6 min

Reach Your Brand’s Audience. Use Story‪.‬ Resoundcast - the branding podcast from Resound, a creative agency

    • Marketing

How do you truly connect with your brand's audience? Through story. Great stories stick with us...and the reason why is no great mystery.



They resonate.



From Star Wars and The Godfather to the plays of William Shakespeare, a great story survives time and change because for audience after audience, something true and potent sunk in.

Star Wars and Brand Story

That is, if we break apart the plot of the first Star Wars film, we see a template of events that are millennia old — a young hero who yearns for adventure is pried from home after a trusting guide, and a chaotic chain of events thrusts him into the innards of the Death Star itself. The events are both deeply familiar and yet invigorating...because, on some level, we see our own life parallel the hero’s quest.



So we watch.

Story Involves and Motivates Your Brand's Audience

In other words, stories like Star Wars don’t exist in a vacuum. They land, and land well, with their brand's audience...and with subsequent generations of audiences who love the story so much they consume fan fiction, dress up for conventions, and in some countries, lobby to make Star Wars an official religion.



If you’re just joining us, don’t worry. This article isn’t part of a Star Wars series and we won’t be talking about the new Obi-Wan show.



Rather, it’s a series on authentic B2B branding...and my point is that potent brands reach people with the posture and messaging of a timeless classic story. If you’re just joining by the way, you can read more about how the elements of a brand that guides its customer (the hero), mesh with the elements of story by reading this article on how to tell a remarkable brand story.



https://youtu.be/jgXdwIebNHA

The Final Piece of Your Branding Effort

Riffin’ on story brings me right to the heart of it.



On the top of the branding pyramid, way above the foundation of a true, authentic purpose —  and above the narrowing, rising layers of personality, metaphor, archetype, history, location, and brand story — we find a sharpened, or…if we’re still talking pyramids, a crudely sharpened capstone. As magnificent as it may look, the whole structure is pointing at something:



Your brand’s audience.



Every author knows that when you’re telling a story, you need to pay attention to your brand's audience. The same applies for a large corporation, a regional B2B branding agency like Resound, and your own company.



Who’s your brand's audience? Which hero are you aiming to guide to the finish line?



While most companies have a good, or even a statistically sharpened understanding of who they’re trying to reach, the question is worth asking again, and as simply as possible, from a brand and brand story perspective.

Your Brand's Audience Squared

You might respond that I’m forgetting one thing — your brand or company has more than one audience.



Take it easy.



If you’ve got more than one audience, (or more than one product), you’re in good company. In fact, even if you create one product or offer one service,

How do you truly connect with your brand's audience? Through story. Great stories stick with us...and the reason why is no great mystery.



They resonate.



From Star Wars and The Godfather to the plays of William Shakespeare, a great story survives time and change because for audience after audience, something true and potent sunk in.

Star Wars and Brand Story

That is, if we break apart the plot of the first Star Wars film, we see a template of events that are millennia old — a young hero who yearns for adventure is pried from home after a trusting guide, and a chaotic chain of events thrusts him into the innards of the Death Star itself. The events are both deeply familiar and yet invigorating...because, on some level, we see our own life parallel the hero’s quest.



So we watch.

Story Involves and Motivates Your Brand's Audience

In other words, stories like Star Wars don’t exist in a vacuum. They land, and land well, with their brand's audience...and with subsequent generations of audiences who love the story so much they consume fan fiction, dress up for conventions, and in some countries, lobby to make Star Wars an official religion.



If you’re just joining us, don’t worry. This article isn’t part of a Star Wars series and we won’t be talking about the new Obi-Wan show.



Rather, it’s a series on authentic B2B branding...and my point is that potent brands reach people with the posture and messaging of a timeless classic story. If you’re just joining by the way, you can read more about how the elements of a brand that guides its customer (the hero), mesh with the elements of story by reading this article on how to tell a remarkable brand story.



https://youtu.be/jgXdwIebNHA

The Final Piece of Your Branding Effort

Riffin’ on story brings me right to the heart of it.



On the top of the branding pyramid, way above the foundation of a true, authentic purpose —  and above the narrowing, rising layers of personality, metaphor, archetype, history, location, and brand story — we find a sharpened, or…if we’re still talking pyramids, a crudely sharpened capstone. As magnificent as it may look, the whole structure is pointing at something:



Your brand’s audience.



Every author knows that when you’re telling a story, you need to pay attention to your brand's audience. The same applies for a large corporation, a regional B2B branding agency like Resound, and your own company.



Who’s your brand's audience? Which hero are you aiming to guide to the finish line?



While most companies have a good, or even a statistically sharpened understanding of who they’re trying to reach, the question is worth asking again, and as simply as possible, from a brand and brand story perspective.

Your Brand's Audience Squared

You might respond that I’m forgetting one thing — your brand or company has more than one audience.



Take it easy.



If you’ve got more than one audience, (or more than one product), you’re in good company. In fact, even if you create one product or offer one service,

6 min