27 episodes

The SDBN Buzz is intended to connect scientists and entrepreneurs in the San Diego Biotech community while showing the world the exciting work happening here.

SDBN BUZZ Chris Conner

    • Entrepreneurship
    • 5.0, 1 Rating

The SDBN Buzz is intended to connect scientists and entrepreneurs in the San Diego Biotech community while showing the world the exciting work happening here.

    How San Diego Became an Innovation Hub

    How San Diego Became an Innovation Hub

    You already know San Diego is a fantastic place for science and technology.  But maybe you think that happened by accident or just because the weather is spectacular. The climate does play a part, but there was also some vision and effort that made it what it is today.
    Mary Walshok is the Dean of the UCSD Extension and a fantastic storyteller who has studied the history of San Diego as a sociologist, exploring the factors that shaped the city along the way to becoming what it is today.
    It turns out, San Diego is a small midwestern town on the edge of the Pacific Ocean.
    In this interview, she describes the people who migrated from the midwest for health reasons and how they influenced the culture that would eventually evolve.
    World War One had a major impact as well. Science and technology were becoming very important for the region and the country. The early residents weren't keen on industrial manufacturing, though and had a different vision for growth.
    Mary talks about the leaders who convinced the Navy to put a base in San Diego and others who later persuaded the University of California to put a campus nearby. Of course, science played a major role throughout.
    Finally she explains how San Diego has avoided becoming a "company town" and why what a town really wants isn't companies, but rather talent.
    This isn't the usual science or business interview, but it explains the success of both in San Diego. It is a fascinating story.
    Invention and Reinvention: The Evolution of San Diego’s Innovation Economy
    SDBN Virtual Speed Networking Event Aug 31.
     

    • 43 min
    The Why and the How of Science on the International Space Station

    The Why and the How of Science on the International Space Station

    There is more life science research going on in space than you probably imagined. And amazingly, experiments including microscopy, are controlled from the ground.
    It's a long way from the days of shuttle astronauts having to carryout protocols in a weightless environment.

    In this episode, Jana Stoudemire explained to me the mission of Space Tango, the types of science that can benefit from zero gravity and how experiments get done remotely. Spoiler: If you can do it on a bench here on earth, that's where you should do it.
    While it takes a lot of effort to plan and conduct these experiments, the good news is that NASA gives them a free ride to the ISS for now.

    Events mentioned in this episode:
    July 31 Reimagine BioPharma: Ask the Expert and Speed Networking
    Aug 13 SDBN Speed Networking

    • 34 min
    How Stem Cells Might Rescue the Most Endangered Species

    How Stem Cells Might Rescue the Most Endangered Species

    There are 2 Northern White Rhinos left in the world. Both female.
    Yet because someone thought to preserve tissue samples back in the 1970s without any idea of the possibilities, there might be a chance to bring this species back.
    Marisa Korody is a conservation geneticist at the San Siego Zoo in the Institute for Conservation Research.
    She describes the challenges of producing inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and all the steps from there to someday producing the next generation of northern white rhinos.
    Spoiler: It takes a lot of work to do this and there has been some luck involved as well. Rhinos aren't exactly a common experimental animal. For example, a team at the zoo has trained southern white rhinos to stand for blood draws and other procedures that may allow them to eventually serve as surrogates. (The two female northern white rhinos can't carry embryos.)
    We also talked a bit about Marisa's career. It's a big move from study sparrows to rhinos. Probably bigger than Salmonella genetics to podcasting ;-)
    Thinking about a podcast for your business? Schedule a 15 minute chat.

    • 29 min
    The How and the Why of Inducible Pluripotent Stem Cells

    The How and the Why of Inducible Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are cultured cells with the ability to become any cell type present in the species from which it came. Jeanne Loring (Professsor Emeritus at Scripps Research and the Chief Scientific Officer at Aspen Biosciences) is an expert in this area.
    In this episode, she described how iPSCs are made and what they can be used for. Spoiler alert: skin cells and lots of important stuff.
    One example is to create dopamine neurons that may be used as a treatment for Parkinson's disea

    • 27 min
    Repositioning Drugs as Potential Therapies for COVID-19

    Repositioning Drugs as Potential Therapies for COVID-19

    In this episode we visit the front lines of science. We're all aware of the health care workers on the front lines of treatment, but what is it like to do research on the novel coronavirus? And what are the strategies?
    Drs. Sumit Chanda and Laura Martin-Sancho describe for me their efforts at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute. The strategy is to screen thousands of drugs that have already been through clinical trials with known safety profiles to see which ones may interfere with viral repl

    • 31 min
    Using Biology as Technology to Stream Data

    Using Biology as Technology to Stream Data

    Michael Heltzen is the CEO of Cardea Bio. He envisions a time when biology is part of the technology. What exactly does that mean?
    We currently use aspects of biology to observe or manipulate living systems. But often we are measuring at a moment in time. His vision is to use biological molecules as sensors to continuously stream information through electrical signals much as a transistor works in a computer, communicating on and off states of binding interactions for example.
    As an analogy, it would be dif

    • 34 min

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Ed*188• ,

Good Conversation for Biotech Humane Pros

Thank you for this podcast, Edwin Najera, Biological Physics, St. Mary’s University (TX.) and U. of Michigan (MI.).

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