50 episodes

Conversations with exemplary leaders investing their passion and talents across all domains of life and work. They work with an entrepreneurial spirit characterized by resourcefulness, energy and a commitment to leading financially successful, sustainable organizations that make a positive contribution to society.

Rise Leaders Radio LeeAnn Mallory

    • Business
    • 4.9 • 17 Ratings

Conversations with exemplary leaders investing their passion and talents across all domains of life and work. They work with an entrepreneurial spirit characterized by resourcefulness, energy and a commitment to leading financially successful, sustainable organizations that make a positive contribution to society.

    49 You‘ve Defined Your Values: Have You Operationalized Them?

    49 You‘ve Defined Your Values: Have You Operationalized Them?

    “Don’t tell me what you value; show me your budget, and I’ll tell you what you value.” –Joe Biden


    Put your values into action
    A lot of energy goes into defining an organization's Vision, Mission and Values. It's an exciting time and an inspiring exercise. Usually, steps are taken to put this Core Ideology into action but it often remains separate from the hard core center of the business. It doesn't have to be that way. MaryBeth Hyland dedicates the second half of her book, "Permission to be Human: The Conscious Leader's Guide to Creating a Values-Driven Culture" to this topic.

    During our previous conversation (Episode 48), MaryBeth and I discussed wellbeing and mental health in the workplace. Today, we focus on integrating values into cultural norms and operations, top to bottom.

    Put simply, MaryBeth shares how to “walk the talk.” She shows how to catapult your values into action throughout your organization – and explains the consequences of failing to do so. Operationalizing your values is the pivotal next step for seeing your values leap off the conference room posters to make a tangible impact.


    Be clear about expectations concerning values when hiring
    [08:09] “You need to have your values as a part of your process for hiring. Because it is not fair, it is not kind to hire somebody without clear expectations of how they're going to be showing up every day.


    Your values guide your actions
    [08:28] “Your vision is your ‘why’ and your mission is what your values are - your ‘how.’ If you have clearly stated values of how you're going to go about accomplishing your ‘what’ and your ‘why,’ but you don't hold anyone accountable to them, then you're basically telling people, they don't matter, and they're not real.”


    Tracking alignment to your values
    [16:28] “You can look at a budget, let's say, for an organization overall, and start connecting line items to values. You could say, ‘Oh, wow, 70% of our budget is skewed towards 'excellence', whereas we really need to beef up our areas of 'people first'."

    [16:51] “And that's the same for our schedules – being able to color-code your schedule based on the values you're activating. When you visually look at your time, you can see, 'how much am I really investing in these values that I'm here to embody? And how can I start to balance those out?'”

    [15:20] “If you really want change, and depth and width in what you're trying to create with operationalizing your values, you need to invest in them financially as well.”

    Connect with MaryBeth Hyland on LinkedIn
    https://www.linkedin.com/in/marybethhyland


    Get support as an organization or individual at https://sparkvisionnow.com 


    "Permission to Be Human: The Conscious Leader's Guide to Creating a Values-Driven Culture"
    https://www.amazon.com/Permission-Be-Human-Conscious-Values-Driven-ebook/dp/B0965XWV49


    Rise Leaders Radio Episode 45: 7 Elements of a Winning Culture www.rise-leaders.com/podcast


    To discuss executive coaching, leadership development program design, and workshop facilitation, please visit:
    https://rise-leaders.com/contact-info/

    • 38 min
    #48 Permission to Be Human: Caring Deeply About People & Their Wellbeing at Work

    #48 Permission to Be Human: Caring Deeply About People & Their Wellbeing at Work

    “This book is a love letter to any fellow humans who have felt like they were the underdogs for deeply caring about people and their wellbeing at work.” – MaryBeth Hyland, Permission to Be Human: A Conscious Leader’s Guide to Creating a Values-Driven Culture



    Wellbeing at work
    Just as we go to a doctor if we break an arm, we should treat ourselves with the same level of respect when it comes to our mental, emotional, and spiritual wellbeing – even at work. While we might not think of spirituality at work, I put it in the domain of wisdom and purpose, vision or values – important guiding pillars for showing up as your best self. It all plays a role.

    This is the groundwork for my conversation with MaryBeth Hyland. She’s the founder of SparkVision, a firm committed to creating environments where people thrive. Especially in the past year and a half, our mental health may have taken a hit – and it’s important to recognize it’s likely the same with those we interact with each day.

    From our discussion, you’ll learn:
    - What’s included in the term “wellbeing”?
    - How do you approach someone if you notice they’re having difficulty with their mental health?
    - How do you address the fact you were hurt by someone who's in a tough place mentally?




    Invest in your relationships at work
    [10:43] “So much of it has to do with your relationship … It's a short- and long-term relationship that involves a lot of investments in each other to feel like it's coming from a place of caring and wanting to help people in their wellbeing instead of maybe wanting to call them out, or stigmatize, or make them feel like something's even more wrong.”
    [15:48] “The more you're willing to share of yourself, the more willing other people are to share.”




    Establishing boundaries
    [20:05] “There's a big misconception with boundaries that boundaries are about controlling other people. But boundaries are actually about creating an environment that’s good for you, that's going to take care of your wellbeing.”



    Taking ownership for your part
    [24:30] “To truly be sorry, you have to be willing to sit with what the other person experienced and hold space for that just like they did for you, when you were on the other side of it.”


     


    Connect with Mary Beth Hyland on LinkedIn:


    https://www.linkedin.com/in/marybethhyland/


    Learn More about Spark Vision:


    https://www.sparkvisionnow.com/


    Work Life with Adam Grant https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/we-should-allow-sad-days-not-just-sick-days/id1346314086?i=1000530163973


    Be Well Lead Well Pulse  www.bewellleadwellpulse.com


    WellBeing at Work, from Gallup:


    https://www.gallup.com/workplace/336935/wellbeing-at-work.aspx


     


    To discuss executive coaching, leadership development program design, and workshop facilitation, please visit:


    https://rise-leaders.com/contact-info/

    • 31 min
    #47 Shaken & Stirred | Calming a Frayed Nervous System

    #47 Shaken & Stirred | Calming a Frayed Nervous System

    We will all grapple with trauma in some form. If you haven’t experienced it yet personally, then as a leader, mentor, friend, or loved one, you’ll be with someone who has.

    Drawing from my own recent experience, I want to share what I’ve learned from an event that rattled my nervous system. We'll all get shaken by life, and whether it’s a heated argument, natural disaster, or a dog attack (like mine), it’s important to work through that experience so that unprocessed trauma doesn't get lodged in our system, only to make a surprise appearance when we least expect or want it. Not coping with trauma can have significant consequences.

    I'm sharing my own response to a recent experience. I’m not a trauma therapist or coach. I took on a few practices to move past a jarring event and as of now, they seem to be working. I do give coaching clients contemplative, grounding and journalizing practices like the ones I describe in this episode. I hope it helps you like it has for me.

    If you or someone you know have experience trauma, please reach out to a professional.

    Here are a few of my insights:



    Help often appears where you’re not looking
    During the attack, I thought I was powerless and alone. I looked in one direction for help but it came from another. We all have our blind spots, assumptions and ways of seeing reality. We often need others to help us past our limitations. I was not alone.


    Trust in Others Who Care About You
    It takes time for the fight-or-flight chemicals to leave our bodies.  Until then we may function 'just fine'.  Yet our decision-making post trauma is compromised because our nervous system takes a while to settle.  Having someone in your corner that sees reality more clearly and who is willing be straight with you is priceless. And you have to be open to listening.



    Make time to recuperate and reflect
    Take the time you need to heal and process the event. It’s likely you won't be on your game, so go light on work or take a complete break in order to give yourself the space to recover. While I didn't take days completely off, I went easy enough on myself to get my energy back and clear my head. Bodywork therapies like NetworkSpinal and Polarity Therapy helped me immensely, and journaling has been incredible as well.  Breathwork, mindfulness and movement were also part of my healing.  I also spent the evenings with a good novel!  

    For further exploration:
    Network Spinal – search for a practitioner near you
    Polarity Therapy:  https://polaritytherapy.org/
    Calm breath exercise – extended exhale https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aNXKjGFUlMs&t=5s
    Calm breath exercise – bubble/box breathing https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uxayUBd6T7M
    Third-person journaling https://goodmenproject.com/featured-content/dg/#:~:text=In%20the%20case%20of%20third,referring%20to%20ourselves%20by%20name.
    Telling Your Story May Be Good for Your Health https://h-i-v.net/spotlight/mental-health-month-2021

     
    To discuss executive coaching, leadership development program design, and workshop facilitation, please visit:
    https://rise-leaders.com/contact-info/

    • 19 min
    #46: For Good + For Profit: A Social Entrepreneur‘s Imperative

    #46: For Good + For Profit: A Social Entrepreneur‘s Imperative

    “We want to inspire a change in the social currency to be not one of status or prestige, but one around what it is that we're doing for others…we think a lot can happen from making small everyday changes or actions.” – Cory Ames, CEO of Grow Ensemble



    Using Business as a Force for Good
     


    Inspiring and generous. When I think of my interactions with CEO of Grow Ensemble Cory Ames, he embodies these descriptors with passion and authenticity. He is an exemplar of his goal to make sustainable business and sustainable living the norm.

    Prior to Growth Ensemble, at only 22, Cory was the CEO of a digital marketing agency. Next, he began consulting on all things digital marketing and SEO with the aim of using his skills for doing good. Now, as host of The Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation Podcast, he’s gleaned immeasurable wisdom from leaders in the social impact space. Such experience lends to his credibility and thoughtful dialogue.

    Drawing from roughly 180 interviews with these important players and his career, Cory takes us through:


    The distinction between social entrepreneurship versus Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and examples of brands in both domains

    What’s different about launching a company focused on doing good, plus helpful advice for those entering the space

    How he views his role as a leader, his personal philosophy and the impact he wishes to make

    And more to inspire you ...




    Social Entrepreneurship vs. CSR

    [08:08] “[Social entrepreneurs’] object and aim is to make some sort of meaningful impact, or some sort of meaningful change. So their business exists to ideally influence something environmental, or social…in contrast, Corporate Social Responsibility is an extension or the arm of a current business model.”




    Collaborate, Rather Than Compete, for the Common Good
    [27:49] “If you're in the space of wanting to use your business as a force for good to leave the world a better place, if someone else has a business whose objective is the same way, you're tackling the same goal; you're on the same team. So collaboration is a much more important priority than competition is in this space of sustainable business.”




    Leadership in a Sustainable Business

    [31:50] “I don't have all the answers, and I want to remain very curious and open to asking questions. That’s an expectation I want to set with anyone I work with - I'm more than okay being wrong and corrected and provided with the right information…it’s for the betterment of what we're doing, and, ultimately my betterment of understanding the world that we live in.”
     
    For further exploration:
    Guest links
    Cory Ames https://coryames.com/
    Grow Ensemble https://growensemble.com/
    Grow Ensemble Newsletter https://growensemble.com/newsletter/
    Grow Ensemble Podcast https://growensemble.com/podcast/
    LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/amescory/
    To join Grow Ensemble's community for social impact, visit: https://growensemble.com/membership

    To discuss executive coaching, leadership development program design, and workshop facilitation, please visit:
    https://rise-leaders.com/contact-info/

    • 42 min
    #45: 7 Elements of a Winning Culture: Foosball isn‘t one of them

    #45: 7 Elements of a Winning Culture: Foosball isn‘t one of them

    “There’s 10.1 million positions open [in the post-COVID workforce], there is this great resignation, a great reconsideration: What am I doing? Do I feel attached to my company? Do I feel like I have purpose?” – Mike Sullivan, CEO of the LOOMIS Agency

    The 7 Elements of Great Culture
    The pandemic changed the landscape of the working world as we know it. Team members’ priorities have shifted into focus, and in much of the workforce, there has been a mass exodus as they search for companies that align with their purpose or values.

    One element that can provide stability and longevity against this backdrop of rapid change is culture. As the CEO of The LOOMIS Agency, Mike Sullivan knows this firshand. Culture is a hallmark of strength in an organization that team members overwhelmingly respond well to. The proof is in the pudding: LOOMIS retained all team members during and after the pandemic.

    My previous discussion with Mike Sullivan established why a strong culture matters. Now we’re delving into what it looks like with his 7 elements of a great culture, pulled from his and Michael Tuggle’s book, The Voice of the Underdog: How Challenger Brands Achieve Success through Culture.

    Culture Starts with Safety
    [05:23] “Until people feel like they are safe, and they can bring their full selves to their employment situation, they're not going to be as concerned about tapping into a purpose at work, for example, which is the second [element of culture] – what is it that I'm here to do?”

    Don’t forget clients also attract (or detract from) security:

    [17:53] “One of the things that I focus on is, again, the kind of clients that you bring into an organization. What I was trying to do when I built my culture was create stability, first and foremost. So if a situation is stable, if your work environment is stable, now you feel safer, now you feel more connected, now you feel like you belong.”

    Connection is Founded on Communication
    [07:20] “Communication is leadership … if you’ll slow it down, and let folks know, ‘I don't have all the answers. Nobody seems to have all the answers. But give me your feedback, help me set our policy.’ And inviting them into that discussion, I think is really powerful.”

    Creativity Changes the Game
    [15:56] “There is no problem that can't be solved with creativity. But all the other things need to be in place to be on top of your game from a creative standpoint. You really do need to feel like you belong, you have a sense of purpose like, ‘This is going in the right direction. I feel good about the people I work with – now I’m able to bring my full self.’ And that's when creativity catches fire.”

    For further exploration:
     
    Mike Sullivan:  https://www.linkedin.com/in/mikesullivanatloomis/
    The LOOMIS Agency: https://theloomisagency.com
    The Voice of the Underdog: How Challenger Brands Create Distinction by thinking Culture First https://theloomisagency.com/challengerbook
    https://theloomisagency.com/blog/getting-company-culture-right-post-covid/
    The Voice of the Underdog Podcast:
    https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-voice-of-the-underdog/id1567247656
    HOW THE PANDEMIC NOW ENDS:
    https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2021/08/delta-has-changed-pandemic-endgame/619726/

    To discuss executive coaching, leadership development program design, and workshop facilitation, please visit:
    https://rise-leaders.com/contact-info/

    • 27 min
    #44 Want a Winning Brand? Build a Winning Culture with Mike Sullivan

    #44 Want a Winning Brand? Build a Winning Culture with Mike Sullivan

    “Ultimately, I decided I just wanted to create the kind of place that people want to work on Monday morning - they want to come, there’s no Sunday night dread. And again, it doesn't mean that it's perfect. But what it does mean is that we're focused on the right things.” - Mike Sullivan, CEO of The LOOMIS Agency


     


    A Strong Culture is a Competitive Advantage
    Mike Sullivan speaks with experience and authority. As CEO of the LOOMIS agency, he and his team have made it their mission to help challenger brands win more market share. And he has observed that no matter how great the branding is, if the culture stinks, the company will struggle.

    LOOMIS boasts half the turnover rate of other agencies. They themselves are a challenger brand that continues to crack the culture nut with multiple, year-over-year wins as a Best Place to Work. And as a result, they produce award-winning creative.

    But what is a challenger brand, and why is culture so important? I sit down with Mike and we discuss challenging the status quo, how culture and brand are inextricably linked, and how he and his team keep culture alive at LOOMIS. We also discuss brands that have successfully nurtured culture by including it in their purpose, values, and leadership competencies.



    What is a Challenger Brand?

    “Really challenger brands are those that are certainly challenged from a resource standpoint, but they're also oriented towards disruption. They’re oriented towards shaking up the marketplace, changing the rules, in a way that favors them… People within an organization need to think of and understand themselves as challengers.“



    Clients Impact Culture, Too

    [11:30] “Culture is going to reflect in large part by the company that you keep. If you’ve got difficult, challenging, unreasonable clients, then that’s going to infect your culture. It’s what you tolerate.…

    [12:30] "What I always look for is the way they [potential clients] treat [our] people and the way they treat their people - how they interact, how they engage.”



    Company Culture - Build an Extended Family

    [15:33] “The number-one word people use to describe rich, rewarding, and supportive cultures is family…they do become sort of an extension of your family…
    [15:14] “And I always think about that, you know, are these the kind of people that I want to put in relationship with our [team], because I think the world of our folks…who do you want to bring into your family, so to speak?”

    For further exploration:
     
    Mike Sullivan:  https://www.linkedin.com/in/mikesullivanatloomis/
    The LOOMIS Agency: https://theloomisagency.com
    The Voice of the Underdog: How Challenger Brands Create Distinction by thinking Culture First https://theloomisagency.com/challengerbook
    https://theloomisagency.com/getting-company-culture-right-post-covid


    To discuss executive coaching, leadership development program design, and workshop facilitation, please visit:
    https://rise-leaders.com/contact-info/

    • 26 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
17 Ratings

17 Ratings

napaulinelli ,

Insights wisdom and inspiration

LeeAnn curates content to transfer wisdom and inspiration. Guests share powerful practices and insights. Conversations are interesting and thoughtful. I find myself constantly checking for the next release. Well done!!

Michael Bez ,

Incredible voice and an insightful thought leader

Pragmatic and Insightful. Leannn is a natural and an incredible voice and thought leader.

Renee M, CEO, Wisdom Works ,

Inspiring!

LeeAnn has a knack for drawing out the best from the leaders she interviews. I leave her podcasts feeling inspired and hopeful about leaders everywhere who are choosing to use their power for good.

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