22 episodes

Welcome to “Raising the HR Bar” a podcast of webinars and conversations with the HR experts of Modern Business Associates. Our goal is to help businesses remain compliant and provide clarity for difficult HR issues that arise in the workplace. MBA is a trusted advisor for HR consultations, payroll processing, risk management and benefits administration.

Raising the HR Bar Podcast Modern Business Associates

    • Education
    • 5.0, 1 Rating

Welcome to “Raising the HR Bar” a podcast of webinars and conversations with the HR experts of Modern Business Associates. Our goal is to help businesses remain compliant and provide clarity for difficult HR issues that arise in the workplace. MBA is a trusted advisor for HR consultations, payroll processing, risk management and benefits administration.

    Webinar and Podcast: Navigating Your Employees Through the COVID-19 Crisis

    Webinar and Podcast: Navigating Your Employees Through the COVID-19 Crisis

    As your trusted HR partner, Modern Business Associates has been issuing COVID-19 pandemic crisis updates to assist you in navigating your business and employees through these unprecedented times. In an effort to provide additional guidance, we have answered your most frequently asked questions and have offered best practice tips during this Webinar.  Click here to listen in as we discuss this ever-changing landscape to help you stay up-to-date and compliant, or listen to the podcast, Raising the HR Bar.







    Topics include:







    Families First Corona Response ActEmergency Paid Sick LeaveEmergency FMLA The CARES Act: Tax Credits and LoansGovernmental Orders and Essential EmployeesCDC and OSHA Recommendations

    • 1 hr 2 min
    Webinar and Podcast: Recruiting Strategies- How to Land “The One”

    Webinar and Podcast: Recruiting Strategies- How to Land “The One”

    Just like dating, recruiting isn't as simple as it used to be. A multitude of websites and social media have changed the game when searching for great talent in a tight labor market. Join us as we discuss best practices and helpful tips for finding "The One". 







    Check out Tamara's article in Tampa Bay Business and Wealth magazine!  You can find it here!







    Topics include:







    Current Recruiting TrendsHow Good Recruiting Can Save You Time and MoneyMaximizing Your Resources to Find the Best TalentThe Impact of Social Media on the Hiring Process





















    Listen to the webinar here or on our podcast Raising the HR Bar.

    • 35 min
    Webinar and Podcast – That’s a Wrap 2019: Answers to Your Year-End Questions

    Webinar and Podcast – That’s a Wrap 2019: Answers to Your Year-End Questions

    End of year can be a hectic time for business owners and their employees. With 2020 quickly approaching it is important to be proactive with year-end tasks.  Listen below to an informative session that will ease the stress associated with year-end payroll practices and prepare you for 2020. Topics include:







    Bonuses2% Shareholders / Health & LifePersonal Use of Company Car (PUCC)Voided, Manual and Unclaimed ChecksAccessing the Employee PortalW-2 Process and other Tax ReportingMinimum Wage Increases























    Listen to the webinar here or on our podcast Raising the HR Bar.

    • 17 min
    Webinar and Podcast – Bugged Out: How to Reduce the Risk of Communicable Diseases in Your Workplace

    Webinar and Podcast – Bugged Out: How to Reduce the Risk of Communicable Diseases in Your Workplace

    A communicable disease is an infectious disease transmissible by direct contact with an affected individual or the individual’s discharges. As an employer, you should have a general understanding of these types of illnesses because they not only affect your employees, but also can have a major effect on your community as a whole. Communicable diseases are also a hot topic right now due to recent outbreaks of Measles and Hepatitis A in the United States and with flu season right around the corner.  















    Measles is a viral disease with fever and red rash among the most common symptoms. Some other symptoms of Measles include dry cough, runny nose, sore throat, inflamed eyes and tiny, white spots with bluish-centers inside the mouth. Measles can be transmitted several different ways - through coughing, sneezing, talking and when infected droplets make their way onto surfaces, which can remain active and contagious for hours. This disease is highly infectious and, according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), between January 1st and September 19th of 2019 there have been 1,241 individual reported cases in the U.S. This is the highest number of cases reported since 1992.







    Hepatitis A is a communicable disease that attacks the liver. Like Measles, Hepatitis A is a vaccine-preventable disease. Symptoms of Hepatitis A include pain in the right side of the abdomen, fever, jaundice, digestion disorders, dark urine, feeling weak, vomiting and nausea. This disease is transmitted from person-to-person contact via the fecal-oral route. This means ingesting something that has been contaminated with the feces of an infected person. There were an estimated 6,700 cases of Hepatitis A in the U.S. in 2017 and incident rates have increased by 140% from 2011 to 2017, according to the CDC.







    Influenza, or the flu, is a viral infection that attacks the respiratory system- nose, throat and lungs. Symptoms of influenza are fever over 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit, aching muscles, chills, sweats, headache, dry cough, fatigue, nasal congestion and sore throat. The flu can be transmitted when the infected person coughs, sneezes, talks, or touches the mouth, eyes or nose. Although the flu may not seem as dangerous as some of the other communicable diseases, it led to 959,000 hospitalizations and over 79,000 deaths from 2017 to 2018.















    As an employer, it is your duty, under the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), to provide a safe and healthful working environment for your employees- this includes protecting employees from communicable diseases like Measles, Hepatitis A and Influenza. Whether you run a restaurant or a medical office, you must follow standard precautions to keep your workplace safe. This means implementing policies and procedures that ensure workers are maintaining a standard level of hygiene in order to eliminate the risk of disease transmission. Standard precautions include hand hygiene (requiring employees to wash hands after using the bathroom and making hand sanitizer available), respiratory hygiene (providing tissue that employees may use to cover the mouth and nose when they cough or sneeze) and ensuring regular cleaning and disinfection of bathrooms and work areas.







    There are some industries whose workers are at a greater risk of contracting communicable disease like healthcare workers, maintenance and waste workers, emergency response personnel and even tattoo artists and body piercers. Workers in these high-risk industries require additional protections in order to do their jobs safely, particularly medical and dental offices. They are required under OSHA to go the extra mile to ensure their employees are working in a safe and healthful environment. One of those requirements is having a Written Exposure Control Plan,

    • 44 min
    Webinar & Podcast: Recognizing a Request for an Accommodation

    Webinar & Podcast: Recognizing a Request for an Accommodation

    The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) prohibits discrimination based on disability and requires covered employers to provide effective, reasonable accommodations for employees with disabilities. Reasonable accommodations are modifications or adjustments to an employee’s work environment, which enable the employee to perform the essential functions of their job.

    Compliance with the ADA starts with knowing when an accommodation request has been made. Employers may not always recognize a request for accommodation since employees are not required to use any magic words or phrases when making a request. According to the EEOC, an individual may use “plain English” and doesn’t need to mention the ADA or use the phrase “reasonable accommodation” when requesting an accommodation.  An employee can file a complaint under the ADA for an employer’s failure to respond to an accommodation request, so it is essential for all supervisors and managers to know how to recognize and respond to accommodation requests.

    In general, if an employee indicates that they are having a problem, related to a medical condition, employers should treat that as an accommodation request. The EEOC provides the following examples in their Enforcement Guidance to help employers understand what type of comments can be considered accommodation requests.

    Example A: An employee tells her supervisor, “I’m having trouble getting to work at my scheduled starting time because of medical treatments I’m undergoing.” This is a request for a reasonable accommodation.

    Example B: An employee tells his supervisor, “I need six weeks off to get treatment for a back problem.” This is a request for a reasonable accommodation.

    Example C: A new employee, who uses a wheelchair, informs the employer that her wheelchair cannot fit under the desk in her office. This is a request for reasonable accommodation.

    Example D: An employee tells his supervisor that he would like a new chair because his present one is uncomfortable. Although this is a request for a change at work, his statement is insufficient to put the employer on notice that he is requesting a reasonable accommodation. He does not link his need for the new chair with a medical condition.

    If you’re unsure whether an employee has requested an accommodation, you should ask the employee to clarify what is being requested and why. When in doubt, err on the side of caution and treat the request as an accommodation request.

    Employers must respond promptly to any accommodation requests and should keep the employee informed as to the status of their request.  Unnecessary delays in processing an accommodation request can violate the ADA. To streamline the accommodations process, employers should establish clear policies and procedures for handling accommodation requests.

    To learn more about the ADA and the necessary steps to take once an accommodation request is received tune into our podcast, Raising the HR Bar on the link below or watch the webinar here. 

     

    • 56 min
    Podcast: Payroll Best Practices & Properly Classifying Employees

    Podcast: Payroll Best Practices & Properly Classifying Employees

    Employers frequently have questions

    regarding the appropriate methods and practices to ensure payroll compliance. One

    of the primary concerns employers face is how to properly classify employees.







    Employee classifications turn on whether an employee is considered exempt or non-exempt. The key characteristics of an exempt employee is someone who is not entitled to overtime pay, who is paid a salary wage, and who earns at least $455.00 per week (certain states might vary on this number). On the other hand, a non-exempt employee is someone who is entitled to overtime pay equal to one and a half times their regular rate of pay, who is paid either a salary or an hourly wage, and is not required to earn a certain amount of wages per week.  







    To determine if your employee

    falls into an exempt classification, there are a few different tests to

    consider. These tests are called “duties tests” because the classification

    decisions are based upon the actual tasks, or duties, that an employee must do

    every day on the job.  The categories of

    exemption encompass criteria that are labeled executive, professional,

    administrative, computer, outside sales and highly compensated.   If an employee meets the duties outlined in

    these categories, then that employee will be exempt from the overtime

    provisions of the law. 







    Classifying your employees correctly is essential to avoiding penalties from the U.S. Department of Labor’s DOL. If an employee is misclassified as an exempt employee, the DOL will require payment of owed wages and can impose a penalty equaling the owed amount of back wages — essentially, doubling the amount paid to the employee.   The DOL has useful information which can aid you in determining the proper classifications of your employees.







    https://www.dol.gov/whd/overtime/fs17a_overview.pdf







    Beyond classification, many

    employers also have trouble with the correct way to compensate an exempt

    employee for a partial work day.  When

    considering how to pay for a partial day worked, you must review your own

    internal policies. First, check to see if the company has an accruals plan. If

    so, you may be able to replace the unworked hours with paid time off (PTO), sick

    leave or vacation pay. If you do not have an accrual policy in place, the

    employee should be compensated for the full work day.  Contrary to popular belief, deductions from

    salary can only be made if an employee misses one or more full days.







    Another common scenario is how to

    handle overtime pay when an employee is not present for the entire work

    week.  For example, if an employee works thirty-three

    (33) hours, but has eight (8) hours of PTO, does an employer need to pay

    overtime for the one (1) hour worked over forty (40)? Federal regulation says no

    because PTO, sick, vacation and holiday pay are not hours worked and do not factor

    into the calculation of overtime. Overtime pay will not trigger until the employee

    has actually worked more than forty (40) hours in a work week.







    As you can see, complying with federal and state regulations can seem a tall task and not all businesses are able to handle this on their own. MBA’s payroll and HR departments offer a multitude of services that help you remain compliant and avoid unnecessary fines and fees.  Listen to the podcast below.  Please contact us for more information at 1-888-622-6460.

    • 24 min

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