200 episodes

The REACH OR MISS podcast is about the customer focused entrepreneur. Hayut Yogev chats with Guy Kawasaki, John Lee Dumas, Michael Stelzner, Kate Erickson, Chris Brogan, Mark Schaefer, Joe Pulizzi, Marcus Sheridan and more successful entrepreneurs and opinion leaders about their Customers Approach and Focus.

The goal is to help entrepreneurs and startup founders to reach business success with the right strategy, marketing and sales approach.

REACH OR MISS - Entrepreneurial Marketing Success Hayut Yogev

    • Entrepreneurship
    • 5.0 • 196 Ratings

The REACH OR MISS podcast is about the customer focused entrepreneur. Hayut Yogev chats with Guy Kawasaki, John Lee Dumas, Michael Stelzner, Kate Erickson, Chris Brogan, Mark Schaefer, Joe Pulizzi, Marcus Sheridan and more successful entrepreneurs and opinion leaders about their Customers Approach and Focus.

The goal is to help entrepreneurs and startup founders to reach business success with the right strategy, marketing and sales approach.

    Ep. 210 – James Layfield lost Microsoft as a client for being too arrogant and then won the contract for partnering to establish Google Campus in London…

    Ep. 210 – James Layfield lost Microsoft as a client for being too arrogant and then won the contract for partnering to establish Google Campus in London…

    James Layfield is an entrepreneur and investor creating positive change through innovation in sectors ranging from property to financial technology.
    Most recently, James co-founded Clearfind, an easy-to-use, unbiased artificial intelligence platform that is changing the way companies manage and optimize software with data.
    James is a general partner in a fintech investment fund Treasury with the cofounders of Acorns, Betterment, and a board member of Paypal, and has angel investments across a host of technology ventures.
    James has founded and led multiple successful companies including Rise, the world’s largest fintech innovation platform, with Barclays; Never Ever Limited, an innovation catalyst and consulting agency; and Central Working, a shared workspace hub for business professionals.
    James is currently an ambassador for CognitionX the AI event, London and Partners, and the ScaleUp Institute. He also serves as the New York Tech Ambassador for the Mayor of London.

    Most passionate about
    The thing that I'm working on right now is something that I've been exploring for the last four years, in a really interesting area of the world: software.
    I'm working on a company called Clearfind. We’re here to help people bring software into their company as effectively as possible and manage and reduce the cost of the software.
    James’s career and story
    I think of myself as a serial entrepreneur. I've always been driven by an absolute passion to try and solve problems that I have faced in my life.
    I basically created the idea of co-working in the UK, even before the work came around, which is quite exciting, through financial technology. I've been working in financial technology for the last 10 years with some of the biggest banks in the world.
    The number of available options in the market has increased exponentially and yet the tools with which to navigate it are the same. That's why there is this beautiful, cool area for tool like clarified.
    We're bringing that together with AI so that we can augment people in their jobs to make consistently smarter decisions. We think we've excelled at that.
    The first three years of our journey were spent working out how to do the software and then gathering that data. We only launched it in October of last year.
    We’re a four-year-old company that has been selling since October of last year. The reason is that it's really hard to do the thing that we've managed to do. Once we went to market, we found that this resonates with that audience of companies spending between three and 10 million a year and also with consultants.
    We have a couple of the world's largest consultancy firms working with us and are already getting some great results. On top of that, we have companies from many different sectors, from finance and banking to biotech and high-tech. Among all of these organizations, the commonality is the amount of money they're spending annually on software and the complexity of the ecosystem.
    Best advice for entrepreneurs
    I think basically to listen. I have to constantly remind myself of that.
    What we're doing is going back through the real insights that we have in our business from our real customers and opening our ears to listen to what they're telling us. You then start to adapt and change your messaging and product in a way that's going to resonate with them.
    The biggest, most critical failure with customers
    Many years ago, one of my first ever ventures was an experiential creative agency. We had just gotten to the final stages of hopefully about to win Microsoft.
    We were meeting the people whom you never want to meet when you're trying to sell someone, which is the procurement team.
    We want us both to come away really happy with this deal. That's where my little ego became a nightmare. I said, “I think the pricing is really fair right now, but are you sure you want me to look at wh

    • 33 min
    Ep. 209 – Derick Van Ness goal is to help people create financial certainty so that they can stop worrying so much about money

    Ep. 209 – Derick Van Ness goal is to help people create financial certainty so that they can stop worrying so much about money

    Derick Van Ness is a Wealth Strategist who is passionate about helping people reach their full potential. His company, Big Life Financial is focused on removing the mystery and misinformation surrounding money and financial strategy so people can live their BIGGEST LIFE!
    Derick believes that each person has something unique and valuable to contribute to the world, but that most people are never able to express that gift due to fear, doubt, or worry related to money. His mission is to eradicate that fear and fundamentally change the way that people think about and utilize money within the next generation.

    Most passionate about
    I am most passionate today about getting back out and re-engaging with the world after the pandemic.
    I've really been feeling the excitement of getting close to being able to go out and meet with friends, to go dancing and sailing and do a lot of the things that I like to do in my personal life.
    On the business level, I'm really passionate about a lot of the changes that are happening in the way people are engaging with the world. I love how technology is being used in many ways to bring people together.
    Derick’s career and story
    I wanted to own my own business. I wasn't sure what it was going to be, but my father was a business owner and I saw the flexibility that it offered him.
    So, I knew that I needed to learn how to sell. I took a sales job right out of college.
    At first, it was just knocking doors, door to door. I was scared to death of that. Then, after doing that for six months, I took a phone sales job where we would cold-call people and build relationships from nothing. That was as hard as could be.
    My first three years out of school, I probably did 50,000 cold calls.
    At that point, I felt like I had the skill set to start my business because I'd worked with so many business owners and seen financial statements, and I knew how to sell. Then I had to decide what I wanted to do. I chose to become a real estate investor and start flipping houses.
    I really learned a lot just by being fortunate enough to have made a lot of money when I was young.
    Today, we do financial strategy and tax strategy for business owners.
    Our goal is to help people create financial certainty so that they can stop worrying so much about money and focus on doing the work or being the person that they're here to be. The company's called Big Life Financial, and the idea is that we get money out of the way so that you can live the big life you're here to live.
    Best advice for entrepreneurs
    I think the most important thing that gets overlooked in sales is asking good questions and listening to salespeople practice their sales pitch. They practice overcoming objections, they practice how to present, they practice all these things, but it's not what communication is not about, what you’re saying, it's about what the customer is hearing.
    If you don't know their needs, you can't speak in terms of their needs when you present.
    The biggest, most critical failure with customers
    I would say my biggest failure with clients is that sometimes, when my business has grown in big spurts, my follow-through of continuing to stay in touch with clients and continuing to stay engaged and active with them, has not been as good as it could have been.
    Relationships have come naturally to me, so I've relied on that. At times in my business growth, by not having cadences, and not having routines, and not having systems to support me, I've dropped the ball.
    Biggest success with customers
    I think the best thing that I've ever done, and I kind of learned this in the real estate business, was when my greed glands turn on.
    My greatest success has been learning how to view every single person—whether a big or small client—as a human being, to treat them as a human being and work with them.
    As a human being, I'm so much more effective, just letting

    • 32 min
    Ep. 208 – Bryan Clayton: From mowing grass to co-founding what Entrepreneur magazine called the “Uber for lawn care”, doing $20 million a year

    Ep. 208 – Bryan Clayton: From mowing grass to co-founding what Entrepreneur magazine called the “Uber for lawn care”, doing $20 million a year

    Bryan Clayton is CEO and cofounder of GreenPal an online marketplace that connects homeowners with Local lawn care professionals. GreenPal has been called the “Uber for lawn care” by Entrepreneur magazine and has over 200,000 active users completing thousands of transactions per day.
    Before starting GreenPal Bryan Clayton founded Peachtree Inc. one of the largest landscaping companies in the state of Tennessee growing it to over $10 million a year in annual revenue before it was acquired by Lusa holdings in 2013.
    Bryan’s interest and expertise are related to entrepreneurialism, small business growth, marketing and bootstrapping businesses from zero revenue to profitability and exit.

    Most passionate about
    I am the co-founder and CEO of a company called GreenPal, which, in one sentence, is kind of like the Uber of lawn mowing.
    We have over 300,000 people using the app and we’re doing $20 million a year in revenue. So, we're kind of an eight-year overnight success.
    Our business has doubled year over year for the past six years. That's the cadence we want to continue until the numbers just get too big.
    Bryan’s career and story
    I started mowing grass as a way to make extra cash, to put myself through college. When I graduated college, I had to make a decision. Was I going to stick with this little lawn mowing business, or go into the job market? Luckily, I decided to stay with the lawn mowing business. I didn't really want to be a grass-cutting guy my whole life, but I was making good money. I was earning a good living and I kind of liked it.
    In 2013, that business was acquired by one of the largest landscaping companies in the United States. By growing that business, with just me and a push mower to 150 people, I learned a lot through trial and error about how to grow a business, how to get a business to profitability, and how to get a business sold.
    I realized that about myself and I thought, ‘Okay, well, it's time to start the next thing.’
    The idea for GreenPal was a straightforward one for me. I addressed the things I saw over the previous 15 years of growing a landscaping business. I thought, ‘Okay, an app needs to exist to make this easier, kind of like Airbnb and Uber and Lyft.’
    I recruited two co-founders and we went to work. We really didn't know the first thing about any of that stuff. We just didn't give up. We stuck with it. We focused on little goals and got those done, then kept making the app better and better.
    One thing that got us through those early hard years was that we would make it extremely easy for anybody to talk to us. We would always talk to our users and our customers to get their feedback, to understand what it was we needed to work on. We stuck at it and kept applying that feedback and improving the app. Here we are, eight years later, and we have a profitable business that's growing.
    Best advice for entrepreneurs
    If you're just getting started, my best advice is to get as many loyal customers as you can, whether it be six, a dozen, twenty, a hundred.
    Don't focus on big goals and big revenue goals. Just focus on little goals, making those people's lives better.
    The biggest, most critical failure with customers
    We thought that the value proposition was going to be to deliver the cheapest way to get your grass cut. We thought, ‘If we can just be $5 or $10 cheaper than the other way, people will use the app.’ That was a mistake.
    Also, in talking to people on both sides of the transaction for a long time, we kind of ignored the supplier side, the vendor side. That came at a cost because we didn't really understand that if these guys and gals weren't really happy with the product, they weren't going to use it.
    Biggest success with customers
    So, once we started to understand our value proposition and really understand, “This is how we compete in the marketplace and this is how we d

    • 29 min
    Ep. 207 – Joe Paranteau is a leading expert on sales, gener-ating more than $1B in just five years: “I don’t see a sale that could be unwinnable.”

    Ep. 207 – Joe Paranteau is a leading expert on sales, gener-ating more than $1B in just five years: “I don’t see a sale that could be unwinnable.”

    Joe Paranteau is a leading expert on sales, generating more than $1B in just five years, an uncommon accomplishment. He has led nearly 30K sales meetings in his 28-year career with Fortune 500, SMBs, and startup businesses. In his first book, Billion Dollar Sales Secrets, he shares fifteen secrets to help inspire salespeople to rise to meet today’s challenges, ignite their dreams and success.

    Most passionate about
    My book is coming out. That has been three years in the making.
    I've also completed my MBA. I went back to school during this time, something that I wanted to do, and I'm so happy that I did.
    I'm most passionate about helping everyone increase their sales IQ and really execute so that they can provide the things they need for their families and their companies.
    Our company motto is to help people and businesses throughout the world achieve their full potential. It says nothing about technology but that's what I love to do: help people.
    Joe’s career and story
    I'm the first generation in my family to grow up off the Indian reservation. So, I'm a member of a tribe.
    I was the first one to grow up in suburbia. I have these two worlds that I grew up in. I grew up poor and didn't have a lot.
    To help the family, my brother, sister, and I would paint rocks and go door to door to sell them. So, I guess my career really started when I was eight years old.
    I served in the military as a way to do something to better my life.
    I went to college, graduated, and then I had an opportunity to get into sales. I thought I wanted to go into politics. That was my thinking at the time. Then I met someone who said, “Joe, you have a technical background and a background in communication. Very interesting. Why don't you want to go into sales?”
    She explained to me what I just shared with you earlier: That selling is all about helping people get what they want or need. If you can look yourself in the mirror every day and say to yourself, “Today, I helped somebody,” then you're doing all right.
    The company that I worked for was a technology company that was a Microsoft partner, 28 years ago. So, I started there and worked through a series of startups. Some of them were super successful, some of them were not. Many of them got merged and acquired by other companies, but my path at Microsoft has been interesting.
    I've been here 16 years, and this is the sixth role and fourth startup that I've been in inside the company. I've helped start different businesses inside the company. The basis for my book was a startup in our health industry team that I was able to help grow to a billion dollars in five years.
    Best advice for entrepreneurs
    A pretty good one is to focus. Be comfortable and openly search for ways to fail. Don't be afraid of failure. I've come to a place in my sales and business career where I don't see obstacles. I don't see a sale that could be unwinnable.
    Be open to shifting and being honest with yourself. The only thing that's going against us is time. If we can change the way we approach things, that's really what has to change. If we learn something new, we can approach the situation differently. Then we're one step closer.
    The biggest, most critical failure with customers
    The biggest failure that I've had in sales is not listening well and not aligning myself with what the customer wanted. When I've looked at it from a selfish ambition standpoint, that's a surefire way to fail.
    I had a customer with a very specific set of criteria. At first, it sounded like I knew exactly what they needed, so I rushed that. I went directly into, “Okay, this will be easy to sell.” I missed the mark completely. The customer felt awkward. They told me, “We like you as a person, Joe, but we're going to go with this other company because they met our needs more completely.” It was a tough loss.
    Biggest success with customers
    One of

    • 34 min
    Ep. 206 – David Jay best advice – When I was 16 my dad told me: “David, if you do your business about helping people, you always have plenty of work.”

    Ep. 206 – David Jay best advice – When I was 16 my dad told me: “David, if you do your business about helping people, you always have plenty of work.”

    David is the founder and CEO of Warm Welcome and was recently named a Top 100 Tech Innovator and Influencer.
    In today’s market most businesses struggle to stand out in crowded markets. Warm Welcome helps businesses upgrade from boring text to personal video so they can build meaningful relationships that drive real revenue.
    David has bootstrapped several startups into multi-million ARR. Revenues from Warm Welcome, along with his other four companies, exceed $6 million in 2020.
    Over the previous years the pursuit of efficiency and automation has created a lonely world that is actually disconnected from what we need the most – people!

    Most passionate about
    First is my family; we just moved to Florida, and I have two young boys, two and four. So that's an exciting, exciting time of life.
    My business babies and the startup guide; I have a few tech startups, and we're working on selling one of those and working on building one of those. The newest one is called Warm Welcome.
    it's a way to personalize your business and build trust quickly through video.
    it's a way to stand out in your market.
    It is a way to make things more personal, more human by moving beyond kind of boring old texts, emails, or text on your website and putting a face behind it, putting a smile behind it.
    David’s career and story
    I remember back in sixth grade, I went down to the store and started buying up candy bars on sale, Reese's peanut butter cups and everyone loves them. And I started selling those, and the school shut me down...
    I saw problems back then and enjoyed solving them and enjoyed coming up with a better way of doing something or at least something that I thought was better.
    So, then I went on to college and actually ended up dropping out of college and starting a service business of photography and love doing that for about 10 years; it hits all the typical scale problems that everyone has in the service business, whether you're a photographer or contractor.
    So, I started to build communities around the software. One of my mentors, Tim Sanders, said, your network is your net worth. And I thought about that, and I thought I need to build a network: I need to build a community of people that knows me and trust me. Through the community, I started to hear other people's problems and try and come up with solutions for those. And so that's been what pulled me into tech.
    Best advice for entrepreneurs
    When I was 16 years old, my dad sat me down and said, David, if you do your business about helping other people, you always have plenty of work.
    I think that's probably the best advice out there and something that we often miss when we're building a business or building a product; we tend to think a lot about our business and our product. Still, really we need to be thinking about the customer and thinking about the problem that the customer has and how we are going to help them solve their problem.
    The biggest, most critical failure with customers
    One thing that I've had a tendency to do is to take too much time building what I want to build, a product that I think is the right thing for the market instead of building an MVP or building a beta prototype that I can then take to the market and get their feedback on it earlier.
    With green.com, I spent about a million dollars more than I needed to spend building that. It cost me a couple of million bucks to get that product going. Because we spent our whole first year building, building, building, building, building, and so what we were essentially doing was baking the product. And then by the time, we presented it to the customer and they gave us feedback on it, we couldn't re-bake it. And so, it almost cost me the entire business because, uh, we were running out of money.
    Biggest success with customers
    I'd probably say that the biggest success I've had has been in the photo industry, creating a new

    • 29 min
    Ep. 205 - Isaac Kuhlman teaches everything about having an Amazon business and say - “People are so afraid of rejection or failure, that they don't even get started.”

    Ep. 205 - Isaac Kuhlman teaches everything about having an Amazon business and say - “People are so afraid of rejection or failure, that they don't even get started.”

    Isaac Kuhlman has been an Amazon Brand Developer since 2013, responsible for more than $12 Million in revenue. He is the co- founder of REAL Coaching with Kirsty Verity where they have helped over 1,000 Amazon Sellers grow their businesses with the right strategies to achieve their freedom goals. They specialize in taking sellers who are stuck or plateaued in their business and break through to reach the real success they desire.
    Now he gets to enjoy real freedom and pursue his lifelong passion for Rock music-- having produced and recorded an album, bicycling 11 miles a day, writing a poetry book and traveling the world.

    Most passionate about
    I'm an Amazon seller and have two brands on Amazon. Then we provide coaching through Real Coaching, which is a company I started with my business partner, Kirsty.
    We help entrepreneurs establish sustainable long-term businesses on Amazon—not just selling products, but actually getting businesses set up and built, finding products that can be sustainable and that are not just fad-products.
    I've always wanted to be somebody who educates but also leads other people to build an opportunity for themselves.
    Isaac’s career and story
    I grew up pretty poor. I graduated from high school and took a couple of scholarships and a grant to go to school. I still had to pay a bunch of student loans. Actually, last year I finally paid off my student loans from 2004, when I graduated from college.
    I got a history degree with a pre-law or political science minor. My school didn’t have a pre-law major, but they had a pathway. I was happy that it didn't work out in the end because it kind of built a fire inside of me.
    I met a guy who was working in an Amazon business. I didn't know that much about Amazon. I had shopped on it a couple of times. I knew some stuff about online and Facebook, but it wasn't like I was savvy about e-commerce selling.
    We worked together for about two-and-a-half years, selling a lot of stuff. Then we branched off and went our separate ways. It changed the situation.
    I didn't have any plan. I had limited funds in the bank. Then I went out and started my own brands and the coaching business and all that stuff.
    Best advice for entrepreneurs
    I think Robert Kiyosaki has a quote similar to this: People who fail quit easily. Winners always try to fail as fast as possible.
    People are so afraid of rejection or failure, of something not working out one time, that they don't even get started.
    In my opinion, you only fail if you give up. You want to keep finding these things that you can do better.
    The only way you can do things better is to make mistakes along the way. Mistakes are the best learning tools in the world. Put your hand on a hot stove. You’ll remember never to do that again.
    The biggest, most critical failure with customers
    This was very early on in my Amazon business. There was a person who said they got a defective product and they were going to sue us.
    My response wasn't overly negative, but it was kind of skeptical—pushing off the blame, but at the same time it wasn't helpful because it kind of made it seem like it was all their fault.
    We eventually got him to calm down. He wanted to write every Amazon customer and tell them, like, all this stuff about how it was a bad product.
    He was writing a bad review. It became a huge issue when it could have been resolved just by checking the tone of the email.
    Biggest success with customers
    This was back around 2014, and a customer had received a product. They bought it from the Amazon listing that we created, but that didn’t necessarily mean that they were going to get the product from us because other sellers could jump on there and sell a fake version. That's actually what ended up happening, but we didn't know that at first.
    The customer came out and said, “I used to use your product and it blew up. Essentially burnt o

    • 40 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
196 Ratings

196 Ratings

Gisele_Oliveira ,

A+ Podcast

I love this show. The host is really entertaining and the content is pure gold. This show became my top show. Keep up the great work!

HarloB ,

Very Informitive

Those of us in business know that marketing in the right way is great for business and this podcast is a great show for customer focus and opportunities. She has much to teach!

Jim @ Trade Show U ,

Wonderful!

I really struggle with Focus, and Hayut's interview on the topic of Focus was just what I needed! Really wonderful podcast.

Top Podcasts In Entrepreneurship

Listeners Also Subscribed To