41 episodes

At Real Food Media, we believe each one of us has a story to tell, and that sharing our stories strengthens our communities and our movements. Our two podcast series bring you stories from the food movement through a powerful combination of “book smarts” and “street smarts” (or is it soil savvy?). Real Food Reads, our long-standing book club and podcast, interviews the authors of today’s most important books at the intersection of food, politics, and culture. And our newest podcast series, Foodtopias, showcases the stories of workers, farmers, healers, ecologists, BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and people of color), womxn, and community organizers who are growing food & cultivating utopia. Together, Real Food Media podcasts offer you the inspiration you need to build your own food activist toolkit. For more resources, visit: www.realfoodmedia.org.

Real Food Media Real Food Media

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.9 • 29 Ratings

At Real Food Media, we believe each one of us has a story to tell, and that sharing our stories strengthens our communities and our movements. Our two podcast series bring you stories from the food movement through a powerful combination of “book smarts” and “street smarts” (or is it soil savvy?). Real Food Reads, our long-standing book club and podcast, interviews the authors of today’s most important books at the intersection of food, politics, and culture. And our newest podcast series, Foodtopias, showcases the stories of workers, farmers, healers, ecologists, BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and people of color), womxn, and community organizers who are growing food & cultivating utopia. Together, Real Food Media podcasts offer you the inspiration you need to build your own food activist toolkit. For more resources, visit: www.realfoodmedia.org.

    No Meat Required: Alicia Kennedy | Ep. 60

    No Meat Required: Alicia Kennedy | Ep. 60

    Alicia Kennedy's No Meat Required: The Cultural History and Culinary Future of Plant-Based Eating, delves into the subcultures and politics that have defined vegan and vegetarian cuisine in the United States—from tempeh production to vegan punk cafes. In this episode, Alicia talks to Anna Lappé about the feminist origins of her own veganism, how she eats in Puerto Rico, and how the cultural signifiers of meat and plant-based eating have shifted over time.

    SHOW NOTES:
    3:18 | Alicia’s love of okra
    ​​4:28 | What Alicia hopes people will take away from her book about veganism and vegetarian politics
    6:00 | Meat eating in the US culture wars
    7:06 | The abundance of meat tied to United States as US as an “exceptional nation”; political tolerance for injustices like child labor in the meat industry; meat eating linked to ideas like masculine virility
    8:40 | Link between vegetarianism and the feminist movement
    10:10 | Lagusta’s Luscious’ vegan “Furious Vulva” chocolate
    11:55 | Alicia on corporate fake meat alternatives, and coming back to the original veggie burger
    14:59 | The PR dollars behind pushing fake meat as a “solution”
    15:57 | The dangerous focus on, and obsession with, protein
    18:07 | The misconception of that veganism is mostly white and middle class; the radical, BIPOC lineages of veganism and the contributions of Bryant Terry and others.
    22:32 | Re-politicizing veganism and vegetarianism
    23:17 | Making the food and climate connection; what difference do individual food choices make?
    24:42 | Parallels between consuming food and clothes; “fast fashion”
    27:00 | Individual choices as “tiny bricks thrown against the window of tyranny”
    27:24 | How much the meat industry pours into public relations
    29:50 | Anna and Alicia talk about Aubrey Plaza’s “wood milking” bit for the Dairy Council

    DIG DEEPER:
    Preorder the book (out 8/15/23), http://www.beacon.org/No-Meat-Required-P1938.aspx
    From the Desk of Alicia Kennedy on Substack, https://www.aliciakennedy.news/
    “How the US Dictates what Puerto Rico Eats” by Israel Meléndez Ayala and Alicia Kennedy, The New York Times (from 2021), https://www.nytimes.com/2021/10/01/opinion/puerto-rico-jones-act.html
    ​​For episode transcript and more, visit: https://realfoodmedia.org/portfolio/no-meat-required-the-cultural-history-and-culinary-future-of-plant-based-eating/
    Join the Real Food Reads book club: https://realfoodmedia.org/programs/real-food-reads/

    EPISODE CREDITS:
    Host: Anna Lappé
    Co-producers: Tanya Kerssen and Tiffani Patton
    Editor: Claire Reynolds

    • 33 min
    The Farm Bill Redux: Dan Imhoff | Re-release of Ep. 30

    The Farm Bill Redux: Dan Imhoff | Re-release of Ep. 30

    Can you believe five years have gone by since the last Farm Bill? It feels like a lifetime ago — SO much has changed politically. Bone up on your Farm Bill history and get ready to organize for a transformative Food & Farm Bill in 2023. This 2019 Real Food Reads interview with Dan Imhoff, farm policy expert and author of “The Farm Bill: A Citizen’s Guide,” is a great place to start.

    Follow Real Food Media wherever you get your podcasts.

    DIG DEEPER:
    Get the book - The Farm Bill: A Citizen’s Guide, https://islandpress.org/books/farm-bill

    HEAL Food Alliance’s Farm Bill 101, https://healfoodalliance.org/

    “This Farm Bill Really Matters. We Explain Why.” by Lisa Held, Civil Eats, March 20, 2023 https://civileats.com/2023/03/20/farm-bill-explainer-2023-bill-snap-nutrition-climate-smart-farming-commodities-insurance-congress/

    “HEAL Food Alliance Shows Up Big in DC for a Transformative Farm Bill” by Eloni Porcher, March 24, 2023 https://healfoodalliance.org/heal-food-alliance-shows-up-big-dc-for-a-transformative-farm-bill/

    • 28 min
    Silent Earth: Dave Goulson | Ep. 58

    Silent Earth: Dave Goulson | Ep. 58

    Insects are the often-times invisible workforce that take on planetary care. According to Dave Goulson, author of Silent Earth: Averting the Insect Apocalypse, “they pollinate, break down waste and provide food for us and countless other species. If they vanished tomorrow, the apocalypse would begin the next day.” Today, insect populations are in rapid decline, with estimates of population loss ranging from 40-75% across regions. The main drivers? Habitat loss and widespread use of dangerous chemicals—both of which are linked with industrial agriculture. In this special Real Food Reads episode commemorating the 60th anniversary of Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring, Anna Lappé speaks with Dave Goulson about agrichemicals, biodiversity, and how we, together, can avert the insect apocalypse.



    SHOW NOTES

    3:52 The importance of insects and the ecosystem services they provide

    6:00 An example of insects at work in Australia

    9:20 Unknown number of insect species, but we do know that insect populations are on the decline

    11:10 Industrialized agriculture is one of the main drivers of the astounding insect decline we have today

    13:05 How synthetic fertilizers impact the insect population

    17:42 Neonicotinoids (or neonics), the parallel to DDT, and their dangerous lethal and sublethal impacts on insecticides.

    24:01 If these chemicals are so dangerous, why hasn’t more action been taken?
    Where is the world still noisy?

    29:15 Where in the world is it still “noisy” and busy with insect biodiversity?

    32:30 What we can each do in our own ways to “avert the insect apocalypse”

    • 34 min
    The Nutmeg's Curse: Amitav Ghosh Ep. 59

    The Nutmeg's Curse: Amitav Ghosh Ep. 59

    When we speak of biodiversity loss, the climate crisis, and food injustice, we have to go to the root: colonialism. From the perspective and "voice" of the nutmeg, The Nutmeg’s Curse: Parables for a Planet in Crisis by acclaimed author Amitav Ghosh does just that. Ghosh was born in Calcutta and grew up in India, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka and is now based in Brooklyn. He’s the author of numerous works of fiction and nonfiction including The Great Derangement: Climate Change and the Unthinkable. His most recent book, The Nutmeg’s Curse, opens with the Dutch Empire’s brutal war in the Banda Islands—a small archipelago that’s part of what is now Indonesia—to establish a monopoly on the nutmeg trade. From there, he takes us halfway around the world and back again, weaving together stories of colonial violence, human resilience, and non-human agency.

    SHOW NOTES:
    2:32 | Why European navigators sailed off in search of spices in the 17th century
    4:00 | Dutch colonialism and the 1621 Banda Massacre
    9:46 | Nutmeg production as the earliest instance of industrial agriculture and racial capitalism (and why it matters)
    11:19 | Racialized workforces in agriculture around the world
    14:20 | The pleasures of gardening, including growing your own spices
    15:15 | How spices came to be devalued (and associated with “onanism”!)
    17:40 | On the mysteries of the vanilla plant
    20:40 | Environmentalism’s dark history (and present) of ethnic cleansing
    22:20 | The role of militarism in transforming food systems and contributing to the climate crisis
    23:30 | The Pentagon and other military institutions as the largest greenhouse gas emitters in the world, and yet they are excluded from climate negotiations
    25:42 | Amitav’s call for a “vitalist politics”

    DIG DEEPER:
    Follow Amitav Ghosh on Twitter: @GhoshAmitav
    Visit his blog: http://amitavghosh.com/blog/
    Buy the book: https://press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/N/bo125517349.html
    ​​For more on this episode, expanded show notes, and full transcript, visit: https://realfoodmedia.org/portfolio/the-nutmegs-curse/
    Join the Real Food Reads book club: https://realfoodmedia.org/programs/real-food-reads/
    Become a Patreon supporter for early access to our episodes and premium content with the authors here https://www.patreon.com/realfoodmedia

    • 28 min
    Fresh Banana Leaves Dr. Jessica Hernandez Ep. 57

    Fresh Banana Leaves Dr. Jessica Hernandez Ep. 57

    Indigenous people make up 5 percent of the global population and steward 80 percent of the world's biodiversity, yet they aren’t centered in most discussions or actions for environmental justice. An Indigenous woman and scientist, Dr. Jessica Hernandez talks about the importance of Indigenous science (and scientists) in her new book Fresh Banana Leaves: Healing Indigenous Landscapes through Indigenous Science. In this conversation, Jessica talks about the importance of Indigenous-led stewardship projects, Black-Indigenous solidarity, and shares the moving story of how she came to the book’s title.

    SHOW NOTES:
    1:51 | The difference between an interdisciplinary scientist and an Indigenous scientist

    3:50 | What is Indigenous science?

    5:50 | Indigenous people support 80% of the world’s biodiversity

    10:15 | Conservation as a Western construct and the trouble with the original concept of National Parks

    12:44 | The importance of #LandBack and Indigenous-led stewardship projects

    17:49 | The impact of banana plantations in Central America

    22:30 | The title of the book and the personal impact of war in El Salvador


    DIG DEEPER:
    To learn more about Dr. Jessica Hernandez, visit her site https://www.jessicabhernandez.com/
    Follow Jessica on Twitter: https://twitter.com/doctora_nature
    Buy the book: https://bookshop.org/books/fresh-banana-leaves-healing-indigenous-landscapes-through-indigenous-science
    ​​For more on this episode, expanded show notes, and full transcript, visit: https://realfoodmedia.org/portfolio/fresh-banana-leaves/

    Join the Real Food Reads book club: https://realfoodmedia.org/programs/real-food-reads/
    Become a Patreon supporter for early access to our episodes and premium content with the authors here https://www.patreon.com/realfoodmedia

    • 35 min
    Endangered Maize: Helen Anne Curry | Ep. 56

    Endangered Maize: Helen Anne Curry | Ep. 56

    There is a broad consensus around the “endangerment” of crop diversity—among scientists, advocates, policymakers, and corporations, actors who tend to disagree on a number of other issues. But Helen Anne Curry says: not so fast. Where does this endangerment narrative come from? Whose interests does it serve? And what assumptions does it make? Conventional approaches to crop conservation largely center on conserving seeds off-farm in gene banks, as opposed to protecting the livelihoods, communities, and farming systems of the peasants and Indigenous peoples who developed and steward those seeds. In this conversation, Curry delves into the history and science of seed conservation—and its implications for the future of food.

    SHOW NOTES:
    2:23 | What is the “endangerment narrative”?
    6:11 | Origins of endangerment in the early history of plant breeding and industrial agriculture
    14:35 | Endangerment as an outgrowth of settler colonialist & racist assumptions
    19:01 | Defining ex situ (off site) vs. in situ (on site) seed conservation
    24:08 | Does diversity change and evolve over time? Is crop diversity inevitably declining or can we think about crop diversity increasing?
    28:00 | Crisis thinking or crisis narratives
    34:03 | The story of glass gem corn
    37:15 | Difference between conventional and food sovereignty approaches to seed conservation

    DIG DEEPER:
    To learn more about Helen Anne Curry, visit http://www.helenannecurry.com/
    Follow Helen on Twitter: https://twitter.com/hacurry
    Buy the book: https://www.ucpress.edu/book/9780520307698/endangered-maize
    ​​For more on this episode, expanded show notes, and full transcript, visit: https://realfoodmedia.org/portfolio/endangered-maize-industrial-agriculture-and-the-crisis-of-extinction/
    Join the Real Food Reads book club: https://realfoodmedia.org/programs/real-food-reads/
    Become a Patreon supporter for early access to our episodes and premium content with the authors here: https://www.patreon.com/realfoodmedia

    • 39 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
29 Ratings

29 Ratings

ffacee ,

The Food Issues we need to be talking about

FoodTopias is for the people! There’s a lot of podcasts on personal nutrition and fun conversations with superstar chefs, but how many are highlighting food workers at the less glamorous points in the food chain or the people who are actually addressing food injustice in their communities? FoodTopias is filling that need and my ears are so happy to hear it!

a1d1k1 ,

Love this podcast!!

I love this podcast! It gives me hope that we can actually build a more equitable and just world if we apply it to our relationship to food . I always come away having learned something new and I especially loved the Bryant Terry interview and any episode hosted by Tiffani!!

corEy_sb ,

Foodtopias is awesome!

They have incredible guests who are on the front lines of the fight for a more just food system. The interviews are thoughtful. One of my favorite podcasts right now!

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