33 min

Shadowed Soul - Cedes from Philippines discusses Bi-Polar Shadowed Soul Podcast

    • Mental Health

Cedes Tanchuling from the Philippines talks about her bi-polar in detail. Cedes was very brave in discussing her mental health issue. It is people like Cedes that lets the world know that there is nothing wrong with a mental health conditions.

Cedes background.
"Hello! I am a doctor who got diagnosed with bipolar disorder right after I finished medical school. My diagnosis made so much sense, as it explained a lot of events in my life that had previously left me confused and angry with myself. It was also met with denial and shame from my family. In my country, there remains a stigma about conditions like mine.

I've tried all sorts of career paths -- pathology training locally and abroad, physical medicine and rehabilitation training, even film school -- and I saw a pattern: I would apply, I would (thankfully) get in, and I would quit. I couldn't find my niche -- all I knew was, I liked research and I excelled in writing and editing. I've had papers accepted and presented at international conferences in Europe and in the US.

Currently, I am working at an international communications company that edits and prepares manuscripts for publication. And the funny thing is, you know how I ended up here? Through kindness. A seemingly insignificant good deed I did for someone else led me to opening doors I didn't think were accessible to me.

I have never worked harder in my life, and even if I think sometimes "why am I slaving my butt off for a job I didn't train for?!", I have never been happier or more at peace with my life."

Cedes Tanchuling from the Philippines talks about her bi-polar in detail. Cedes was very brave in discussing her mental health issue. It is people like Cedes that lets the world know that there is nothing wrong with a mental health conditions.

Cedes background.
"Hello! I am a doctor who got diagnosed with bipolar disorder right after I finished medical school. My diagnosis made so much sense, as it explained a lot of events in my life that had previously left me confused and angry with myself. It was also met with denial and shame from my family. In my country, there remains a stigma about conditions like mine.

I've tried all sorts of career paths -- pathology training locally and abroad, physical medicine and rehabilitation training, even film school -- and I saw a pattern: I would apply, I would (thankfully) get in, and I would quit. I couldn't find my niche -- all I knew was, I liked research and I excelled in writing and editing. I've had papers accepted and presented at international conferences in Europe and in the US.

Currently, I am working at an international communications company that edits and prepares manuscripts for publication. And the funny thing is, you know how I ended up here? Through kindness. A seemingly insignificant good deed I did for someone else led me to opening doors I didn't think were accessible to me.

I have never worked harder in my life, and even if I think sometimes "why am I slaving my butt off for a job I didn't train for?!", I have never been happier or more at peace with my life."

33 min

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