300 episodes

Weekly podcasts from Science Magazine, the world's leading journal of original scientific research, global news, and commentary.

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    • Science
    • 4.3 • 538 Ratings

Weekly podcasts from Science Magazine, the world's leading journal of original scientific research, global news, and commentary.

    Making sure American Indian COVID-19 cases are counted, and feeding a hungry heart

    Making sure American Indian COVID-19 cases are counted, and feeding a hungry heart

    First up, host Meagan Cantwell speaks with Abigail Echo-Hawk, director of the Urban Indian Health Institute and chief research officer for the Seattle Indian Health Board. Echo-Hawk shares what inspired her journey in public health and explains the repercussions of excluding native people from health data. This story was originally reported by Lizzie Wade, who profiled Echo-Hawk as part of Science’s “voices of the pandemic” series.

    Next, host Sarah Crespi interviews Danielle Murashige, a Ph.D. student at the University of Pennsylvania, about her Science paper that attempts to quantify how much fuel a healthy heart needs.

    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.

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    Download a transcript (PDF).

    • 21 min
    Visiting a once-watery asteroid, and how buzzing the tongue can treat tinnitus

    Visiting a once-watery asteroid, and how buzzing the tongue can treat tinnitus

    First up, Staff Writer Paul Voosen talks with host Sarah Crespi about the Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, Security, Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx) mission to the asteroid Bennu. After OSIRIS-REx’s up-close surveys of the surface revealed fewer likely touchdown points than expected, its sampling mission has been rejiggered. Paul talks about the prospects for a safe sampling in mid-October and what we might learn when the craft returns to Earth in 2023.

    Sarah also talks with Hubert Lim, from the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, and Neuromod Devices Limited, about his Science Translational Medicine paper on a new treatment for tinnitus. The team showed that bimodal stimulation—playing sounds in the ear and buzzes on the tongue—was able to change the brain and turn down the tinnitus in a large clinical trial.

    Extra audio credits: Tinnitus sound samples courtesy of the American Tinnitus Association. Treatment samples courtesy of Neuromod Devices Ltd.

    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.

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    About the Science Podcast

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    • 23 min
    FDA clinical trial failures, and an AI that can beat curling’s top players

    FDA clinical trial failures, and an AI that can beat curling’s top players

    Investigative journalist Charles Piller joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss his latest Science exclusive: a deep dive into the Food and Drug Administration’s protection of human subjects in clinical trials. Based on months of data analysis and interviews, he uncovered long-term failures in safety enforcement in clinical trials and potential problems with trial data used to make decisions about drug and device approvals.

    Sarah also talks with Klaus-Robert Müller, a professor of machine learning at the Technical University of Berlin, about an artificial intelligence (AI) trained in the sport of curling—often described as a cross between bowling and chess. Although AI has succeeded in chess, Go, and poker, the constantly changing environment of curling is far harder for a nonhuman mind to adapt to. But AIs were the big winners in competitions with top human players, Müller and colleagues report this week in Science Robotics.

    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.

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    • 28 min
    How Neanderthals got human Y chromosomes, and the earliest human footprints in Arabia

    How Neanderthals got human Y chromosomes, and the earliest human footprints in Arabia

    Contributing Correspondent Ann Gibbons talks with host Sarah Crespi about a series of 120,000-year-old human footprints found alongside prints from animals like asses, elephants, and camels in a dried-up lake on the Arabian Peninsula. These are the earliest human footprints found so far in Arabia and may help researchers better understand the history of early hominin migrations out of Africa.

    Continuing on the history of humanity theme, Sarah talks with Janet Kelso of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, about her team’s efforts to fish the elusive Y chromosome out of Neanderthal and Denisovan DNA. It turns out Y chromosomes tell a different story about our past interbreeding with Neanderthals than previous tales told by the rest of the genome. Read a related Insight article.

    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.

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    • 21 min
    Performing magic for animals, and why the pandemic is pushing people out of prisons

    Performing magic for animals, and why the pandemic is pushing people out of prisons

    Staff Writer Kelly Servick joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss how jail and prison populations in the United States have dropped in the face of coronavirus and what kinds of scientific questions about public health and criminal justice are arising as a result.

    Also this week, Elias García-Pelegrín, a Ph.D. student at the University of Cambridge, talks with Sarah about his article on watching animals watch magic tricks. Do animals fall for the same illusions we do? What does it say about the way their minds work?

    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.

    Listen to previous podcasts.

    About the Science Podcast

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    • 23 min
    Alien hunters get a funding boost, and checking on the link between chromosome ‘caps’ and aging

    Alien hunters get a funding boost, and checking on the link between chromosome ‘caps’ and aging

    First up this week, Senior Correspondent Daniel Clery talks with host Sarah Crespi about how Breakthrough Listen—a privately funded initiative that aims to spend $100 million over 10 years to find extraterrestrial intelligent life—has changed the hunt for alien intelligence. 

    And as part of a special issue on the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project, Brandon Pierce, a professor in the Departments of Public Health Sciences and Human Genetics at the University of Chicago, joins Sarah to discuss his group’s work on variation in the protective caps at the end of our chromosomes. The gradual shortening of these caps, also known as telomeres, has been associated with aging.

    Read more from the GTEx special issue.

    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.

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    About the Science Podcast

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    [Image: V. Altounian/Science; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

    • 24 min

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5
538 Ratings

538 Ratings

resworb2091802 ,

Aspirin

I hope they take time to talk about the data for aspirin and wether it really helps
Or hurts populations where it is used prophylactially in assymptomatic people despite being sponsors by Bauer aspirin !!!!!

sarahgoldy ,

In depth and fascinating science news

This is a great podcast that goes in depth into science and explains stories in detail. Topics include covid19 and also lots of other interesting areas from ecology to anorexia, ancient societies and neurology.

alisa wells ,

Great podcast!

Super informative!

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