37 min

Sex Workers, Aspirin, and AIDS: Could this Combination of Factors be the Key to More Effective HIV Prevention‪?‬ Finding Genius Podcast

    • Medicine

Could female Kenyan sex workers be the key to preventing HIV spread on a much larger scale? Keith Fowke, Head of the Department of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases Professor at the University of Manitoba, explains the connection between these Kenyan sex workers and HIV resistance, plus what this could mean for the future of HIV prevention as a whole.
Tune in to discover:
The genetic basis for resistance to HIV transmission in certain ethnic groups Stages of the HIV life cycle HIV and immune system factors that could translate to new disease prevention technology HIV and AIDS have devastated parts of the world over the past five decades. Africa has been particularly affected by the epidemic. Now, specific populations of sex workers in Kenya have shown resistance to the HIV virus, despite repeated exposure for decades, thanks to their quiescent immune systems.
What information can be taken from these women and applied to other groups of people across the world to prevent more HIV infections? Keith and Fowke Lab has been studying alternative HIV prevention methods, including low dose aspirin therapy and genital topical antiviral agents, with promising results.
If certain genes increase HIV resistance in some people, can other genes contribute to faster and more aggressive disease progression in others? Can the human immune system be further manipulated by medication or other treatments to protect against HIV infection or progression? How important are the genetics of the person being potentially infected versus the genetics of the virus? Professor Fowke shares the answers to these questions and much more.
For more information on new methods of HIV treatment and ways to prevent infection visit https://www.fowkelab.com/

Available on Apple Podcasts: apple.co/2Os0myK

Could female Kenyan sex workers be the key to preventing HIV spread on a much larger scale? Keith Fowke, Head of the Department of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases Professor at the University of Manitoba, explains the connection between these Kenyan sex workers and HIV resistance, plus what this could mean for the future of HIV prevention as a whole.
Tune in to discover:
The genetic basis for resistance to HIV transmission in certain ethnic groups Stages of the HIV life cycle HIV and immune system factors that could translate to new disease prevention technology HIV and AIDS have devastated parts of the world over the past five decades. Africa has been particularly affected by the epidemic. Now, specific populations of sex workers in Kenya have shown resistance to the HIV virus, despite repeated exposure for decades, thanks to their quiescent immune systems.
What information can be taken from these women and applied to other groups of people across the world to prevent more HIV infections? Keith and Fowke Lab has been studying alternative HIV prevention methods, including low dose aspirin therapy and genital topical antiviral agents, with promising results.
If certain genes increase HIV resistance in some people, can other genes contribute to faster and more aggressive disease progression in others? Can the human immune system be further manipulated by medication or other treatments to protect against HIV infection or progression? How important are the genetics of the person being potentially infected versus the genetics of the virus? Professor Fowke shares the answers to these questions and much more.
For more information on new methods of HIV treatment and ways to prevent infection visit https://www.fowkelab.com/

Available on Apple Podcasts: apple.co/2Os0myK

37 min