100 episodes

Weekly podcasts from Science Magazine, the world's leading journal of original scientific research, global news, and commentary.

Science Magazine Podcast Science Magazine

    • Science
    • 4.3 • 657 Ratings

Weekly podcasts from Science Magazine, the world's leading journal of original scientific research, global news, and commentary.

    Using waste to fuel airplanes, nature-based climate solutions, and a book on Indigenous conservation

    Using waste to fuel airplanes, nature-based climate solutions, and a book on Indigenous conservation

    On this week’s show: Whether biofuels for planes will become a reality, mitigating climate change by working with nature, and the second installment of our book series on the science of food and agriculture

    First this week, Science Staff Writer Robert F. Service talks with producer Meagan Cantwell about sustainable aviation fuel, a story included in Science’s special issue on climate change. Researchers have been able to develop this green gas from materials such as municipal garbage and corn stalks. Will it power air travel in the future?

    Also in the special issue this week, Nathalie Seddon, a professor of biodiversity at the University of Oxford, chats with host Sarah Crespi about the value of working with nature to support the biodiversity and resilience of our ecosystems. Seddon emphasizes that nature-based solutions alone cannot stop climate change—technological approaches and behavioral changes will also need to be implemented.

    Finally, we have the second installment of our series of author interviews on the science of food and agriculture. Host and science journalist Angela Saini talks to Jessica Hernandez, an Indigenous environmental scientist and author of Fresh Banana Leaves: Healing Indigenous Landscapes Through Indigenous Science. Hernandez’s book explores the failures of Western conservationism—and what we can learn about land management from Indigenous people.

    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.

    [Image: USDA NCRS Texas; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

    [alt: cows in a forest]

    Authors: Meagan Cantwell; Robert Service, Sarah Crespi, Angela Saini

    Episode page: https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/science.add6320

    About the Science Podcast: https://www.science.org/content/page/about-science-podcast

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 42 min
    A look at Long Covid, and why researchers and police shouldn’t use the same DNA kits

    A look at Long Covid, and why researchers and police shouldn’t use the same DNA kits

    On this week’s show: Tracing the roots of Long Covid, and an argument against using the same DNA markers for suspects in law enforcement and in research labs for cell lines

    Two years into the pandemic, we’re still uncertain about the impact of Long Covid on the world—and up to 20% of COVID-19 patients might be at risk. First on the podcast this week, Staff Writer Jennifer Couzin-Frankel joins host Sarah Crespi to share a snapshot of the current state of Long Covid research, particularly what researchers think are likely causes.

    Also this week, Debra Mathews, assistant director for science programs in the Berman Institute of Bioethics and associate professor of genetic medicine at Johns Hopkins University, talks with Sarah about why everyone using the same DNA kits—from FBI to Interpol to research labs—is a bad idea. 

    Finally, in a sponsored segment from the Science/AAAS Custom Publishing Office, Sean Sanders, director and senior editor for custom publishing, interviews Bobby Soni, chief business officer at the BioInnovation Institute (BII), about what steps scientists can take to successfully commercialize their ideas. This segment is sponsored by BII.

    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.

    [Image: A. Mastin/Science; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

    [alt: illustration of potential causes for Long Covid ]

    Authors: Sarah Crespi; Jennifer Couzin-Frankel

    Episode page: https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/science.add4887

    About the Science Podcast: https://www.science.org/content/page/about-science-podcast 

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 38 min
    Saving the Spix’s macaw, and protecting the energy grid

    Saving the Spix’s macaw, and protecting the energy grid

    Two decades after it disappeared in nature, the stunning blue Spix’s macaw will be reintroduced to its forest home, and lessons learned from Texas’s major power crisis in 2021

    The Spix’s macaw was first described in scientific literature in 1819—200 years later it was basically poached to extinction in the wild. Now, collectors and conservationists are working together to reintroduce captive-bred birds into their natural habitat in northeastern Brazil. Contributing Correspondent Kai Kupferschmidt discusses the recovery of this highly coveted and endangered parrot with host Sarah Crespi.

    Also this week, in an interview from the AAAS annual meeting, Meagan Cantwell talks with Varun Rai, Walt and Elspth Rostow professor in the LBJ School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas, Austin, about how to prepare energy grids to weather extreme events and climate change.

    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.

    [Image: PATRICK PLEUL/PICTURE ALLIANCE VIA GETTY IMAGES; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

    [alt: two blue Spix’s macaws with podcast symbol overlay]

    Authors: Sarah Crespi; Kai Kupferschmidt; Meagan Cantwell

    Episode page: https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/science.add3733

    About the Science Podcast: https://www.science.org/content/page/about-science-podcast

     

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    • 29 min
    The historic Maya’s sophisticated stargazing knowledge, and whether there is a cost to natural cloning

    The historic Maya’s sophisticated stargazing knowledge, and whether there is a cost to natural cloning

    On this week’s show: Exploring the historic Maya’s astronomical knowledge and how grasshoppers clone themselves without decreasing their fitness

    First this week, Science contributing correspondent Joshua Sokol talks with producer Meagan Cantwell about the historic Maya’s sophisticated astronomical knowledge. In recent decades, researchers have set out to understand how city structures relate to astronomical phenomena and decipher ancient texts. Now, collaboration between Western scholars and living Indigenous people hopes to further illuminate the field.

    Also this week, Mike Kearney, a professor at the school of biosciences at the University of Melbourne, chats with host Sarah Crespi about a species of grasshopper that can reproduce asexually. After studying the insect’s genetics, Kearney and his group didn’t find harmful mutations—or traits that made the grasshopper better adapted to its environment than the two species of grasshopper it hybridized from. Kearney and his team suggest this way of reproducing might not be rare because it’s harmful, but because most animal have safeguards in place to prevent asexual reproduction from arising.

    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.

    [Image: Sergio Montúfar/pinceladasnocturnas.com—Estrellas Ancestrales “Astronomy in the Maya Worldview”; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

    Authors: Meagan Cantwell; Joshua Sokol; Sarah Crespi

    Episode page: https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/science.add3058 

    About the Science Podcast: https://www.science.org/content/page/about-science-podcast

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 26 min
    Saying farewell to Insight, connecting the microbiome and the brain, and a book on agriculture in Africa

    Saying farewell to Insight, connecting the microbiome and the brain, and a book on agriculture in Africa

    What we learned from a seismometer on Mars, why it’s so difficult to understand the relationship between our microbes and our brains, and the first in our series of books on the science of food and agriculture

    First up this week, freelance space journalist Jonathan O’Callaghan  joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss the retirement of NASA’s Mars InSight lander. After almost 4 years of measuring quakes on the surface of the Red Planet, the  lander’s solar panels are getting too dusty to continue providing power. O'Callaghan  and Crespi look back at the insights  that InSight has given us about Mars’s interior, and they talk about where else in the Solar System it might make sense to place a seismometer.

    Also this week, we have a special issue on the body’s microbiome beyond the gut. As part of the special issue, John Cryan, principal investigator at APC Microbiome Ireland, University College Cork, wrote a commentary piece  on tightening the connections research has made between microbes and the brain—the steps needed to go from seeing connections to understanding how the microbiome might be tweaked to change what’s happening in the brain.

    Finally this week, we have the first installment of our series of author interviews  on the science of food and agriculture. In this inaugural segment, host and science journalist Angela Saini talks to Ousmane Badiane, an expert on agricultural policy and development in Africa, and a co-author of Food For All In Africa: Sustainable Intensification for African Farmers, a 2019 book looking at the possibilities and reality of sustainable intensive farming in Africa.

    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.

    [Illustration: Hannah Agosta; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

    [alt: overlapping drawings of microbial populations]

    Authors: Sarah Crespi; Jonathan O’Callaghan; Angela Saini

    Episode page: https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/science.10.1126/science.add1406

    About the Science Podcast: https://www.science.org/content/page/about-science-podcast

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 37 min
    Seeing the Milky Way’s central black hole, and calling dolphins by their names

    Seeing the Milky Way’s central black hole, and calling dolphins by their names

    On this week’s show: The shadow of Milky Way’s giant black hole has been seen for the first time, and bottlenose dolphins recognize each other by signature whistles—and tastes 

    It’s been a few years since the first image of a black hole was published—that of the supermassive black hole at the center of the M87 galaxy came about in 2019. Now, we have a similar image of the black hole at the center of the Milky Way—our very own galaxy. Staff Writer Daniel Clery joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss why these images look so much alike, even though M87’s black hole is 1600 times larger than ours. We also discuss what’s next for the telescope that captured these shots.

    Also this week, we take to the seas. Bottlenose dolphins are known to have a “signature whistle” they use to announce their identity to other dolphins. This week in Science Advances, Jason Bruck and colleagues write about how they may also recognize other dolphins through another sense: taste. Jason, an assistant professor in the department of biology at Stephen F. Austin State University, talks with Sarah about what this means for dolphin minds.

    In a sponsored segment from the Science/AAAS Custom Publishing Office, Sean Sanders, director and senior editor, interviews Gary Michelson, founder and co-chair of Michelson Philanthropies, about the importance of supporting research in the field of immunology—and where that support should be directed. This segment is sponsored by Michelson Philanthropies.

    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.

    [Image: Dolphin Quest ; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

    [alt: bottlenose dolphin peeking its head out of the water with podcast symbol overlay]

    Authors: Sarah Crespi; Daniel Clery

    Episode page: https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/science.add0515

    About the Science Podcast: https://www.science.org/content/page/about-science-podcast

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 41 min

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5
657 Ratings

657 Ratings

Abu Shibshib ,

One Topic

It might be worthwhile to focus on just one topic per episode. Sometimes I find myself interested in only 1 out of three of the topics discussed and therefore don’t listen to the episode

The Devonian Kid ,

Changes not for the better.

I have changed my review from 5 to 2 stars because of two unfortunate changes. Rather than interviewing the authors of original papers, the host frequently just interviews another Science reporter. This produces a “scripted” effect and the enthusiasm of the real scientist-authors is missing. The podcast has also become very heavily committed to the current “woke” fashion, further reducing scientific content and approach. Really disappointing.

B_squared ,

Nonfunctional Links in Most Recent Episode

Just a heads up! Love the pod

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