163 episodes

Risktory is a first of its kind podcast, dedicated to telling the story of risk through the lens of history.

From Napoleon in his first Italian campaign, to the ancient city of Pompeii, to Jack the Ripper, risk management has always had a place in helping humans to both guard against existential threat, but to also grasp and exploit exquisite opportunity.

Think risk is boring? Let Risktory blow your mind. New episodes are released every Monday.

Risktory: The Story of Risk Jacinthe A Galpin

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.7, 29 Ratings

Risktory is a first of its kind podcast, dedicated to telling the story of risk through the lens of history.

From Napoleon in his first Italian campaign, to the ancient city of Pompeii, to Jack the Ripper, risk management has always had a place in helping humans to both guard against existential threat, but to also grasp and exploit exquisite opportunity.

Think risk is boring? Let Risktory blow your mind. New episodes are released every Monday.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
29 Ratings

29 Ratings

GPC iPad ,

Excellent podcast

I’m a huge fan and follower of The Risktory Podcast. I’ve been working in critical infrastructure protection for 28 years. The content, preparation and delivery of the podcasts are well executed, insightful and enjoyable. Jacinthe A. Galpin does a wonderful job. I’ve listened to every Risktory podcast and look forward to each new episode with eager anticipation. I strongly recommend this podcast to anyone interested in history and the dark art of risk management.

Starfaced5 ,

Incredibly good

Love these podcasts. The range of information is incredible, and it’s one podcast whose episodes I must hear more than once, and share with others. Thrilled to see the segment about Daisy Bates. Not enough is known about her, this was a thrill to find, so aptly done. Keep it up, each segment is sublime. Here is source information made to come alive.

Laura Krander ,

Great podcast, but some inaccuracies

I really love this podcast. I can hear about historical events and influential individuals and consider the application of risk management all in an easily digestible format. Sometimes there are some details that are inaccurate. I can let that go, because each episode is more of a synopsis and autopsy of risk management than a complete blow-by-blow of events.

However, the episode exploring the financial crisis of 2008 is completely wrong and ignores mounds of research and facts. I understand the creator’s political and economic perspectives are different than mine, and in many ways that’s a positive thing. But stating that the housing crisis was caused by too much government intervention and the overburdening regulatory requirements of the Community Reinvestment Act and continuing the synopsis through that lens undermines the evidence and reality. The crisis was caused by incredible greed, irresponsibility, and a lack of transparency by huge parts of the banking and finance sector. All things that government regulation helps to prevent. Which is exactly why the vast majority of that sector want less regulation. And why less regulation leads to crisis like we had in 2008 (Repeal of Glass-Steagall anyone?).

This story about the CRA being the cause of the crisis defies logic and direct evidence to the contrary. Doing even the smallest bit of research into the cause of the financial crisis and reading the language of the act itself dismisses this theory entirely. It is propaganda disseminated by those who caused the problem to begin with, their lobbyists, the politicians who benefit, and those who would call Ayn Rand their hero. So people who think unfettered greed and selfishness, particularly at the expense of others, is not only acceptable but encouraged. Yeah, I don’t buy that.

Why Jacinthe A Galpin is able to identify these things in the episode on the Dotcom crash yet not here is beyond me. All that said, this is still an excellent podcast that I’m not going turn off just because I disagree with one episode. It’s too much fun to listen to and I get so much out of it that I couldn’t turn it off if I wanted to.

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