54 episodes

A selection of episodes from the program that questions everything... except your intelligence.

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    • Education
    • 5.0 • 3 Ratings

A selection of episodes from the program that questions everything... except your intelligence.

    This Week: The Art of Nonviolence

    This Week: The Art of Nonviolence

    More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/art-non-violence.

    We all hope for peace. Yet in the face of violence, it often seems the only recourse is more violence. Advocates of non-violence claim it’s not necessary to respond to war in kind, and that responding violently, even in self-defense, just perpetuates the cycle of violence. So how can we practice non-violence under the direct threat of violence? Can non-violent acts be spread to stop aggression and war? And are there times when violence is, in fact, necessary? John and Ken keep the peace with Judith Butler from UC Berkeley, author of "The Force of Non-Violence: An Ethico-Political Bind."

    • 51 min
    Could Robot Be Persons?

    Could Robot Be Persons?

    More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/could-robots-be-persons.

    As we approach the advent of autonomous robots, we must decide how we will determine culpability for their actions. Some propose creating a new legal category of “electronic personhood” for any sufficiently advanced robot that can learn and make decisions by itself. But do we really want to assign artificial intelligence legal—or moral—rights and responsibilities? Would it be ethical to produce and sell something with the status of a person in the first place? Does designing machines that look and act like humans lead us to misplace our empathy? Or should we be kind to robots lest we become unkind to our fellow human beings? Josh and Ray do the robot with Joanna Bryson, Professor of Ethics and Technology at the Hertie School of Governance, and author of "The Artificial Intelligence of the Ethics of Artificial Intelligence: An Introductory Overview for Law and Regulation."

    • 50 min
    What Can Virtual Reality (Actually) Do?

    What Can Virtual Reality (Actually) Do?

    More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/what-can-virtual-reality-actually-do.

    VR transports users into all kinds of different realities, some modeled on the real world, others completely invented. Though still in its infancy, the technology has become so sophisticated, it can trick the brain into treating the virtual experience as real and unmediated. So what is the most prudent way to employ this cutting edge technology going forward? Could VR help solve real world problems, like implicit bias or the climate crisis? And as the technology becomes more widely available, are there potential dangers we ought to be seriously thinking about? Josh and Ray strap on their headsets with Jeremy Bailenson, Director of the Virtual Human Interaction Lab at Stanford, and author of "Experience on Demand: What Virtual Reality Is, How It Works, and What It Can Do."

    • 51 min
    The Social Lives of Robots

    The Social Lives of Robots

    More at https://www.philosophytalk.org/shows/social-lives-robots.

    Machines might surpass humans in terms of computational intelligence, but when it comes to social intelligence, they’re not very sophisticated. They have difficulty reading subtle cues—like body language, eye gaze, or facial expression—that we pick up on automatically. As robots integrate more and more into human life, how will they figure out the codes for appropriate behavior in different contexts? Can social intelligence be learned via an algorithm? And how do we design socially smart robots to be of special assistance to children, older adults, and people with disabilities? Josh and Ray read the room with Elaine Short from Tufts University, co-author of more than 20 papers on human-robot interaction, including "Robot moderation of a collaborative game: Towards socially assistive robotics in group interactions."

    • 51 min
    Time for Summer Reading

    Time for Summer Reading

    More at www.philosophytalk.org/shows/time-summer-reading.

    When John and Ken began shopping around their idea for a philosophy-on-the-radio show nearly 20 years ago, many believed it would never work, let alone stay on the air. Nearly two decades later, the program that questions everything (except your intelligence) has hit 500 episodes -- just in time for current co-hosts Josh and Ray to spend our annual summer reading show thinking about time and books about time:

    • Physicist Carlo Rovelli, author of "The Order of Time"
    • Political scientist Elizabeth Cohen, author of "The Political Value of Time"
    • Poet and essayist Jane Hirshfield, author of "Ledger"

    Plus philosopher Jorah Dannenberg on Ted Chiang's "Story of Your Life."

    • 51 min
    Ken Taylor Tribute

    Ken Taylor Tribute

    More at www.philosophytalk.org/shows/ken-taylor-tribute.

    The Philosophy Talk team is deeply saddened by Ken Taylor's untimely passing this month. Ken was the show's co-founder, longtime co-host, chief cheerleader, and guiding light. In this special episode, co-hosts Josh Landy and Debra Satz, along with host emeritus and co-creator John Perry, remember their colleague and friend. They also hear from past guests, former students, and others touched by Ken's life and work.

    We're also touched and honored that Ken's family has requested that donations in his memory be made to www.philosophytalk.org/donate.

    • 52 min

Customer Reviews

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3 Ratings

3 Ratings

Blah0707 ,

Much Needed!!

This show really makes you think in the best of ways. Thank you to all and RIP to Professor Taylor.

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