Cade is a podcast brought to you by the Cade Museum for Creativity and Invention in Gainesville, Florida. Radio Cade introduces listeners to inventors and their sources of motivation and inspiration. Learn about their personal stories, how their inventions work, and how their ideas get from the laboratory to the marketplace.

Radio Cade Radio Cade

    • Science
    • 5.0 • 10 Ratings

Radio Cade is a podcast brought to you by the Cade Museum for Creativity and Invention in Gainesville, Florida. Radio Cade introduces listeners to inventors and their sources of motivation and inspiration. Learn about their personal stories, how their inventions work, and how their ideas get from the laboratory to the marketplace.

    CEO 101: Craig Bandes and Financial Strategy

    CEO 101: Craig Bandes and Financial Strategy

    Craig Bandes discusses how to avoid the same pitfalls of companies he has worked with in the past and how to create a structurally sound order of operations through his experience in business and finances: "And you get to a point where you just realize that if I don't try it, I'll never know, and I'll always regret it. And then you jump into it . But jumping in with more experience, I think, really increases the odds of surviving".Craig Bandes is the CEO and co-founder of Pixelligent Technologies. He has over 25 years of experience serving as a CEO, entrepreneur, and angel investor. Additionally, he is a member of the NanoBusiness Alliance Advisory Board.
    In this episode, Bandes shares with host James Di Virgilio the importance of having a business background before entering the business world, how he's saved a company from bankruptcy, and the next steps for said company in terms of workplace diversity, globalization, and sustainability.
     
    TRANSCRIPT:
    Intro: 0:01
    Inventors and their inventions. Welcome to Radio Cade -- a podcast from the Cade Museum for Creativity and Invention in Gainesville, Florida. Starting in running your own company -- it's not for everyone. For those who have done it, it can be exhilarating, exhausting, and easily the hardest thing they've ever done. We decided to go out and talk to some of those people and find out what they've learned, what they'd repeat, what they'll never do again, or hear stories from their first year, then from the period when they realized they're going to survive and how they intend to position their companies for the future. We'll find out what a CEO's normal day is like, how they build and manage their teams, what it's done to their personal lives. And finally, when is it time to move on? Join us for CEO101 -- a limited series of deep looks at people who are their own boss -- for better or for worse.
    James Di Virgilio: 0:54
    We're talking with Craig Bandes, the president and CEO of Pixelligent Technologies. It's a nanotechnology company that does a whole lot of fascinating things that Craig is going to tell us all about. But first, Craig, tell us about your background as a leader. You've done a lot of things -- both co-founding companies, as well as being brought in to be a CEO.
    Craig Bandes: 1:14
    Yeah. Well, great. Thanks for inviting me to join today. So, you know , I think it's , it's nothing that I think you can prepare for without being in the role. There's so much of it that you figure out as you go. There's definitely taking advantage of books on leadership or being mentored by others that have come before you, but there's nothing like being in it to really make all the mistakes, hopefully learn from them, and start to formulate what you think is a, a good compilation of strategies, right? There's not just one that I think makes a leader, or a CEO, successful.
    James Di Virgilio: 1:45
    Give us a little bit about your, just, biography, sort of the companies that you've led. Give us a CV here.
    Craig Bandes: 1:51
    So, very different companies, very different industries. The first company I co-founded with a partner was in IT staffing and consulting -- and that was an area where he had slightly more experience than I did in it. And we were big users of those, sort of resources and vendors when we're both working together as executives in a telecom company, which [inaudible] many back around the uh, circa 2000, didn't work out after raising lots and lots of money -- which was my main job when I was there. And so we started it together, and it was not my lifelong dream to do it, but I had more entrepreneurial background than he d

    • 37 min
    CEO 101: Weaver Gaines and Growing a Company

    CEO 101: Weaver Gaines and Growing a Company

    Weaver Gaines shares his experiences as the CEO of several startup companies in terms of the highs, the lows, the expected, and the unexpected: "So I think you can inculcate a culture from the top, from the beginning, that says, 'We don't lie. We don't cheat. We don't steal. And we're not going to tolerate people who do those things.' You can make that happen throughout your company, regardless of its size. But the other stuff, the commitment to the task, the belief in what you're doing, all of that stuff, has to be established when the company is small and then you hope it will permeate the company as it grows."Gaines has served as the CEO of Evren Technologies, OBMedical Company and Ixion Biotechnology. Additionally he has been the chairman of several companies and non-profits, and is a member of the Keck Graduate Institute's Corporate Relations Board.In this episode, Weaver shares with host Richard Miles the importance of a CEO's role to encourage teamwork, foster trust in a company, and grow -- in a way that's not just about the money. 
     
    TRANSCRIPT:
    Intro: 0:01
    Inventors and their inventions. Welcome to Radio Cade, a podcast from the Cade Museum for Creativity and Invention in Gainesville, Florida. Starting in running your own company -- It's not for everyone. For those who have done it, it can be exhilarating, exhausting, and easily the hardest thing they've ever done. We decided to go out and talk to some of those people and find out what they've learned, what they'd repeat, what they'll never do again, or hear stories from their first year, then from the period when they realized they're going to survive and how they intend to position their companies for the future. We'll find out what a CEO's normal day is like, how they build and manage their teams, what it's done to their personal lives. And finally, when is it time to move on? Join us for CEO 101, a limited series of deep looks at people who are their own boss -- for better or for worse. Welcome to another episode of CEO 101, a series of special episodes in which we talk to and about CEOs of startup companies. I'm your host, Richard Miles. Today my guest is Weaver Gaines , the CEO of several companies, including Evren Technologies, OBMedical, both of those are medical device companies, as well as Ixion Biotechnology. He's also served as a chairman of numerous companies and non-profits, among other things. Welcome to the show, Weaver.
    Weaver Gaines: 1:18
    "Well, thank you for having me here," I think is the formulaic response to--
    Richard Miles: 1:22
    That's right, there's only one right answer. You're not going to be here. Weaver, you've done a lot of stuff in your life and your career. So why don't we just start with a short overview of your career?
    Weaver Gaines: 1:31
    Okay. Well, one way of thinking about my career is, "here's a guy who obviously can't keep a job." I went to law school primarily because even though I was an ROTC commissioned officer, everybody else was trying to avoid being drafted into the war in Vietnam. And they were all going to law school and they were on the debate team at Dartmouth, so I went to law school too , with about that much forethought about it. And when I graduated from law school, I went on active duty and I spent two years in the army -- one year in Europe, in Heidelberg and Berlin. And one year in long been Vietnam -- an experience for which I will be always grateful. The whole experience was extraordinary. I'm glad I did it. I can't talk anybody into doing it now, but I think it's really one of the formative experiences of my life. And I'm glad I got involved in it.
    Richard Miles: 2:17

    • 39 min
    CEO 101: Vinny Olmstead and Funding an Idea

    CEO 101: Vinny Olmstead and Funding an Idea

    As a first-time founder and CEO, guest Vinny Olmstead reflects on what it felt like to start something new: “The one word I would use is just excitement. If you were taking a picture, I think you would see wide eyes and a smile on my face... In my early days, as I was looking at opportunities, I was hyper focused on solving some type of problem and spending a good amount of time to figure out what the solution would be for that type of problem.”Olmstead is the Co-Founder, Managing Director, and Partner at Vocap Investment Partners based in Vero Beach, Florida. Prior to Vocap, Olmstead was CEO of Bridgevine, an advertising technology company focused on customer acquisition.In this episode, Olmstead talks with host James Di Virgilio about his experience as a CEO and investor, and to share his advice for entrepreneurs that are trying to rise above the crowd to get funding. 
     
    TRANSCRIPT:
    Intro : 0:01
    Inventors and their inventions. Welcome to Radio Cade the podcast from the Cade Museum for Creativity and Invention in Gainesville, Florida. Starting and running your own company. It's not for everyone for those who have done it, it can be exhilarating, exhausting, and easily the hardest thing they've ever done. We decided to go out and talk to some of those people and find out what they've learned, what they'd repeat, what they'll never do again. We'll hear stories from their first year, then from the period, when they realize they're going to survive and how they intend to position their companies for the future, we'll find out what a CEO's normal day days like, how they build and manage their teams, what it's done to their personal lives. And finally, when is the time to move on, join us for CEO 101, a limited series of deep looks at people who are their own boss for better or for worse. This episode of Radio Cade, CEO101 features and interview Vinny Olmstead, Managing Director of the Florida based venture capital firm, Vocap Partners.
    James Di Virgilio: 0:59
    Vinny, take me back to a time that was a first time for you, either as a company, founder, CEO, whatever you feel like was kind of that first experience. And describe for me what it was like to start something.
    Vinny Olmstead: 1:13
    The one word I would use is just excitement. If you were taking a picture, I think you would see wide eyes and a smile on my face. And if you peel back the onion on that a little bit, in my early days, as I was looking at opportunities, I was hyper focused on solving some type of problem and spending a good amount of time trying to figure out what the solution would be for that type of problem. And I'm sure at one point it will get into learnings and how that evolves. But early on it's a lot of them spend time doing some research. I came up through the finance rings . So a lot of times finance people think about businesses through the lens of Excel and spreadsheets, a little different than engineers do sometimes a little different than sales folks do at times, but me personally, came up through the finance route. So a lot of what I did was think through business model think through pricing, think through the market and those types of things, and try to think about how that solution could grow into something very large. And without knowing it , trying to take a look at competition and find to look at where the needs here . So I answered the question in a couple of ways, which is facial expression. And then a little bit of experience probably on and through the prism of CEO, that has a finance background, which is sometimes good. And sometimes it needs to be complimented.
    James Di Virgilio: 2:31
    So you had mentioned very early on, I know

    • 41 min
    CEO 101: Ron Tarro and the Idea of Business

    CEO 101: Ron Tarro and the Idea of Business

    On what it’s like becoming the CEO of a startup and gradually having more and more employees taking over some of the day-to-day responsibilities, guest Ron Tarro says the following: “It’s almost better to view what you’re building as a machine; it’s a machine where, if you actually step back from it, the machine keeps running.” Tarro is the former CEO of a telecommunications software and management services company founded in Boca Raton, Florida. His own experience of developing a startup led him to becoming the Vice President of the Board of Directors at New World Angels, a group of 78 accredited, private investors, operators and entrepreneurs dedicated to providing equity capital and guidance to early-stage entrepreneurial companies with a strong presence in Florida. 
    In this episode, Tarro sits down with host Richard Miles to talk about his own trials of creating a startup, as well as discussing the importance of intellectualizing business as one forges their own path within the marketplace.
     
    TRANSCRIPT:
    Intro (00:01):
    Starting and running your own company. It's not for everyone, but for those who have done it, it can be exhilarating, exhausting, and easily the hardest thing they've ever done. So we decided to go on and talk to some of those people and find out what they've learned, what they'd repeat and what they'll never do again. We'll hear stories from their first year, then from the period when they realized they're going to survive and how they intend to position their companies for the future. We'll find out what a CEO's normal day is like, how they build and manage their teams, what it's done to their personal lives. And finally, when is it time to move on? Join us for CEO 101, a limited series of deep looks at people who are their own boss, for better or for worse.
    Richard Miles (00:38):
    Welcome to another episode of CEO 101, a series of special episodes in which we talk to, and about, CEOs of startup companies. I'm your host Richard Miles today. My guest is Ron Tarro, CEO of a number of companies, as well as an advisor and investor in many more. Welcome to the show, Ron.
    Ron Tarro (00:55):
    It's very nice to be here. Thanks for having me.
    Richard Miles (00:57):
    So why don't we start with an overview of your career. You've done a lot of things. We just were talking about your role in a number of companies at various stages and levels. So why don't you give a brief summary of where you started and what you're doing now?
    Ron Tarro (01:09):
    Yeah, so I started as a nerd, software engineer, and I really came through a technical track. My background was in mathematics and the sciences. I ended up getting hired by IBM in IBM labs and so was on product teams, software engineering teams. Went through product marketing and product management jobs there, where I began to focus, not just on making the

    • 31 min
    CEO 101: Lew Dickey and the Realm of Radio

    CEO 101: Lew Dickey and the Realm of Radio

    Recalling his time in the radio business, guest Lew Dickey tells host James Di Virgilio that, as a CEO, it is important to recognize that you are often forced to take things as you go: “The landscape is changing—you might be able to see a little bit around the corner, but nobody has perfect vision into the future.” Currently, Dickey is the Co-Founder and Chairman of DM Luxury, America’s largest regional magazine company. However, this piece of advice rings especially true considering his background as the former CEO of Cumulus Media, the nation’s second largest radio company.
    In this episode, Dickey remembers the quick and drastic shift into the digital realm, a time when somebody like Steve Jobs showed up to Stanford University with his latest Apple products and showed them to eager students, including Dickey, who took inspiration from those moments—as well his own father’s history in broadcasting—to create his own company.
     
    TRANSCRIPT:
    Intro: (00:01)Starting and running your own company. It's not for everyone, but for those who have done it, it can be exhilarating, exhausting, and easily the hardest thing they've ever done. So we decided to go on and talk to some of those people and find out what they've learned, what they'd repeat and what they'll never do again. We'll hear stories from their first year, then from the period when they realized they're going to survive and how they intend to position their companies for the future. We'll find out what a CEO's normal day is like, how they build and manage their teams, what it's done to their personal lives. And finally, when is it time to move on? Joining us for CEO 101, a limited series of deep looks at people who are their own boss, for better or for worse. Intro: (00:40)Today's guest CEO, Lew Dickey came to prominence as co-founder and CEO of Atlanta-based Cumulus Media, the nation's second largest radio company. He is also the co-founder and chairman of DM Luxury, America's largest regional magazine company. James Di Virgilio: (00:56)Lew, take us back to your first year, starting your venture. How did it feel to take on such a role and how did that necessitate some changes in your life?  Lew Dickey: (01:05)It's interesting because I had a market research business that I was running and had started that when I got out of school back in 1985, and that business I was working for all the major television groups and radio groups across the country doing market research and strategy consulting. My sort of purview was nationwide. I was operating in dozens and dozens of markets from the largest to the smallest providing consulting services and market research, consumer insights. So I understood the landscape and I knew a lot of the owners and managers across the country. And I was doing some work for early stage venture capitalists that own some stations in the Caribbean, and they were a mess and I was down there helping this person try to get them figured out. And I was talking about the telco act, which had just passed. This was in 1996, the telco act that had passe

    • 29 min
    CEO 101: Rick Carlson and SharpSpring

    CEO 101: Rick Carlson and SharpSpring

    When Rick Carlson founded SharpSpring in 2012, he didn't think of himself as a CEO.  “My co-founder and I were doing whatever it took to survive,” Carlson says, and they were responsible for everything from software development to buying office supplies. In the early days of the automated marketing software company, “there were so many failures it was hard to name them all,” according to Carlson.  “There was an immense amount of wasted effort in figuring out what customers wanted. Over the years we think we’ve gotten smarter about how we make those decisions.”  The company went public in 2014, after being acquired by SMTP, and is currently listed on the NASDAQ.  
     
    TRANSCRIPT:
    Intro (00:01):
    Inventors and their inventions. Welcome to Radio Cade, a podcast from the Cade Museum for Creativity and Invention in Gainesville, Florida. The museum is named after James Robert Cade, who invented Gatorade in 1965. My name is Richard Miles. We'll introduce you to inventors and the things that motivate them, we'll learn about their personal stories, how their inventions work, and how their ideas get from the laboratory to the marketplace. Starting and running your own company: it's not for everyone, but for those who have done it, it can be exhilarating, exhausting, and easily the hardest thing they've ever done. So we decided to go out and talk to some of those people and find out what they've learned, what they'd repeat, and what they'll never do again. We'll hear stories from their first year, then from the period when they realized they're going to survive, and how they intend to position their companies for the future. We'll find out what a CEO's normal day's like, how they build and manage their teams, what it's done to their personal lives. And finally, when is the time to move on? Join us for CEO 101, a limited series of deep looks at people who are their own boss for better or for worse. This episode's guest is Rick Carlson, CEO of SharpSpring, a comprehensive sales and marketing automation platform.
    Richard Miles (01:25):
    Rick, welcome to the show. Glad to have you on to get your experiences as CEO of SharpSpring. We're going to start by talking about the very beginning. So if you could take us back literally to your first year, really your first few days as CEO, and let's get a snapshot for people who've never done this before, what that is like. And obviously, you put in work before you probably became a CEO into the company, the idea, but let's start with the first 30 days. You've got your company, it started, maybe it's just you, maybe you have a handful of employees. What was that experience like?
    Rick Carlson (01:56):
    First off, thanks so much for having me, appreciate the opportunity and I'm glad to be here. So when I heard you pose the question, your first day as CEO, actually what immediately came to mind is during that first year or even two years, or maybe three years, I certainly did not think of myself as a CEO. CEO is what I am now managing a very large team with managers and a couple of hundred people. When I think about that first year, I think about struggling with a fledgling team where I am just another team member, and that's exactly what it was like. I was a founder of a business, much more than a

    • 28 min

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Insightful and interesting interviews with talented entrepreneurs and inventors. Filled with business-inventive wisdom and interesting stories in the ups and downs of entrepreneurship.

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