28 episodes

If Ben Stein and the Kardashians had a baby that were raised by Janeane Garofalo in a recording studio, you’d have RhetoricLee Speaking, a podcast about how we use language and language uses is. Join hostess with the mostess and rhetorical scholar extraordinaire, Lee Pierce, in a whirlwind tour of banality across pop culture, political controversy, and whatever was on Netflix at 3am.

RhetoricLee Speaking Lee M Pierce

    • Society & Culture
    • 5.0 • 162 Ratings

If Ben Stein and the Kardashians had a baby that were raised by Janeane Garofalo in a recording studio, you’d have RhetoricLee Speaking, a podcast about how we use language and language uses is. Join hostess with the mostess and rhetorical scholar extraordinaire, Lee Pierce, in a whirlwind tour of banality across pop culture, political controversy, and whatever was on Netflix at 3am.

    When Black Women Speak

    When Black Women Speak

    Read the blog version: 


     


    Today's episode is a reading of an excerpt from the introduction of my now defunct book manuscript, "When Black Women Speak: The Politics of White Listening." Enjoy!


    Read the blog: https://rhetoriclee.com/when-black-women-speak/


    *Learn more at https://rhetoriclee.com 


    *Follow the show  on Facebook and on Instagram @rhetoriclee 


    *Subscribe to the show on iTunes/Apple Podcasts, on Google Podcasts, on Stitcher, on Youtube, on Spotify, or via RSS


    *Take 20 seconds to leave a short review and 5 star-rating (I’ll even take 4 stars, I’m not greedy). Reviews help future #rhetoricnerds find the show!


    *Have thoughts? Hit me up on social media or at rhetoriclee@gmail.com

    • 15 min
    Jargon, Exemplars and Brene Brown

    Jargon, Exemplars and Brene Brown

    Takeaways:


    Jargon, sometimes called buzzwords, sometimes called slang, sometimes called bureaucratese, is basically non-standard language meant to bring into being non-standard thought. Jargon is inclusive and expands our collective understanding about the world when it is used carefully, defined, in tons of examples, and solves a problem by bringing a different awareness than other words in its orbit. However, jargon is exclusive and narrows our collective understanding about the world when it used in piles and lists (a rhetorical device known as amplificatio or sometimes enumeratio), when jargon is defined by referring to other jargon, when it is only supported by one or two perfect examples, and doesn’t seem to solve a problem by bringing more awareness then other words in its orbit.


    Exemplar is a word for the model of the model, the most perfect example, the “for instance” that makes the theory work perfectly. If you’re using exemplars to illustrate your jargon then you’re making that jargon inaccessible by not letting it come into contact with the real world, which is messy and complex. The name of Brown’s exemplar is Suzanne (you’re going to be hearing a lot about Suzanne today).


    Piling up jargon is great for creating brand followers and cult-like acolytes and people who will buy everything that comes out of your mouth and whose lives are exactly like yours. It also sells a lot of certified leadership coaching problems because it puts strategies for improvement out of reach, behind a wall of concepts and terminology and jargon, and requires we pay someone else to walk us through our own minds and lives. (FYI one of the first sentences out of Brown’s mouth in this episode is about her thousands of certified “Dared to Lead” trainers)


    Read the blog post:


    Resources used in this episode:


    Brené on Armored versus Daring Leadership, Part 1 of 2 | Brené Brown

    Brene Brown Advice - How to Be Yourself


    Read the blog version: https://rhetoriclee.com/jargon-exemplars-and-brene-brown/


    *Learn more at https://rhetoriclee.com 


    *Follow the show  on Facebook and on Instagram @rhetoriclee 


    *Subscribe to the show on iTunes/Apple Podcasts, on Google Podcasts, on Stitcher, on Youtube, on Spotify, or via RSS


    *Take 20 seconds to leave a short review and 5 star-rating (I’ll even take 4 stars, I’m not greedy). Reviews help future #rhetoricnerds find the show!


    *Have thoughts? Hit me up on social media or at rhetoriclee@gmail.com

    • 25 min
    Language Lowdown: Defending 'I Feel Like'

    Language Lowdown: Defending 'I Feel Like'

    This episode is a reading of a recent piece by Amanda Montell for Sunday Edit titled "Language Lowdown: Why Phrases Like "I Feel Like" and "If That Makes Sense" Aren't Actually Bad." Montell's piece discusses patriarchal language standards and the importance of critiquing our norms for "authoritative speech" and it features my two cents about language as something we want to use intentionally not necessarily "correctly" (because standards for correctness are caught up in all kinds of sexism, ableism, racism, colorism, classism, etc.)


    Read the piece at https://edit.sundayriley.com/language-lowdown-why-phrases-like-i-feel-like-and-if-that-makes-sense-arent-actually-bad/


     


    *Learn more at https://rhetoriclee.com 


    *Follow the show  on Facebook and on Instagram @rhetoriclee 


    *Subscribe to the show on iTunes/Apple Podcasts, on Google Podcasts, on Stitcher, on Youtube, on Spotify, or via RSS


    *Take 20 seconds to leave a short review and 5 star-rating (I’ll even take 4 stars, I’m not greedy). Reviews help future #rhetoricnerds find the show!


    *Have thoughts? Hit me up on social media or Gmail @rhetoriclee

    • 9 min
    Free Speech Hate Speech Counter Speech

    Free Speech Hate Speech Counter Speech

    The first crossover episode between May it Displease the Court, which looks at corruption in the courts from judges through dark money anti-democratic far-Right donors, and RhetoricLee Speaking, banishing banality one speech at a time. Your co-hosts, Mary and Lee, look at censorship, free speech vs. hate speech, and counter speech. Here are the highlights:


    1) as much as we may want the law to recognize hate speech sometimes when truly vile opinions (in our opinions) are being circulated, the law does not recognize a hate speech exception to the first amendment that guarantees the right to free speech and 


    2) if there were such an exception it would be used to suppress minoritized people and their fight for civil liberties more often than it would be to silence transphobic, racist, sexist, and other kinds of exclusionary speech.


    We take you through a few cases that have been instrumental in establishing the “no hate speech” exception including Snyder v. Phelps SCOTUS 2011 (Westboro Baptist Church) and Clark v. Community for Creative Non-Violence , 468 U. S. 288 


    We also look at some personal examples. Mary discusses an experience at the Anne Frank House right after 9-11 and Lee discusses a current campus event where the free speech of a racist and transphobic student is being protected. They also discuss potential alternative terms to replace hate speech, including “racist erasure” and “transphobic erasure.”


    Finally, Mary explains the issue of “school-sponsored speech,” in which first amendment rights come up against the purpose of educational institutions and the need for more counter-speech on the Left as the corrective for hateful-speech-that-isn’t-hate-speech by the anti-democratic far-Right funded by pro-corporate dark money donors.


    Check out May it Displease the Court on Apple Podcasts, Podbean, and Spotify!


    Resources


    The Dark Money Behind Campus Speech Wars

    First Amendment | US Constitution

    Harry CONNICK, Individually and in His Capacity as District Attorney, etc., Petitioner, v. Sheila MYERS.

    CITY OF SAN DIEGO ET AL. v. ROE

    William P. CLARK, Secretary of the Interior, et al., Petitioners v. COMMUNITY FOR CREATIVE NON-VIOLENCE et al.

    Fairness Doctrine: History and Constitutional Issues

    Local and Independent Television Protection Act would overturn a Trump-era rule that’s permitted…

    Watch Field of Vision - Do Not Split about the suppression of Hong Kong pro-democracy protests


    Read the blog version:


    https://rhetoriclee.com/free-speech-hate-speech-counter-speech/


    *Learn more at https://rhetoriclee.com 


    *Follow the show  on Facebook and on Instagram @rhetoriclee 


    *Subscribe to the show on iTunes/Apple Podcasts, on Google Podcasts, on Stitcher, on Youtube, on Spotify, or via RSS


    *Take 20 seconds to leave a short review and 5 star-rating (I’ll even take 4 stars, I’m not greedy). Reviews help future #rhetoricnerds find the show!


    *Have thoughts? Hit me up on social media or Gmail @rhetoriclee

    • 57 min
    Linguistic Reparations, Or Why I Don’t Say Ni**

    Linguistic Reparations, Or Why I Don’t Say Ni**

    The problem with phrasing the rules or norms or whatever you want to call them around the word n-i** as a prohibition, as a thou shalt not, is that not only does it NOT address the more implicit racism of feeling entitled to say the word when there’s no one around “to be offended,” but it also begs the very people to transgress that you’re trying to get to stop transgressing because most people--especially people who fancy themselves edgy intellectuals or truth tellers or the last stalwarts of free speech against woke liberal scolds--when they hear a prohibition, their first instinct is to violate it.


    Resources from this episode:


    Ice Cube and Symone Sanders on White Privilege | Real Time with Bill Maher (HBO)

    The Idea That Whites Can’t Refer to the N-Word

    Female Comics Sound Off on Kevin Hart, Louis C.K. and Comedy in the Age of Trump

    STATEMENT of THE DRAMMEH INSTITUTE REGIONAL MEETING FOR EUROPE, CENTRAL ASIA AND NORTH AMERICA ON THE INTERNATIONAL DECADE FOR PEOPLE OF AFRICAN DESCENT 

    Chris Rock Has No Time for Your Ignorance (Published 1997)

    http://www.drammehinstitute.org/about.html


    Read the blog version: https://rhetoriclee.com/linguistic-reparations-or-why-i-dont-say-ni/


    *Learn more at https://rhetoriclee.com 


    *Follow the show  on Facebook and on Instagram @rhetoriclee 


    *Subscribe to the show on iTunes/Apple Podcasts, on Google Podcasts, on Stitcher, on Youtube, on Spotify, or via RSS


    *Take 20 seconds to leave a short review and 5 star-rating (I’ll even take 4 stars, I’m not greedy). Reviews help future #rhetoricnerds find the show!


    *Have thoughts? Hit me up on social media or Gmail @rhetoriclee

    • 23 min
    BONUS: Listen to Lee on the Unapologetically Unleashed Podcast

    BONUS: Listen to Lee on the Unapologetically Unleashed Podcast

    I chatted recently with Nadeje of the Unleashed Unapologetically podcast about thought work, rhetoric, tension, cliches, and internal debate. The episode is called "The Thoughts About the Thoughts." Click on the link below to listen.


    Listen on Spotify


    Listen on Apple Podcasts


    Listen on Anchor


    Listen on the Web

    • 1 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
162 Ratings

162 Ratings

erikbuckingham ,

Unique and informative

Very informative yet relaxed! I like that it feels like I’m learning university level material but in a relaxed, accessible way. The examples Lee uses are relevant and although you can tell she’s passionate about the topic, the podcast still feels relaxed.

Shawngolfer ,

Wonderful teacher and commentator!

I love Lee Marie’s method of teaching how to speak publicly. I’m an engineer and a sales woman and her tips about how to speak are invaluable. Every podcast I learn something and try it immediately and it works! She explains how we get stuck in cliches and how and when to use helpful anecdotes! Plus her perspective on culture and our world are candid and insightful! Love your podcast!

Annyinthedesert ,

Who’d have thought...

a podcast about words, how we use them, and how they’re used in media phenomena would be so entertaining and thought provoking? This baby bomber is no longer annoyed at her 30 something year-old offspring using the f- bomb to express depth of feeling and really pays attention to how words are being used.

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