44 min

Rand Fishkin on Self-Awareness and Earning Trust The Scott Ross Show

    • Business

Rand Fishkin is not one to keep helpful insights private. If they’re going to improve people’s websites, he is sharing them. It’s a mentality that ruffled a few feathers when he entered the SEO world in 2004 as the founder of Moz, a company he started after leaving his college two credits short of graduating. At the time, it was a secretive world where the masters tried to keep tricks close to their chests. But with his new approach, Rand became a force to be reckoned with. 

He helped grow Moz to make 40 million in revenue. Throughout this journey, he was dealing with a much more personal struggle relating to his mental health, and along the way he learned what brings him energy as a leader. Today, he shares those insights with you.

Transparency is Key

As he started speaking at conferences and with potential clients, industry leaders took notice of how many insights Rand was sharing. And some of them weren’t so happy about it. 

“I got plenty of people who said ‘Rand, you gotta stop writing about this stuff.’”

In spite of these warnings, he trudged forward, realizing the value he was bringing to his audience and the following he was amassing. Plus, deep down, he knew the service was helping people – which was what he cared most about. 

“I thought that the right way was to be transparent. I thought that that would create a more competitive, open, level playing field where it wasn’t the best connected people who would win but the most talented.”

When he started launching products with Moz, these loyal followers showed up in droves, propelling the company to enormous profits. Rand said it shows that having a mentality of transparency and providing value to customers truly does pay off. 

 

Relational Marketing

Seeing your customers as people you want to help and not just potential sources of cash is the best way to build and lead a business, Rand says, not just for the bottom line, but for your own mental health. 

“It’s a wonderful way to live your life. It’ll help you go to sleep at night, it’ll help you wake up and look in the mirror in the morning, but it is also a phenomenal business tactic. Especially in a world where you are counting on repeat visits, references, amplification.”

Industry research suggests it costs 5x more to get a new customer than to retain an existing one, so why not invest even more in those existing relationships? And in time, those customers will draw others to your platform, and your positive reputation will create a greater web presence, propelling that attraction even further.

 

Find Your Own Path

Rand has been forging his own way in the business world since the early 2000’s, and he’s been careful about whose advice to take to heart, especially as he’s noted things about the SEO world he didn’t want to replicate in his companies.  His advice after founding two major companies? Don’t think you have to follow some blueprint to success. Create your own. 

While writing his book Lost and Founder: A Painfully Honest Field Guide to the Startup World, Rand took an intense look at startup culture and identified a few themes. 

1) We’ve glorified the young, male college dropout as the archetypal startup success story. In fact, in the technology world, the average age of founders is in the mid 40’s.  

2) Having a diverse team, including women, people of color and LGBTQ+ folks is strongly correlated with more successful businesses. 

3) You don’t need to raise outside institutional capital to succeed.

Rand Fishkin is not one to keep helpful insights private. If they’re going to improve people’s websites, he is sharing them. It’s a mentality that ruffled a few feathers when he entered the SEO world in 2004 as the founder of Moz, a company he started after leaving his college two credits short of graduating. At the time, it was a secretive world where the masters tried to keep tricks close to their chests. But with his new approach, Rand became a force to be reckoned with. 

He helped grow Moz to make 40 million in revenue. Throughout this journey, he was dealing with a much more personal struggle relating to his mental health, and along the way he learned what brings him energy as a leader. Today, he shares those insights with you.

Transparency is Key

As he started speaking at conferences and with potential clients, industry leaders took notice of how many insights Rand was sharing. And some of them weren’t so happy about it. 

“I got plenty of people who said ‘Rand, you gotta stop writing about this stuff.’”

In spite of these warnings, he trudged forward, realizing the value he was bringing to his audience and the following he was amassing. Plus, deep down, he knew the service was helping people – which was what he cared most about. 

“I thought that the right way was to be transparent. I thought that that would create a more competitive, open, level playing field where it wasn’t the best connected people who would win but the most talented.”

When he started launching products with Moz, these loyal followers showed up in droves, propelling the company to enormous profits. Rand said it shows that having a mentality of transparency and providing value to customers truly does pay off. 

 

Relational Marketing

Seeing your customers as people you want to help and not just potential sources of cash is the best way to build and lead a business, Rand says, not just for the bottom line, but for your own mental health. 

“It’s a wonderful way to live your life. It’ll help you go to sleep at night, it’ll help you wake up and look in the mirror in the morning, but it is also a phenomenal business tactic. Especially in a world where you are counting on repeat visits, references, amplification.”

Industry research suggests it costs 5x more to get a new customer than to retain an existing one, so why not invest even more in those existing relationships? And in time, those customers will draw others to your platform, and your positive reputation will create a greater web presence, propelling that attraction even further.

 

Find Your Own Path

Rand has been forging his own way in the business world since the early 2000’s, and he’s been careful about whose advice to take to heart, especially as he’s noted things about the SEO world he didn’t want to replicate in his companies.  His advice after founding two major companies? Don’t think you have to follow some blueprint to success. Create your own. 

While writing his book Lost and Founder: A Painfully Honest Field Guide to the Startup World, Rand took an intense look at startup culture and identified a few themes. 

1) We’ve glorified the young, male college dropout as the archetypal startup success story. In fact, in the technology world, the average age of founders is in the mid 40’s.  

2) Having a diverse team, including women, people of color and LGBTQ+ folks is strongly correlated with more successful businesses. 

3) You don’t need to raise outside institutional capital to succeed.

44 min

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