207 episodes

I have always loved the idea that God is more than just a name or even idea; rather, that God is a verb. In God, we “live and move and have our being”. Everything we do is a response to what God has already done.

So when I started to consider a name for this blog, reVerb came quite easily. We are responding to God’s word moving in and through us.

If you are visiting this blog, it is most likely because you are responding to the Word that you heard this past Sunday. Of course, you don’t hear the Word of God (though you can read it linked to this page); rather you will hear my homily as a commentary on the Word, as it was heard this past Sunday.

The idea is quite simple: Catholics rarely take notes during Mass, so I thought it might be helpful to record my homilies so you can hear them again, or in the case of those who are ill or far away, you now have access to a homily you didn’t hear before.

This blog is also an easy way to share what you are learning with your friends and family who do not come to church. You an either listen online or subscribe to the RSS Feed and download it to your portable media player (see the next page for those instructions).

In the end, all I ask in return is that you pray for me as I do my best to interpret the Word of God for myself and those around me.

Many blessings,

Fr. Chris Valka, CSB

reVerb Homilies Fr. Chris Valka, CSB

    • Christianity

I have always loved the idea that God is more than just a name or even idea; rather, that God is a verb. In God, we “live and move and have our being”. Everything we do is a response to what God has already done.

So when I started to consider a name for this blog, reVerb came quite easily. We are responding to God’s word moving in and through us.

If you are visiting this blog, it is most likely because you are responding to the Word that you heard this past Sunday. Of course, you don’t hear the Word of God (though you can read it linked to this page); rather you will hear my homily as a commentary on the Word, as it was heard this past Sunday.

The idea is quite simple: Catholics rarely take notes during Mass, so I thought it might be helpful to record my homilies so you can hear them again, or in the case of those who are ill or far away, you now have access to a homily you didn’t hear before.

This blog is also an easy way to share what you are learning with your friends and family who do not come to church. You an either listen online or subscribe to the RSS Feed and download it to your portable media player (see the next page for those instructions).

In the end, all I ask in return is that you pray for me as I do my best to interpret the Word of God for myself and those around me.

Many blessings,

Fr. Chris Valka, CSB

    The Solemnity of the Ascension

    The Solemnity of the Ascension

    HUMAN HOLINESS

    The Ascension is most closely related, in meaning, to Christmas, for both are incarnational.  At Christmas, what it means to be God became fully a part of what it means to be human.  In Jesus, the human and divine become united in the person and life of one man. That’s what happened in Christmas. 

    At the Ascension, this human being – the person and the resurrected body of Jesus – became for all eternity a part of who God is.  The life of a single human being is forever joined to the life of God the Father, the one who created the heavens and the earth. 

    It was not the spirit of Jesus or the divine nature of Jesus that ascended to the Father.  It was the resurrected body of Jesus: a body that the disciples had touched, a body that ate and drank with them, a real physical, but gloriously resurrected body, bearing the marks of nails and a spear.  This is what ascended.

    • 6 min
    Commencement Address for Holy Trinity High School

    Commencement Address for Holy Trinity High School

    RITUAL AND TRANSITION

    First of all, I want to congratulate you on all that has brought you to this day, as well as the people who have brought you here: your families, friends, mentors, teachers, coaches and supporters. It is an honor to be able to celebrate this moment with you.

    Ironically, it is a day I did not participate in myself. I simply didn’t like the pomp and circumstance, and I have never liked a lot of attention.

    What I did not appreciate in my younger years, and most certainly something I appreciate now, is the importance of ritual. It is an old-sounding kind of word, usually conjuring images of royalty, or medieval or primal images in our mind. But I assure you, we are ritualistic people because they help us to accept the changes that are necessary in order for us to grow. We need moments when we break our routine and recognize that we are different . . . as do the people around us. We need moments to celebrate, lest we forget how far we have come – because we have.

    • 12 min
    5th Sunday of Easter

    5th Sunday of Easter

    5th Sunday of Easter by Fr. Chris Valka, CSB

    • 7 min
    4th Sunday of Easter

    4th Sunday of Easter

    MOTHER'S DAY

    Traditionally, today is known as Good Shepherd Sunday because of the shepherd and the sheep who hear his voice.  Of course, it is also Mother’s Day – a day when we also celebrate our shepherds who have sheep who don’t always hear their voice!

    It is a day when I always feel little awkward trying to reflect on the experience of motherhood.  The sanctity of the relationship between a mother and child gives me pause and leaves me humbled.  I don’t know if I could ever have enough courage to allow my soul to live inside another person, but as far as I can tell, that is often what mothers do. 

    Thus, I want to share a story I read from the book "Untie the Strong Woman" by Clarissa Pinkola Estes.

    • 6 min
    Third Sunday of Easter

    Third Sunday of Easter

    Next Sunday, the fourth Sunday of Easter, is commonly known as Good Shepherd Sunday, because of the Gospel regarding the sheep who hear the Master’s voice. And for that reason, it is also regarded as day when speak about vocations - to the priesthood specifically, though most homilists include all vocations.

    However, my experience has taught me that today’s Gospel is really the more accurate one about vocations – especially to the priesthood. Next week is the nice version – the much more attractive version. This week is about the hard reality.

    “Do you love me”, Jesus asks. Then follow me to where you do not want to go. Follow me and you will die, and it will be glorious. This is the life of service and sacrifice. This is priesthood. And it is not that I don’t want to go, but rather, I am mindful of the death that is required.

    These days there is a lot of talk about priesthood and a great deal of criticism (for good reasons), but today I think I would like to speak about it all from a different point of view – from that of today’s Gospel where love leads us to follow no matter the costs.

    • 11 min
    Second Sunday of Easter

    Second Sunday of Easter

    THE MOTIVATION OF CHANGE

    What is it that Thomas couldn’t believe?  That Jesus rose again?  That Jesus appeared to his friends?  Perhaps it was that he and his friends would be able to do even greater works than Jesus? That they would have the power of the Holy Spirit to forgive sins and transform the world?  That they could set a foundation, then, for what we do today?  

    Admittedly, that is a little hard to believe. 

    I think we, too, would do well to assess our belief.  Do we really believe that we are capable of all that Jesus did?  Do we really believe that we can do the miracles we read about in the Bible?  Do we really believe that our forgiveness is also the forgiveness of God; and likewise, that what we cannot forgive, is held against them and us? 

    Every year we hear this story of Thomas right after Easter.  We hear it because we all struggle with believing in the promises of Christ.  Perhaps you are more doubtful of those promises this year than in the past.  Perhaps you can believe more easily.

    • 10 min

Customer Reviews

Joser2112 ,

Excellent Homilies

If you ever leave mass feeling you wanted more from the homily, Fr. Chris has a good one for you.

Fr. Chris delivers homilies that bring the weeks readings into focus and gives us a clear challenge, idea, or question that we can carry forward into the week.

Concise and potent.

Top Podcasts In Christianity