10 episodes

Welcome to Rebel Women, a podcast about the history of troublemakers in East London. This corner of Britain's capital has seen multiple waves of migration, poverty and persecution. Sometimes feared, always looked down upon, the residents have struggled.
But out of these struggles rose up some of history's greatest radicals leaders - leaders of movements that have changed both the local landscape, and wider society too. Many of them were women. And most you will have never heard about, despite their huge achievements.
Esther Freeman has spent five years poking around in archives and conducting oral history interviews, pulling together a collection of East London's hidden histories. These women shaped our society, they fought on when nobody thought they could win. There is so much we can achieve by honouring their memories and learning their lessons.
Our first series features nine stories. We will introduce you to lesbian suffragettes; the socialist socialite Daisy Greville; and the Dagenham Ford Machinists, a group of working class women who ushered in the 1970 Equal Pay Act.
Subscribe to our weekly podcast and discover more at eastlondonwomen.org.uk.

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Rebel Women Esther Freeman

    • History
    • 5.0 • 1 Rating

Welcome to Rebel Women, a podcast about the history of troublemakers in East London. This corner of Britain's capital has seen multiple waves of migration, poverty and persecution. Sometimes feared, always looked down upon, the residents have struggled.
But out of these struggles rose up some of history's greatest radicals leaders - leaders of movements that have changed both the local landscape, and wider society too. Many of them were women. And most you will have never heard about, despite their huge achievements.
Esther Freeman has spent five years poking around in archives and conducting oral history interviews, pulling together a collection of East London's hidden histories. These women shaped our society, they fought on when nobody thought they could win. There is so much we can achieve by honouring their memories and learning their lessons.
Our first series features nine stories. We will introduce you to lesbian suffragettes; the socialist socialite Daisy Greville; and the Dagenham Ford Machinists, a group of working class women who ushered in the 1970 Equal Pay Act.
Subscribe to our weekly podcast and discover more at eastlondonwomen.org.uk.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    The Battle for Equal Pay part 5: Dagenham Ford Machinists (1968 and beyond)

    The Battle for Equal Pay part 5: Dagenham Ford Machinists (1968 and beyond)

    Rebel Women is a podcast about history's troublemakers.
    This episode is the final instalment of our five-part series about the battle for equal pay; a journey that spans nearly 100 years, from the late 1880s to the 1970 Equal Pay Act.
    The 1960s was a decade unlike any other. Young people across the world were rising up - with opposition to the Vietnam War, the 1968–69 civil unrest in France, the US civil rights movement and Women's Liberation.
    But while Soho and Mayfair may have been swinging with style and revolution, out in the East London suburbs it was quite a different picture. In working class corners of the capital, post-war traditionalism ran alongside social and cultural change. While middle class women may have enjoyed new opportunities and freedoms, in places like Dagenham the options remained slim and wages low.
    The fight for equal pay may have been forgotten altogether if it hadn't been for a group of working class women at the Ford factory in Dagenham. Change was coming, but would it be enough?
    For show notes, reading lists and further stories about East London women, visit our website eastlondonwomen.org.uk. Or find us on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Instagram or Pinterest. 
    Rebel Women is part of the Women Activists of East London project, which has been developed by Share UK, a non-profit community group based in London. 
    Special thanks to the Barry Amiel and Norman Melburn Trust for their support of today's episode.
     
    Main theme by DanoSongs. Incidental music by Purple Planet Music.
    Produced and edited by Steve Woodward at PodcastingEditor.com.
    Further reading and links
    Dagenham sewing machinists recall strike that changed women's lives (Simon Goodley, The Guardian, 6 June 2013)
    Protests in Paris, May 1968 – photographs then and now (Alicia Canter and Guy Lane, The Guardian, 2 May 2018)
    My part in the anti-war demo that changed protest for ever (Donald Macintyre, The Guardian, 11 March 2018)

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    • 16 min
    The Battle for Equal Pay part 4: Women war workers are back (1939-1945)

    The Battle for Equal Pay part 4: Women war workers are back (1939-1945)

    Rebel Women is a podcast about history's troublemakers.
    This episode is the fourth in our five-part series about the battle for equal pay; a journey that spans nearly 100 years, from the late 1880s to the 1970 Equal Pay Act.
    As the Second World War began, women rose up once again to do their bit. They went to factories producing munitions. They built ships and aeroplanes. In the auxiliary services they became air-raid wardens, fire officers and drove ambulances, trains and trams. They worked on the railways, canals and on buses. They even built Waterloo Bridge.
    As with World War One, the same anxieties rose up about women in the workplace. And the same issues surrounding wage inequality refused to go away. But this time, women were not messing around.
    For the first time they started to win claims for equal pay. However, the gains were not all everyone hoped for.
    For show notes, reading lists and further stories about East London women, visit our website eastlondonwomen.org.uk. Or find us on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Instagram or Pinterest.
    Rebel Women is part of the Women Activists of East London project, which has been developed by Share UK, a non-profit community group based in London. 
    Special thanks to the Barry Amiel and Norman Melburn Trust for their support of today's episode.
     
    Main theme by DanoSongs. Incidental music by Purple Planet Music.
    Produced and edited by Steve Woodward at PodcastingEditor.com.
     
    Further reading and links
    Millions like Us – Women's Lives During the Second World War by Virginia Nicholson
    Women and work - World War II: 1939-1945 (StrikingWomen.org)
    Air Transport Auxiliary website (Museum & Archive at Maidenhead Heritage Centre)

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    • 17 min
    The Battle for Equal Pay part 3: Teachers Keep Fighting (1920s and 30s)

    The Battle for Equal Pay part 3: Teachers Keep Fighting (1920s and 30s)

    Rebel Women is a podcast about history's troublemakers.
    This episode is the third in our five-part series about the battle for equal pay; a journey that spans nearly 100 years, from the late 1880s to the 1970 Equal Pay Act.
    The outbreak of war in 1914 cause huge disruption to the education system. As men enlisted, women stepped up to fill the sudden gaping hole in Britain's classrooms. But while women now made up the majority in teaching, their pay remained unequal.
    Many women teachers were ex-suffragettes, and they weren't going down without a fight.
    For show notes, reading lists and further stories about East London women, visit our website eastlondonwomen.org.uk. Or find us on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Instagram or Pinterest.
    Rebel Women is part of the Women Activists of East London project, which has been developed by Share UK, a non-profit community group based in London. 
    Special thanks to the Barry Amiel and Norman Melburn Trust for their support of today's episode.
     
    Main theme by DanoSongs. Incidental music by Purple Planet Music.
    Produced and edited by Steve Woodward at PodcastingEditor.com.
     
    Further reading and links
    Women Teachers and Feminist Politics by Alison Oram
    (currently out of print, available used through Amazon)
    On New Women:
    Daughters of decadence: the New Woman in the Victorian fin de siècle by Greg Buzwell (British Library)
    On Ethel Froud:
    Ethel Froud suffragette & NUWT secretary by Hilda Kean
    On the National Union of Women Teachers:
    A guide to the National Union of Women Teachers Archive Collection (University College London Library Services)

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    • 13 min
    The Battle for Equal Pay part 2: Women War Time Workers (1900 - 1918)

    The Battle for Equal Pay part 2: Women War Time Workers (1900 - 1918)

    Episode 6
    The battle for Equal Pay part 2: Women War Time Workers (1900-1918)
    Rebel Women is a podcast about history's troublemakers.
    This episode is the second in a five-part series about the battle for equal pay; a journey that spans nearly 100 years, from the late 1880s to the 1970 Equal Pay Act.
    On the eve of the First World War, women's lives revolved around the home; a sheltered life of servitude to the family. And while some did work, employment options were normally limited and unfulfilling, with most ending up in domestic service.
    But during the First World War, it wasn't long before the principal of women's place being in the home began to crumble. Male conscription forced employers to accept they needed women's labour and by the end of the war, at least one million women had been added to the British workforce.
    But this rise in organised labour did not lead to equal pay. Women were merely interlopers, holding the jobs until the men returned. It made sense that they should be paid less.
    For show notes, reading lists and further stories about East London women, visit our website eastlondonwomen.org.uk. Or find us on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Instagram or Pinterest.
    Rebel Women is part of the Women Activists of East London project, which has been developed by Share UK, a non-profit community group based in London. 
    Special thanks to the Barry Amiel and Norman Melburn Trust for their support of today's episode.
     
    Main theme by DanoSongs. Incidental music by Purple Planet Music.
    Produced and edited by Steve Woodward at PodcastingEditor.com.
     
    Further reading and links
    The Road to Equality (Winning Equal Pay: the value of women's work)
    12 Things You Didn't Know About Women In The First World War (Imperial War Museum)
    Women and domestic service in Victorian society by Kate Clarke (The History Press)
    Commemorating Silvertown: 100 years after London's largest explosion (Museum of London and the Museum of London Docklands)
    Women's work in WW1 (Striking Women)
    Sylvia Pankhurst (Spartacus Educational)
    The London transport women workers' strike, 1918 by Ken Weller (libcom.org)

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    • 14 min
    The Battle for Equal Pay part 1: The Family Wage (1850 - 1900)

    The Battle for Equal Pay part 1: The Family Wage (1850 - 1900)

    Rebel Women is a podcast about history's troublemakers.
    This episode is the first in a five-part series about the battle for equal pay; a journey that spans nearly 100 years, from the late 1880s to the 1970 Equal Pay Act.
    Much of this battle has taken place in the boroughs of East London, and there is a clear reason for this. People join unions when they feel under threat – you see higher membership in dangerous trades like coal mining than you do in safe jobs like journalism. In East London, industrial accidents and even death were a daily occurrence. A union was a form of insurance, providing some protection against those everyday risks.
    Organising women's labour wasn't straight forward however. To start with, there were a lot less of them. And they often didn't have the support of their male colleagues. 
    For show notes, reading lists and further stories about East London women, visit our website eastlondonwomen.org.uk. Or find us on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Instagram or Pinterest.
    Rebel Women is part of the Women Activists of East London project, which has been developed by Share UK, a non-profit community group based in London.
    Special thanks to the Barry Amiel and Norman Melburn Trust for their support of today's episode.
     
    Music by DanoSongs. 
    Produced and edited by Steve Woodward at PodcastingEditor.com.
    Further reading and links
    The Industrial Revolution by Matthew White (British Library, 14 Oct 2009) 
    "Rouse, Ye Women": The Cradley Heath Chain Makers' Strike, 1910 (Online Exhibition, Modern Records Centre, University of Warwick Library) 
    Clementina Black, Fantasy CV (TUC 150 Website) 
    Clementina Black (Spartacus Educational) 
    Mary Macarthur (Working Class Movement Library) 
    Mary Macarthur and the Sweated Industries (Historic England)
    J is for Jam Maker (Amanda Wilkinson's Victorian Occupations, 10 March 2016) 
    An Historical Introduction to the Campaign for Equal Pay by Mary Davis (Winning Equal Pay: the value of women's work)

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    • 19 min
    Walthamstow's Radical Women

    Walthamstow's Radical Women

    Rebel Women is a podcast about history's troublemakers.
     
    This episode brings you an audio guided tour of Walthamstow's radical past. The tour was originally intended to be delivered in association with JoyRiders, an organisation which empowers women by introducing them to the joys of cycling.
     
    Walthamstow is mentioned in the Domesday Book as a manor owned by an Anglo-Saxon nobleman called Earl Waltheof. It later became a rural development with a small village centre, now known as Walthamstow Village. It was popular with the gentry, who used it as a retreat from the hustle and bustle of the city.
     
    Trailblazing Walthamstow women discussed along the route include: Daisy Greville, Countess of Warwick, a campaigning socialist and early member of Britain's first socialist political party, the Social Democratic Federation (SDF); Karpal Kaur Sandhu, the world's first Asian female police officer; housing activists Melanie Briggs and Nicole Holgate; Hibo Wardere, who led the fight against FGM in Britain; and more.
     
    For show notes, reading lists and further stories about East London women, visit our website eastlondonwomen.org.uk. Or find us on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Instagram or Pinterest.
     
    Rebel Women is part of the Women Activists of East London project, which has been developed by Share UK, a non-profit community group based in London.
     
    Special thanks to the National Heritage Lottery Fund for their support of today's episode.
     
    Main theme by DanoSongs.
     
    Produced and edited by Steve Woodward at PodcastingEditor.com.
     
    Further reading and links
     
    JoyRiders London
     
    JoyRiders video cycle tour of Walthamstow (YouTube)
     
    A People's History of Walthamstow by James Diamond (The History Press)
     
    May Morris: Art & Life, New Perspectives - edited by Lynn Hulse (William Morris Gallery)
     
    Cut: One Women's Fight Against FGM in Britain Today by Hibo Wardere (Goodreads link)
     
    Butterfields Won't Budge Facebook group
     
    Educate to Eradicate website

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    • 32 min

Customer Reviews

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1 Rating

@ordinaryletters ,

Excellent!

I’m listening to your Equal Pay series and I’m so impressed. Not only are you a great story teller with a great voice, the production quality is exceptional as well. You have a new subscriber.

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