1 hr 1 min

S1E7 - Relational Identity Curiously Strong Pod

    • Society & Culture

How has the experience of leaving evangelicalism affected the relationships we have with the people around us? We need to be shifting away from an “us” versus “them” mentality because so much of conservative Christianity is defining yourself by whether you are in the in group or out group. Whether you are bad or good, right or wrong, saved or lost. So we don’t talk about camps anymore, everyone is an individual and nuanced. Christianity had taught us that everyone is our responsibility because we put them on a path to either heaven or hell purely based on our interactions creating an impossible burden and crushing weight of someone’s salvation. At the same time we were taught that it’s up to the Holy Spirit in the end and it all results in cognitive dissonance. But now we can say: “I can remember someone’s humanity but I don’t have to interact with it. Not everyone is my responsibility.” We also tackle topics like forced vulnerability in small/community groups causing psychological harm and how much we dislike it when people tell us they are going to pray for us. “You had to talk to god about me?” Some questions we consider are: How do we balance real vulnerability and sharing experiences while not having to justify and defend our life choices? How do we say no without having to explain ourselves and how are our boundaries with other people now that god is out of the picture?

How has the experience of leaving evangelicalism affected the relationships we have with the people around us? We need to be shifting away from an “us” versus “them” mentality because so much of conservative Christianity is defining yourself by whether you are in the in group or out group. Whether you are bad or good, right or wrong, saved or lost. So we don’t talk about camps anymore, everyone is an individual and nuanced. Christianity had taught us that everyone is our responsibility because we put them on a path to either heaven or hell purely based on our interactions creating an impossible burden and crushing weight of someone’s salvation. At the same time we were taught that it’s up to the Holy Spirit in the end and it all results in cognitive dissonance. But now we can say: “I can remember someone’s humanity but I don’t have to interact with it. Not everyone is my responsibility.” We also tackle topics like forced vulnerability in small/community groups causing psychological harm and how much we dislike it when people tell us they are going to pray for us. “You had to talk to god about me?” Some questions we consider are: How do we balance real vulnerability and sharing experiences while not having to justify and defend our life choices? How do we say no without having to explain ourselves and how are our boundaries with other people now that god is out of the picture?

1 hr 1 min

Top Podcasts In Society & Culture