18 episodes

Raw and Radical Women in the Arts is a series of conversations with outstanding women in the arts who are striving to live bold, authentic, creatively-fulfilling lives. In these interviews, they explore the themes of identity, vulnerability, authenticity, loneliness, alienation, discrimination, inspiration, empowerment, and social change.

TRUE STORIES AND INSPIRATION FROM CREATIVE WOMEN CHALLENGING SOCIETY'S STATUS QUO

Let's get real about living a life in the arts and the multi-faceted roles of being a creative woman.

For more information, visit us at www.rawradical.com

Raw and Radical Women in the Arts Podcast | Conversations with extraordinary women in the arts Mauren Brodbeck

    • Visual Arts
    • 4.0 • 3 Ratings

Raw and Radical Women in the Arts is a series of conversations with outstanding women in the arts who are striving to live bold, authentic, creatively-fulfilling lives. In these interviews, they explore the themes of identity, vulnerability, authenticity, loneliness, alienation, discrimination, inspiration, empowerment, and social change.

TRUE STORIES AND INSPIRATION FROM CREATIVE WOMEN CHALLENGING SOCIETY'S STATUS QUO

Let's get real about living a life in the arts and the multi-faceted roles of being a creative woman.

For more information, visit us at www.rawradical.com

    Véronique Caye | Raw and Radical Women in the Arts Podcast

    Véronique Caye | Raw and Radical Women in the Arts Podcast

    Theatre director and filmmaker Véronique Caye shares the inspiration and concepts behind her mesmerizing film and performance work

    I am excited to welcome theatre director and filmmaker Véronique Caye to the Raw and Radical Women on the Arts podcast today. She’s here to talk about the inspiration behind her work and the radical concept of being a “pirate” woman.

    Véronique develops hybrid and experimental performances by experimenting with digital technology, and especially focuses on heightening and exploring the tension between the video, the actor, and the audience.



    Thematic inspiration behind her work

    “I explore the video multiplicity… that’s the staging of the image, visual set design, video documentaries, installation, and augmented reality. And also illusion and teaching,” she says. “So it’s a lot, but with these different forms I try to develop a dramaturgy of the image where the sensitive and poetic dominate the medium.”

    Véronique credits a lot of her artistic inspiration to travel and the work of a number of poets.

    “These readings and these trips all around the world put me on the path of what I call my epiphany. So, say a certain kind of philosophy of existential eroticism,” she says. “...to me it’s a philosophy of wondering, desire, of poetry, and a way of annotating every moment of life.”



    “Sleeping Beauty”

    But Véronique also explores the concepts of freedom and what it means to shake free of societal expectations. It was a central theme in her 2008 performance, “Sleeping Beauty,” which

    featured a video showing different movie scenes of women fainting, or falling asleep. During the performance, women were invited to come sleep on the stage while the film montage played behind them. Their sleeping "performances" offered a striking contrast to the passive "fairy tale" sleep shown in the films.

    “When you see the bodies sleeping for real in front of you, it's not… anymore, it’s not the sleeping beauty,” Véronique says. “It’s: I did what I want. I went to sleep during the time I should work… Those scenes are really important.”



    “The Pirate Woman”

    As part of pushing back against expectations, she has developed a concept she calls “the pirate woman,” a role model who is independent and rebellious, but who also feels that living with joy and respect for all human life is important.

    “For me the pirate woman is a new woman. She’s a pagan and a mystic, ruled by one belief, her own,” Véronique says. “I can say it’s me, but it can be also you.”

    The philosophy of the pirate woman is a dedication to “lifting the veil” and exploring what lies underneath our surface thoughts and our perception of reality.

    “Lift the veil and then we see the reality,”  Véronique says, “and then we can start to be connected to others and to be connected to ourselves.”



    For more information on our guest and this episode, visit the website of raw and radical.

    This podcast is supported by the Swiss arts council prohelvetia.


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    • 35 min
    Camille Morineau | Raw and Radical Women in the Arts Podcast

    Camille Morineau | Raw and Radical Women in the Arts Podcast

    AWARE co-founder Camille Morineau talks about representation, the value of women’s artwork, and fixing the historical records

    I am delighted to welcome Camille Morineau to the podcast to talk about her work on researching women artists, her non-profit research organization, and how women artists and others can fix the gender imbalance in the art world and in society.

    Camille first became aware of how few women artists are shown in galleries and in art shows as she was preparing for a show at the Musée National d’Art Moderne. As she was walking through the galleries and reviewing the museum’s collections, she realized that barely 10 percent of the artwork shown was from women.

    In response, she proposed a show focused solely on women artists from the museum’s collections, which became a huge success. The exhibition was called elles@centrepompidou. Although it was initially scheduled to run for two months, it ultimately lasted for two years and drew 2.5 million visitors.

    After the show closed, Morineau wanted to continue researching and promoting women artists, and ultimately co-founded a non-profit, Archives of Women Artists, Research and Exhibitions (AWARE) to continue her work.

    For more information on our guest and this episode, visit the website at www.rawradical.com

    This podcast is supported by the Swiss arts council prohelvetia.


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    • 26 min
    Ali Kazma | Raw and Radical Women in the Arts Podcast

    Ali Kazma | Raw and Radical Women in the Arts Podcast

    Ali Kazma, Turkish video artist, talks about the significance of human labor and our inherent potential for transformation in his new exhibition, “Women at Work.”

    Today I’m pleased to introduce Ali Kazma, a Turkish video artist who explores the meaning and significance behind human activity and labor. He just had a beautiful new solo exhibition, “Women at Work,” at the Galerie Analix Forever in Geneva.

    Kazma has been creating short videos that explore the process and skill behind various professions since 1998, as part of an effort to survey and document the neighborhood he lives in. As part of an early exhibition, titled “Today,” he explored the process of shooting video on location in the morning, such as at a clock maker’s studio or in a butcher’s shop, and releasing the edited video in the evening, projecting the video through the gallery window for people on the street to watch.

    “As I was doing it and through my survey of my district I understood that a lot of the activities we as humans do are to keep the order around us from dissolving,” he says. “The world left on its own is all about going from order to disorder. A lot of the things we do are about upkeeping, maintenance, or adding some kind of order—new forms into the world we inhabit.”

    For more information on our guest and this episode, visit the website of raw and radical.

    This podcast is supported by the Swiss arts council prohelvetia.


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    • 43 min
    Dr. Sarah Thornton | Raw and Radical Women in the Arts Podcast

    Dr. Sarah Thornton | Raw and Radical Women in the Arts Podcast

    Dr. Sarah Thornton, a writer and sociologist of art, talks about what makes an artist an artist, their role in society, and their need to be active agents of their own career.

    I’m very pleased to be interviewing Dr. Sarah Thornton on the show today. Sarah has written extensively about the art world and art market for many publications, including The Economist. She has also written three critically acclaimed books, each of which dives deeply into issues of authenticity, believability and cultural value.

    In her book 33 Artists in 3 Acts, one of the research questions was: what is an artist? “The great thing about being an artist is that it is self-defined,” she explained to me, “but it’s self-defined within reason. So, not anybody can just say ‘I’m an artist’ and have credibility and the social role and status of an artist.”

    The issue of artistic credibility, she says, hinges on the fact that being an artist is not just a job, but an identity. So artists have to prove their worth in the eyes of the public, collectors, and museum curators.

    For more information about this podcast and story, click HERE


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    • 53 min
    Dr. Asma Naeem | Raw and Radical Women in the Arts Podcast

    Dr. Asma Naeem | Raw and Radical Women in the Arts Podcast

    Asma Naeem, Chief Curator for the Baltimore Museum of Art, discusses women and gender fluidity representation in the BMA 2020 Vision initiative.



    Today I am very excited to welcome Dr. Asma Naeem to the On Display podcast. Naeem is an art historian and is currently the Chief Curator at the Baltimore Museum of Art. She brings a unique lens and motivation to her work, curating art pieces and installations that directly address issues of social justice, under-representation, and inequity.

    The Baltimore Museum of Art recently made headlines for their 2020 Vision initiative, timed to coincide with the 100th anniversary of the Nineteenth Amendment, which gave women the right to vote in the United States.



    Commemorating women and gender fluidity in the arts

    Naeem says that while discussing how to commemorate the occasion, the question really became how to recognize the event while also being provocative about social justice issues and representation.

    “We decided that the best way to discuss the trajectory that women have made in the past 100 years was to devote an entire year of exhibitions to women artists or artists who identify as women, as well as to focus our acquisitions on works that were made by women,” Naeem says.

    The decision to include women artists and artists who identify as women has generated a great deal of discussion.

    While some responses to the decision and the initiative itself were predictably adverse—questioning the need to have a focus on women or to be inclusive of transgender women artists—overall the comments have been robustly positive and have even questioned whether the museum has gone far enough to make a real, lasting difference.

    Read the story HERE!

    For more information please visit our website www.rawradical.com and follow us on social media: instagram, facebook, twitter


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    • 31 min
    Maïa Mazaurette | Raw and Radical Women in the Arts Podcast

    Maïa Mazaurette | Raw and Radical Women in the Arts Podcast

    Artist and sexpert Maïa Mazaurette shares her perspective on appreciating the male body and challenging popular culture’s “sex machinery”



    Today I am excited to welcome Maïa Mazaurette, who is a sexpert, writer, columnist, keynote speaker, painter, and illustrator, and is challenging gender roles and sex norms through her writing and artwork.

    Maïa has been researching the role of sex in artwork for over 15 years, and regularly shares her sex expertise and knowledge through the columns she writes for GQ France magazine and several newspapers. As an artist and painter, she focuses on the male body, in part to challenge what she terms the “sex machinery” of the world’s dominant sexual culture.



    Celebrating and appreciating male bodies

    Maïa began drawing and painting men after repeatedly asking other women to do the same, but receiving no response.

    “Two years ago I decided that I could not keep asking people to do something that I wouldn’t want to make happen myself,” she says. “And I started to look for models and I started to work… and I started to realize that some things were more complicated than I imagined.”

    Among those challenges, she says, has been figuring out how to pose her models in a way that is masculine, but not imposing or aggressive.

    “What is masculine? What is beautiful for a man?” she asks. “We are used to seeing them as sexy human beings only when they’re doing something because you have the idea that women are passive and men are active.”

    “If you want to have one man alone in a picture, and … he’s not applying his power on a human being or an object, then you suddenly have a man who is displaying some kind of female quality and then it’s not sexy anymore and it doesn’t work,” she says.

    Finding her way around this problem has led Maïa to experiment with different poses, developing an entirely new “language of position” that translates her models’ sexiness and beauty to the canvas.



    Continuing the sexual revolution

    Maïa sees her work as a way to continue and even radically change the direction of the sexual revolution that began in the 1960s. That change should include making it possible to appreciate regular male bodies in our everyday lives, and with more frequency.

    “As women, we don’t have a lot of occasions to look at men for three hours at a time. Usually we mostly see men who are dressed up and also in museums and also on tv,” she says, adding that 75 percent of the museum artwork we see is female-centric.

    Focusing on men in her work changes that dynamic, giving women an opportunity to stare at beautifully rendered male bodies for as long as they wish.

    She also wants to help people create a new language around sex, one that finds a middle ground between the somewhat vulgar language and the prim, reproductive-focused language from earlier eras.

    Her hope is that her work—both written and artistic—will encourage people consider the myriad of sexual possibilities that are open to them, and have happier sex lives as a result.

    “We see that every single piece of the sex machinery is being challenged at the moment,” she says. “It is great sometimes to be puzzled, to be lost, because then we can write a different sex map… My wish is not to say what exactly is the sex utopia. I just want to explain what is mine so that people can disagree and make their own.”

    Read the story HERE!

    For more information on our guest or this episode, please visit our website www.rawradical.com and follow us on social media @rawradical


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    • 1 hr 1 min

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5
3 Ratings

3 Ratings

Cristina Tucker ,

Art

This is a great podcast about women in art. Very different perspectives and approaches to the creative process with the feminine world in common. Very Interesting and necessary in todays world

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