58 episodes

The Seventh Row Podcast is a weekly podcast in which we compare and contrast films to discover new insights and context for (mostly foreign and independent) films both new and old. Our panel always features at least 50% women, and is a combination of critics, film lovers, and academics.

Our featured content are our podcast seasons. We published a season on Women at Cannes in May 2022. Our next season is coming 2023. In the meantime, we will be intermittently publishing episodes on new releases, most of which will be members only.

All episodes more than six months old will be only available to our members. As a member, you’ll receive a personalized premium feed of all of our episodes, and you can still listen to it from your favourite podcatcher.

To become a member, visit http://seventh-row.com/join

Seventh Row podcast Seventh Row

    • TV & Film
    • 4.9 • 21 Ratings

The Seventh Row Podcast is a weekly podcast in which we compare and contrast films to discover new insights and context for (mostly foreign and independent) films both new and old. Our panel always features at least 50% women, and is a combination of critics, film lovers, and academics.

Our featured content are our podcast seasons. We published a season on Women at Cannes in May 2022. Our next season is coming 2023. In the meantime, we will be intermittently publishing episodes on new releases, most of which will be members only.

All episodes more than six months old will be only available to our members. As a member, you’ll receive a personalized premium feed of all of our episodes, and you can still listen to it from your favourite podcatcher.

To become a member, visit http://seventh-row.com/join

    130: Jerzy Skolimowski's Eo (Excerpt)

    130: Jerzy Skolimowski's Eo (Excerpt)

    This is an excerpt of a members only episode. To listen to the full episode, become a member at http://seventh-row.com/join
    One of the best movies of 2022, Jerzy Skolimowski's visually and aurally inventive Eo, is now in cinemas for a limited time. The film is about injustice in the animal world seen through the eyes of a donkey. It's a great big screen experience (for sound and image) so we're going deep on the film this week. Editor-in-Chief Alex Heeney and Executive Editor Orla Smith are joined by Associate Editor Dr. Brett "Empathy" Pardy. 
    About the excerpt
    In this excerpt, we discuss whether Eo is presented as an "exceptional" animal/donkey in the film. Many films about animals depict them as exceptional, like Air Bud the golden retriever who can play basketball or Okja the superpig. In many ways, Skolimowski's film bucks convention here by making Eo a fairly normal donkey whose experiences (and the way he's depicted) render him a subject of interest rather than because he's a particularly special donkey. 
    We ask, why do we care about animals on screen (in general) and why do we care about Eo? Does a home exist for a donkey like Eo?
    Become a member to listen to the rest of the discussion, which includes:
    In the full episode, we go even deeper on how the film creates empathy for a donkey and give a donkey the appearance of a full emotional inner-life. We also compare Eo to other recent films about (or featuring) animals — including White God, Lean on Pete, Cow, and Gunda — to help us understand how empathy is usually extended toward on-screen animals. Finally, we discuss how some of the best politically conscious films being made today, with youthful exuberance, are coming from directors over 70.
     
    01:51 Why are we talking about Eo?
    09:18 Placing Eo within the canon of donkey stories
    13:53 Exceptional donkeys (this section is the only one available free)
    32:00 Anthropomorphising animals 
    46:56 An older generation of political filmmakers
    Show Notes Become a member for access to all of our upcoming episodes Listen to our previous podcast season on Women at Cannes Read Alex Heeney's review of Eo Get your copy of our ebook on Lean on Pete, a film about an unexceptional horse Read Alex Heeney's White God interview with the film's director and animal trainer Get your copy of our ebook Road to nowhere: Kelly Reichardt's broken American dreams. It features an interview with the First Cow and Lean on Pete animal trainer. Watch the 2009 Sam Mendes Charlie Rose interview referenced in the episode. He discusses the differences between directing film and theatre Related episodes Ep. 11: Mike Leigh's Peterloo (Free) - on the film and what we learned about Leigh's process and the film from writing the book Peterloo in process: A Mike Leigh collaboration Ep. 32: Sorry We Missed You and Peterloo (Members only) - we discuss creating empathy for characters navigating an unjust world Ep 93: The films of Agnieszka Holland (Members Only) - we discuss Europa Europa, Washington Square, and Charlatan and how Holland depicts life under totalitarian states (which has similarities what Eo experiences as a lower class donkey) Ep. 104: Agnieszka Holland on directing (Members Only) - an in-depth interview with the director about bucking convention from early on in her career, and how she continues to do so now Ep. 7: Andrew Haigh's Lean on Pete (Free) - we discuss the film and its depiction of an unexceptional horse, as well as insights gleaned from our ebook on the film (Lean on Pete: A Special Issue), including how it was made Where to find us
    Follow Seventh Row on Twitter and Instagram @SeventhRow.
    Follow Alex Heeney @bwestcineaste, Orla Smith @orlamango, and Dr. Brett Pardy @DrAntiqueiPod on Twitter. 

    • 20 min
    Highlights from the fall film film festivals (Excerpt of Members Only Episode)

    Highlights from the fall film film festivals (Excerpt of Members Only Episode)

    This is an excerpt of a members only episode. To listen to the full episode, become a member at http://seventh-row.com/join
    Editor-in-Chief Alex Heeney and Executive Editor Orla Smith discuss the highlights of the fall film festival circuit, the new and troubling dominance of Netflix (and other streamers') films, and exciting (or not-so-exciting) first features. We discuss favourites like The Eternal Daughter, Saint Omer, Other People's Children — many of which will get a full-length episode of their own in the coming months. We also discuss some of the biggest disappointments. Orla shares her experience at the London Film Festival. Alex shares her experience attending the Toronto International Film Festival.
    Follow Seventh Row on Twitter and Instagram @SeventhRow. Follow Alex Heeney @bwestcineaste and Orla Smith @orlamango on Twitter. 
    On this episode excerpt:
    00:00-5:24 - Intro to the episode and the festivals we've covered 5:24-18:55 Rebecca Zlotowski's Other People's Children and a new film grammar for women as multitaskers in Other People's Children, Mia Hansen-Løve's One Fine Morning, and Joanna Hogg's The Eternal Daughter  FREE EXCERPT ENDS HERE Become a member to listen to the rest o the discussion, which includes:
    18:55-20:55 How many films we saw, and some of the downsides 20:55-25:45 Orla's favourites including Laura Poitras's All the Beauty and the Bloodshed, Lucien Castaing-Taylor and  Verena Paravel's De Humani Corporis Fabrica, Jamie Dack's Palm Trees and Power Lines 25:45-31:14 Alex favourites including Alice Winocour's Paris Memories and Darlene Naponse's Stellar 31:14-50:34 The dominance of Netflix and streamers, Matthew Warchus's Matilda, Causeway 50:34-56:50 The festival circuit: great festival films from earlier this year that disappeared (My Small Land, Lullaby, 32 Sounds), screened only at local festivals (Nelly and Nadine, Framing Agnes) and films that keep coming back. We also discuss the London Film Festival's problematic approach to programming and why we love the Berlinale's programming. 56:50-1:00:24 The lack of live cinema experiences at festivals (like 32 Sounds) in a year when we are being forced to return to cinemas for festivals. 1:00:24-1:05:50 Directors' first features, Charlotte Wells's Aftersun, the rise of Paul Mescal, Georgia Oakley's Blue Jean 1:05:50-1:16:15 Depressing trends in British cinema and the British film industry and how that relates to the country's funding practices. We also draw comparisons to the Canadian film industry. Why is it so hard to get a second feature made? And why do first features have to conform so much to industry standards? We discuss Francis Lee's films, Hope Dickson Leach's film, and several Canadian filmmakers. 1:16:15-1:25:29 Thinking about National Cinema at film festivals, especially Canadian cinema and British cinema 1:25:29-1:31:36 Plan 75, Palm Trees and Power Lines, and other great under-seen first features that keep screening everywhere 1:31:36 Sign offs and related episodes Related episodes Women at Cannes Season: Listen to our five-episode 2022 season on the history of Women directors at the Cannes Film Festival. We highlight some of the best films by women and women filmmakers to screen at the festival. We also discuss the festival's ongoing poor track record of programming films directed by women. Ep. 125: Berlinale 2022: On this omnibus episode, we discuss the highlights of the Berlin Film Festival screening in the festival's under-discussed and under-appreciated (but excellently programmed) sidebars. Ep. 109: TIFF 2021 Part 1: In last year's counterpart to this episode, we discussed the highlights of the 2021 Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF), including Terence Davies's Benediction and Joachim Trier's The Worst Person in the World Ep. 111: TIFF 2021 Part 2: Continuing our discussion on the fall film festivals in 2021, with a focus on TIFF, we discussed Power of the Dog, Ali & Ava, and more highlights from TI

    • 19 min
    My Small Land (Bonus)

    My Small Land (Bonus)

    In this episode, Editor-in-Chief Alex Heeney and Executive Editor Orla Smith discuss the Japanese hidden gem My Small Land, the first feature film from Emma Kawawada. We fell in love with the film at the Berlinale earlier this year, and are excited that it's finally getting a Canadian release this week.
    My Small Land, is the story of a Kurdish teenage girl, Sarya (Lina Arashi) who is an immigrant in Japan. She grew up just outside of Tokyo and has no memories of her home, which was colonised Kurdish territory in Turkey. Sarya ends up in an impossible situation when her family loses their work visas, and travel permission, and she suddenly becomes responsible for her younger siblings with no way to earn money legally. My Small Land follows in the tradition of social realism, and the style of filmmaking owes much to Kore-eda's small scale character dramas.
    My Small Land will be screening at TIFF in Toronto from November 9 to 16 and in Charlottetown PEI until November 8. The film has also screened at VIFF in Vancouver and the Montreal Cinematheque. Watch for it on VOD soon if it's not coming to your city.

    • 9 min
    We're back! Coming soon on the podcast

    We're back! Coming soon on the podcast

    After a six-month hiatus, the Seventh Row podcast is back and revamped. We won't be publishing weekly, but we will regularly release episodes every time there's a film or topic we really, really care about.
    Here's a preview of what's coming in November and December — many of which are members only episodes.
    We also announce our next podcast season due out in 2023. We've been hard at work researching and preparing for this since May (hence the hiatus).
    To become a member for exclusive access to all of our episodes, including all of our in-between season episodes, go to http://seventh-row.com/join

    • 18 min
    Women at Cannes 2022

    Women at Cannes 2022

    On today's episode, we look back at the 2022 Cannes Film Festival: both its many institutional failings when it comes to encouraging and promoting diversity and bunch of great films by women that we watched from the programme.
    This episode of the podcast features Editor-in-Chief Alex Heeney and Executive Editor Orla Smith
    Get the box set of books about women directors — Kelly Reichardt, Céline Sciamma, and Lynne Ramsay — who have screened films in the Cannes Competition.
    Sign up for updates on the podcast and other news about women directors at Cannes this year. 
    On this episode:
    Intro (0:00) How Kelly Reichardt’s Showing Up fared at Cannes 2022 (2:40) The Cannes Film Festival’s backwards approach to diversity (11:10) The award winners (18:17) What we thought of Cannes films we saw (27:12) Closing thoughts (1:00:25) Show notes
    View the history of women directors at Cannes Read Alex's review of Corsage (Marie Kreutzer) Read Alex's review of Under the Fig Trees (Erige Sehiri) Read Alex's review of Everybody Loves Jeanne (Céline Devaux) Read Alex's review of Plan 75 (Chie Hayakawa) Read Alex's review of Falcon Lake (Charlotte Lebon) Read Orla's review of Aloners (Hong Seong-eun) from TIFF 2021 Related episodes
    Women at Cannes Ep. 1: A podcast on the history of women directors at Cannes Women at Cannes Ep. 2: Kelly Reichardt at Cannes 2022 Women at Cannes Ep. 3: Céline Sciamma at Cannes Women at Cannes Ep. 4: Naomi Kawase at Cannes Ep. 126: Run Woman Run: An Indigenous coming of age after 30 film Ep. 122: Joachim Trier’s The Worst Person in the World Ep. 121: Ninjababy & Obvious Child: Unwanted pregnancies in romantic comedies Ep. 119: Mike Leigh’s Naked Ep. 118: The Souvenir Part I and II Ep. 43: Normal People and On Chesil Beach (Members Only) Bonus 23: Sundance 2022: Fiction films (Members Only) Follow Seventh Row on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and read our articles at seventh-row.com.

    • 1 hr 4 min
    Naomi Kawase at Cannes

    Naomi Kawase at Cannes

    On today's episode of the podcast, we discuss Japanese filmmaker Naomi Kawase who has been programmed at the Cannes Film Festival more than almost any other director this century, and why she's one of the best and most under-appreciated filmmakers.
    This episode features Editor-in-Chief Alex Heeney, Executive Editor Orla Smith, Associate Editor Brett Pardy, and special guest Milly Gribben.
    Get the box set of books about women directors — Kelly Reichardt, Céline Sciamma, and Lynne Ramsay — who have screened films in the Cannes Competition.
    Sign up for updates on the podcast and other news about women directors at Cannes this year. 
    On this episode:
    Intro (0:00) Who is Naomi Kawase? (11:45) Our introductions to Naomi Kawase (15:57) The themes in Naomi Kawase’s films (26:00) Sound and sense of place in Kawase’s films (47:15) Why are men so mad at Naomi Kawase? (51:48) Why Cannes hasn’t always been the best launchpad for Naomi Kawase (1:04:50) Closing thoughts (1:07:47) Show notes:
    View the history of women directors at Cannes Watch Naomi Kawase’s TED Talk on her approach to cinema Read Lindsay Pugh’s review of Sweet Bean on her website Woman in Revolt Read Lindsay's interview with Sweet Bean actress Kirin Kiki Read Alex's profile interview with Agnieszka Holland Read Orla's interview with Ammonite director Francis Lee Related episodes:
    Women at Cannes Ep. 1: A podcast on the history of women directors at Cannes Women at Cannes Ep. 2: Kelly Reichardt at Cannes 2022 Women at Cannes Ep. 3: Céline Sciamma at Cannes Ep. 80: The Babadook and Prevenge: Motherhood in horror (Members' Only) Bonus 16: Watching Lena Dunham’s Girls in 2021 (Members' Only) : Water Lilies and Jennifer’s Body: Girlhood and compulsory heterosexuality (Member's Only) Follow Seventh Row on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, and read our articles at seventh-row.com.

    • 1 hr 24 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
21 Ratings

21 Ratings

afields9 ,

Thoughtful film analysis

For all the hundreds of movie review podcasts out there, there are surprisingly few that consistently take interesting films and discuss them thoughtfully and in detail. This is one of those few. The hosts have somewhat different taste than I do, but that’s part of what I find useful, as many of the films they choose are ones that I liked but didn’t give the mental attention they deserved. The discussions are especially strong in terms of psychological elements and characterization, and in representing parts of the film world (eg Canadian and First Nations filmmakers) that don’t get enough critical attention.

nucuplmnjuyh ,

Ammonite, hands

Francis Lee and Kate Winslet did not need make up for the hands to look raw since Kate worked for weeks hunting for fossils in preparation for shooting. It’s in all her interviews.
Wonderful analysis, apart from this tiny detail.

LC_Dee ,

Very well done

Like many others as of late I found out about the wonderful women of Seventh Row because of their ebook on Céline Sciamma. Since purchasing that book I have indulged myself in their thoughtful and insightful conversations about film and filmmakers via their podcast and their writings. I have REALLY enjoyed their Lockdown Film School series and urge others to listen to some really fine and enlightening conversations about film. I am also enjoying learning more about Canadian film and filmmakers.

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