222 episodes

Dedicated to the promotion of a free and virtuous society, Acton Line brings together writers, economists, religious leaders, and more to bridge the gap between good intentions and sound economics. 
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Acton Line Acton Institute

    • Education

Dedicated to the promotion of a free and virtuous society, Acton Line brings together writers, economists, religious leaders, and more to bridge the gap between good intentions and sound economics. 
For information regarding your data privacy, visit Acast.com/privacy

    How to talk about rights in our polarized age

    How to talk about rights in our polarized age

    Today, our most contentious controversies are about morality. We disagree about questions of efficiency and democracy, but across political aisles, we also disagree about what's right to do and who we're becoming as a people. How can we have productive debates with people whose worldviews are very different from ours? Adam MacLeod, professor of law at Faulkner University, addresses this question in his new book titled "The Age of Selfies: Reasoning About Rights When the Stakes Are Personal." In this conversation, Adam examines the roots of our disagreements and proposes a way to provide a more secure foundation for civil rights.
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    • 33 min
    A hopeful message in a time of crisis from Rev. Robert Sirico

    A hopeful message in a time of crisis from Rev. Robert Sirico

    In this episode, Acton's President and Co-Founder, Rev. Robert Sirico, offers some thoughts on what the role of the government should be during a crisis. When we're confronted with unique crises, especially like the Coronavirus pandemic the world is facing now, there are justified government interventions. We can't discount, however, the principle of subsidiarity as well as the division of labor and voluntary action. How can we wisely approach these principles in the reality of our current context? Rev. Sirico explains.
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    • 18 min
    How Communist China's virus coverup caused a pandemic

    How Communist China's virus coverup caused a pandemic

    As of March 18, 2020 Coronavirus, or COVID-19, which originated in Wuhan, China, has infected over 200,000 people worldwide, and has killed more than 8,000 people globally. What responsive measures should have been taken by China that weren't? How did the People's Republic of China put the world in danger by failing the people of Wuhan, and who in China risked their lives and even the lives of their family members to raise the alarm for your sake? Helen Raleigh, a senior contributor at The Federalist, answers.
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    • 30 min
    Rebroadcast: Samuel Gregg on the life and impact of Michael Novak

    Rebroadcast: Samuel Gregg on the life and impact of Michael Novak

    It’s now been three years since Michael Novak passed away. Novak was Roman Catholic theologian, philosopher and author, and was a powerful defender of human liberty. In this episode, Acton's Samuel Gregg shares Novak’s history, starting with his time on the left in the 1960s and 70s and recounting his gradual shift toward conservative thought that culminated in the publication of his 1982 masterwork, "The Spirit of Democratic Capitalism." In this book, Novak grounded a defense for a free market in Judeo-Christianity, influencing how many Protestants and Catholics thought about economics. As Gregg recently wrote, “No religious intellectual can match Novak’s influence in facilitating this transformation through the written word in America and throughout the world.”
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    • 33 min
    The biggest problems of national conservatism

    The biggest problems of national conservatism

    In recent years, a rift has opened within American conservatism, a series of divisions animated in part by the 2016 presidential election and also by a right concern with an increasingly progressive culture. Among these divisions is a growing split between self-professing liberal and illiberal conservatives as some on the right scramble to give explanation for a culture which has become hostile to civil society and traditional institutions, most notably the family. One movement which has grown out of this divide is national conservatism, embodied by the launch of the first National Conservatism Conference last year and in the words of its proponents including Patrick Deneen, Yoram Hazony and Michael Anton. What defines national conservatism and what, ultimately, do national conservatives want? Stephanie Slade, managing editor at Reason magazine, breaks it down.
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    • 29 min
    The man vs. the myth: who was John Foster Dulles?

    The man vs. the myth: who was John Foster Dulles?

    If you've traveled to Washington, D.C. before, it's likely that you've flown through Washington Dulles International Airport, named after President Eisenhower's Secretary of State, John Foster Dulles. In fact, over 60,000 people travel through Dulles airport every day, but not many people know much about its namesake. John Foster Dulles served in the early years of the Cold War and pursued a vigorous foreign policy meant to isolate and undermine international and expansionist Communism. Undergirding his foreign policy was a commitment to natural law, a realistic understanding of human nature and a clear vision of freedom. Since his death in 1959, Dulles has been characterized only as a dour, puritanical and simple man. Joining the podcast today to shed more light on the life of Dulles is John D. Wilsey, associate professor of church history at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. In this conversation, John brings perspective to Dulles' legacy, uncovering both his public and private life, and showing how simple explanations of Dulles just don't help us accurately understand the man or his times.
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    • 46 min

Customer Reviews

DCHCPA ,

Outstanding!

Great quality, fantastic podcast!

Be a Triz ,

Amazon,

By the way, James Lovelock is not dead. Just celebrated his 100th bday. See the Delingpole podcast of Oct. this year.

Nadafacade ,

Always Informative and Engaging!

Really appreciate Acton Institute’s official podcast. The topics are timely and well researched, and host, Caroline Roberts brings energy and levity to each and every episode.

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