148 episodes

A two-time Peabody Award-winner, Radiolab is an investigation told through sounds and stories, and centered around one big idea. In the Radiolab world, information sounds like music and science and culture collide. Hosted by Jad Abumrad and Robert Krulwich, the show is designed for listeners who demand skepticism, but appreciate wonder.
WNYC Studios is a listener-supported producer of other leading podcasts including On the Media, Snap Judgment, Death, Sex & Money, Nancy and Here’s the Thing with Alec Baldwin.
© WNYC Studios

Radiolab WNYC

    • Documentary

A two-time Peabody Award-winner, Radiolab is an investigation told through sounds and stories, and centered around one big idea. In the Radiolab world, information sounds like music and science and culture collide. Hosted by Jad Abumrad and Robert Krulwich, the show is designed for listeners who demand skepticism, but appreciate wonder.
WNYC Studios is a listener-supported producer of other leading podcasts including On the Media, Snap Judgment, Death, Sex & Money, Nancy and Here’s the Thing with Alec Baldwin.
© WNYC Studios

    The Other Latif: Episode 3

    The Other Latif: Episode 3

    The Other Latif

    Radiolab’s Latif Nasser always believed his name was unique, singular, completely his own. Until one day when he makes a bizarre and shocking discovery. He shares his name with another man: Abdul Latif Nasser, detainee 244 at Guantanamo Bay. The U.S. government paints a terrifying picture of The Other Latif as Al-Qaeda’s top explosives expert, and one of the most important advisors to Osama bin Laden. Nasser’s lawyer claims that he was at the wrong place at the wrong time, and that he was never even in Al-Qaeda. This clash leads Radiolab’s Latif into a years-long investigation, picking apart evidence, attempting to separate fact from fiction, and trying to uncover what this man actually did or didn’t do. Along the way, Radiolab’s Latif reflects on American values and his own religious past, and wonders how his namesake, a fellow nerdy, suburban Muslim kid, may have gone down such a strikingly different path.

     

    Episode 3: Sudan

    Latif turns his focus to Sudan, where his namesake spent time working on a sunflower farm. What could be suspicious about that?  Latif scrutinizes the evidence to try to discover whether - as Abdul Latif’s lawyer insists - it was just an innocent clerical job, or - as the government alleges - it was where he decided to become an extremist fighter.  

    This episode was produced by Suzie Lechtenberg, Sarah Qari, and Latif Nasser. With help from Niza Nondo and Maaki Monem. Fact checking by Diane Kelly and Margot Williams. Editing by Jad Abumrad and Soren Wheeler. Original music by Jad Abumrad, Alex Overington, Jeremy Bloom, and Amino Belyamani. 

    Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate. 

    • 36 min
    The Other Latif: Episode 2

    The Other Latif: Episode 2

    The Other Latif

    Radiolab’s Latif Nasser always believed his name was unique, singular, completely his own. Until one day when he makes a bizarre and shocking discovery. He shares his name with another man: Abdul Latif Nasser, detainee 244 at Guantanamo Bay. The U.S. government paints a terrifying picture of The Other Latif as Al-Qaeda’s top explosives expert, and one of the most important advisors to Osama bin Laden. Nasser’s lawyer claims that he was at the wrong place at the wrong time, and that he was never even in Al-Qaeda. This clash leads Radiolab’s Latif into a years-long investigation, picking apart evidence, attempting to separate fact from fiction, and trying to uncover what this man actually did or didn’t do. Along the way, Radiolab’s Latif reflects on American values and his own religious past, and wonders how his namesake, a fellow nerdy, suburban Muslim kid, may have gone down such a strikingly different path.

     

    Episode 2: Morocco

    Latif travels to Abdul Latif’s hometown of Casablanca, Morocco, to try and find out: was he radicalized? And if so, how? Latif begins by visiting the man’s family, but the family’s reaction to him gets complicated as Latif digs for the truth. He finds out surprising information on a political group Abdul Latif joined in his youth, his alleged onramp to extremism. Tensions escalate when Latif realizes he’s being tailed. 

    Read more about Abdul Latif Nasser at the New York Times’ Guantanamo Docket. 

    This episode was produced by Sarah Qari, Suzie Lechtenberg, and Latif Nasser. With help from Tarik El Barakah and Amira Karaoud. Fact checking by Diane Kelly and Margot Williams. Editing by Jad Abumrad and Soren Wheeler. Original music by Jad Abumrad, Alex Overington, and Amino Belyamani. 

    Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate. 

    • 46 min
    The Other Latif: Episode 1

    The Other Latif: Episode 1

    The Other Latif

    Radiolab’s Latif Nasser always believed his name was unique, singular, completely his own. Until one day when he makes a bizarre and shocking discovery. He shares his name with another man: Abdul Latif Nasser, detainee 244 at Guantanamo Bay. The U.S. government paints a terrifying picture of The Other Latif as Al-Qaeda’s top explosives expert, and one of the most important advisors to Osama bin Laden. Nasser’s lawyer claims that he was at the wrong place at the wrong time, and that he was never even in Al-Qaeda. This clash leads Radiolab’s Latif into a years-long investigation, picking apart evidence, attempting to separate fact from fiction, and trying to uncover what this man actually did or didn’t do. Along the way, Radiolab’s Latif reflects on American values and his own religious past, and wonders how his namesake, a fellow nerdy, suburban Muslim kid, may have gone down such a strikingly different path.

     

    Episode 1: My Namesake

    We hear the evidence against Abdul Latif Nasser -- at least the evidence that has been leaked or declassified -- and we meet Shelby Sullivan-Bennis, his attorney, who contests more or less every government claim against him. Sullivan-Bennis walks us through the excruciating process that came close to releasing Abdul Latif Nasser in the waning days of the Obama administration, but fell apart at the last minute. He is now technically a free man -- he was cleared for transfer home in 2016 -- yet he remains stuck at Guantanamo Bay, thanks in part to a Presidential Tweet.

    Read more about Abdul Latif Nasser at the New York Times’ Guantanamo Docket. 

    This episode was produced by Annie McEwen, Latif Nasser, Sarah Qari, and Suzie Lechtenberg. Fact checking by Diane Kelly and Margot Williams. Editing by Jad Abumrad and Soren Wheeler. Original music by Jad Abumrad, Alex Overington, Annie McEwen, and Amino Belyamani. 

    Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate. 

    • 41 min
    The Bobbys

    The Bobbys

    On the occasion of his retirement as cohost of Radiolab, Robert sat down with Jad to reflect on his long and storied career in radio and television, and their work together over the past decade and a half. And we pay tribute to Robert, inspired by a peculiar tradition of his.

    This episode was produced by Matt Kielty. Sound design & mix by Jeremy Bloom.

    Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate. 

    • 48 min
    Body Count

    Body Count

    Right now, at this very moment, all across the planet, there are 7.6 billion human beings eating, breathing, sleeping, brushing their teeth, walking their dogs, drinking coffee, walking down the street or running onto the subway or hopping in their car, maybe reading a summary of a podcast they’re about to hit play on … and the number is only going up. Everyday 386,000 babies are born (16,000 an hour). We’re adding a billion new people every 12 years.

    So here’s a question you’ve probably never thought about: Are there more people alive right now than have ever lived on the planet in history? Do the living outnumber the dead? Robert got obsessed with this odd question, and in this episode we bring you the answer. Or, well, answers.

    This episode was reported by Robert Krulwich and produced by Annie McEwen and Pat Walters, with help from Neel Dhanesha. Fact-checking by Michelle Harris. Music and mixing by Jeremy Bloom. Special thanks to Jeffrey Dobereiner.

    Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate. 

    • 45 min
    60 Words

    60 Words

    This hour we pull apart one sentence, written in the hours after September 11th, 2001, that has led to the longest war in U.S. history. We examine how just 60 words of legal language have blurred the line between war and peace.

    • 1 hr 4 min

Customer Reviews

ADDaD ,

It's hard to estimate the value of this podcast

This podcast stands out as pretty much constantly astounding. As someone who writes about science for a living, the 'scientific' concepts here are rendered in an enviably fascinating and pretty much idiot-proof way. It's a testament to the skills of the hosts in their use of the audio format that they can cruise through really complex stuff and give the ordinary listener entertainment and learning in a single scoop. This is the best. Now if they would only get season one on itunes....

gabgilb ,

The Other Latif

This series is amazing! The twists and turns are so well laid out; the time, effort, and attentions to detail paid in making this series are so Apparent! Thank you so much✨

chris03210372 ,

The Latif Nasser Comedy Hour

“Working for Osama Bin Ladin in the Sudan was basically as harmless and innocent and harmless as working the cash register at Wendy’s”... “Just because he ran into Osama Bin Ladin every once in awhile at work and said “hello” to him in passing, doesn’t make Latif a terrorist”.... Latif goes from becoming a member of an anti-government group in Morocco, to working directly for Bin Ladin, the entire time, the reporter claims that in his opinion, this is in no way suspicious and is only an effort to “help other Muslims”. It wasn’t until halfway through the first episode that I realized that the other Latif was being serious about this story. For someone who says their undergrad is in Islamic Studies, it amazes me how naive he is. I will say that I owe my life to the good Muslims who pointed to their eye and took me to their heart. So I do believe and have experienced that the vast majority of the worlds Muslims are good, kind, loving, family oriented people. But this “other Latif” from Canada is so out of touch that he doesn’t even seem to be aware of his own culture. Not aware of the process of Wahabi Mindset indoctrination. Not aware of the tactics, techniques and procedures that are taught and used by terrorist groups to avoid detection by integration into refugee populations for the purpose of manipulating ngo’s and gaining access to money and resources, and tapping into the malleable minds of the disaffected youth. In the meantime, the other Latif actually condemns the US, while traveling overseas, (to a part of the world that has ongoing issues with terrorist groups) while in the process of his own application for US Citizenship. I mean, it’s literally like a poorly written comedy sketch. The nature of my work takes me to that region, for that reason, I learned to read, write and speak Foss-Ha Arabic fluently. I’m not an Arab, but it’s hard for me to believe how disconnected the other Latif is. Also how bias his reporting is. I mean, to know that little about the culture, then AFTER this guys family brings you into their home and makes you a part of their family, that’s when you feel it’s the right time to say “hey, so like, was your brother a terrorist or what?”. I mean, if I was there interpreting for you, I would’ve started laughing. After I realized you were serious, I would refuse to relay that question, then tell you I need to teach you about Islam and Arab culture.

That in mind, in complete contrast, the podcast about what’s going on in Gabon, was brilliant. Opened my eyes to Gabon and other countries in that region like Angola, where the most extreme corruption practices are going on. The podcast about the
“Man VS Horse” race in Arizona, made me forget about the world around me, and in my mind, I was there, in the race with the runners. Lastly, the podcast about the sacred Native American pot, that the guys chose to leave, untouched, then travel back with their families to try and find it. Man, that is one of my favorite stories of all time.

Top Podcasts In Documentary

Listeners Also Subscribed To

More by WNYC