18 episodes

Raising Primates is a podcast interested in the intersection of culture and parenting practices around the world. We'll explore our past as a species, as well as cultures around the world today, in hopes of making sense of this thing we call "parenting".
Join us for interviews with anthropologists, social scientists, and other researchers/authors as we discover where we came from and where we're going.
Become a PATREON to support our efforts:
www.patreon.com/raisingprimates

Visit us online: www.raisingprimates.com

Raising Primates Megan McCue

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.3, 72 Ratings

Raising Primates is a podcast interested in the intersection of culture and parenting practices around the world. We'll explore our past as a species, as well as cultures around the world today, in hopes of making sense of this thing we call "parenting".
Join us for interviews with anthropologists, social scientists, and other researchers/authors as we discover where we came from and where we're going.
Become a PATREON to support our efforts:
www.patreon.com/raisingprimates

Visit us online: www.raisingprimates.com

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5
72 Ratings

72 Ratings

Tegd1rb ,

I commend your ability to evolve this podcast

I have been listening to the podcast from the beginning as I am a first time mom too and resonated with attachment parenting prior to giving birth at home. I just finished you’re breaking up with attachment parenting episode. I am left with mixed feelings. I do feel like along the way I have been shamed by some of your episodes namely because I had to return to work once my leave was up at four months postpartum. I recall one episode where the tone about putting your child in daycare was a form of torture which left a lasting impression on me. I do believe you have since removed that episode so I commend you for that. I also commend you for your vulnerability during this most recent episode because I feel like some of the things that you said were not easy for you. I do find your ability to grow and change your opinion as a new mom remarkable. However, I am curious about a few things that you said regarding there being no science behind the attachment parenting philosophy. One reason that I subscribe to that mindset is because from what I have read children are more outgoing, happy and explorative when they are securely attached to their parents/caregivers. Our child will be turning one this summer and we are still trying to figure it all out as well. I suppose there is not a one-size-fits-all like most things. I will continue to listen to your podcast and I’m interested in the ideas that you present. All in all you’re right mom should stick together and possibly I should stop casting judgment on friends, relatives, acquaintances and strangers who don’t do things “the right way“.

kelsey.dw ,

Long time listener, but....

I’ve listened to this podcast from the beginning when it was the attachment parenting podcast and have (mostly) always enjoyed the content. I love the new podcast and am enjoying this new refreshing perspective, but I do have to say that I have always hated the nervous laughter/giggle/I’m so right that I can’t believe any one else would do things any other way laughter! It has always felt condescending, judgmental, and honestly just inappropriate that I wish it would be a habit you would work on breaking. (Sorry if that comes across as rude, but it’s sincere feedback that I’ve seen others mention as well.)

I appreciate the openness and honesty that it required for you to make the switch to this new podcast. To admit your thinking has shifted and you have new information that has guided you is refreshing, but I’m disappointed to see that you have now clung to these new ideas with the same brazen attitude that you had with AP. That you are doing things the right way now and that any other way is wrong or...laughable. It seems like just a short time ago you had the same attitude about anyone doing anything other than AP.

I am also a first time mom and I followed a similar experience as you with your journey of finding AP and how much it resonated during the first year of life, but then gradually seeing how unsustainable it was long term. I think that lesson of seeing how much my mindset can change has led me to be much more open minded about all parenting practices because who’s to say that in a year my thoughts might not shift again? Especially as a first time parent I think we need to remember that it doesn’t make sense to have such rigid ideas on how children should be raised, since every child, situation, and context is so different!

So please keep the interesting guests coming and the great content, i just wish you would come off your pedestal a little bit and realize that we are all just trying to do our best for our children regardless of what parenting principles we choose for our family and that the shaming in either direction isn’t helpful.

OregonMamaBear3 ,

Judge mental

Many of her guests are interesting and at first I found value in listening to ideas that are not part of mainstream American parenting culture. It was as nice to have a voice separate from the mainstream. However, instead of discussing best parenting practices of attachment parenting she came across as judge mental. Now she has done a 180 and is judge mental towards those who practice attachment parenting. In her most recent podcast she discusses how in tribal communities women had “more important” work than taking care of children and how taking care of children was left for older children. As a mother of 3 I understand that having my older children help with the younger ones is incredibly valuable but as a SAHM the idea that taking care of my children is “unimportant work” or not as valuable as other work that I do is so off putting. She is still judge mental in how she presents information she’s just changed direction on where she directs her judge mental attitude.

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