25 episodes

A podcast by two Shakespeare nerds (minus the bardolatry).

Shakespeare Anyone‪?‬ Korey Leigh Smith & Elyse Sharp

    • Arts
    • 4.8 • 10 Ratings

A podcast by two Shakespeare nerds (minus the bardolatry).

    Mini-Episode: Christopher Marlowe

    Mini-Episode: Christopher Marlowe

    In today's mini-episode, we are talking all about Christopher Marlowe, one of Shakespeare's contemporaries. We'll talk about what is known about this mysterious playwright's life as well as the legends that surround him!
     
    Shakespeare Anyone? is created and produced by Korey Leigh Smith and Elyse Sharp.
    Music is "Neverending Minute" by Sounds Like Sander.
    Follow us on Instagram at @shakespeareanyonepod for updates or visit our website at shakespeareanyone.com
     
    Works referenced:
    “Christopher Marlowe”. Wikipedia, Wikipedia Foundation, 26 September 2021. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christopher_Marlowe. Accessed 24 September 2021.
    “Marlowe” In Our Time: Science, performance by Melvyn Bragg, et al., season 7, episode 40, BBC 4 Radio, 7 July. 2005.  Accessed 26 September 2021.

    • 18 min
    Twelfth Night: Puritanism and Malvolio

    Twelfth Night: Puritanism and Malvolio

    In today's episode, we are exploring the character of Malvolio by diving into the history of the Puritan Movement in Early Modern England. Because Malvolio is described throughout the play as a Puritan, we will examine what a contemporary understanding of Puritanism would have added to the play (and especially that letter scene) for Shakespeare's audiences. 
    Shakespeare Anyone? is created and produced by Korey Leigh Smith and Elyse Sharp.
    Music is "Neverending Minute" by Sounds Like Sander.
    Follow us on Instagram at @shakespeareanyonepod for updates or visit our website at shakespeareanyone.com
     
    Works referenced:
    Simmons, J. L. “A Source for Shakespeare’s Malvolio: The Elizabethan Controversy with the Puritans.” Huntington Library Quarterly, vol. 36, no. 3, University of California Press, 1973, pp. 181–201, https://doi.org/10.2307/3816599. Accessed 3 Sept. 2021
    Thompson, James Westfall. “Shakespeare and Puritanism.” The North American Review, vol. 212, no. 777, 1920, pp. 228–237. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/25120573. Accessed 30 Aug. 2021.
    Winship, Michael P. Hot Protestants: A History of Puritanism in England and America. Yale University Press, 2018. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctvbnm3ss. Accessed 4 Sept. 2021.

    • 53 min
    Mini-Episode: Shakespeare's Globe Theatre

    Mini-Episode: Shakespeare's Globe Theatre

    In today's episode, we are talking about what might be the most famous theatre in the English-speaking world: The Globe Theatre, and what we know about what it would be like to be an audience member seeing a Shakespeare play at The Globe. 
    Shakespeare Anyone? is created and produced by Korey Leigh Smith and Elyse Sharp.
    Music is "Neverending Minute" by Sounds Like Sander.
    Follow us on Instagram at @shakespeareanyonepod for updates or visit our website at shakespeareanyone.com
     
    Works referenced:
    Alchin, L.K. “Globe Theatre Interior.” Elizabethan Era, Siteseen Ltd., Accessed on 16 May 2012 from http://www.elizabethan-era.org.uk/globe-theatre-interior.htm. 
    Bryson, Bill. “Ch. 6 Years of Fame 1596-1603.” Shakespeare: The World as Stage, Atlas Books, New York, 2016, pp. 124–127. 
    “Globe Theatre.” Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, 31 Aug. 2021, Accessed on 25 Aug. 2021, from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Globe_Theatre. 
    Henslowe, Philip. The diary of Philip Henslowe, from 1591 to 1609. Printed from the original manuscript preserved at Dulwich college. London, Shakespeare Society, 1845.
    No Sweat Shakespeare. Lord Chamberlain's Men and King's Men Company Member Timeline. Instagram, 29 August 2021, https://www.instagram.com/p/CTKPYXxr7Y6/?utm_medium=copy_link.
    “Who Were These People? Audiences in Shakespeare's Day.” Seattle Shakespeare Company, Seattle Shakespeare Company, 23 Jan. 2018, Accessed on 27 Aug. 2021 from https://www.seattleshakespeare.org/who-were-these-people/. 

    • 18 min
    Twelfth Night: Shakespeare's Comedic Tropes

    Twelfth Night: Shakespeare's Comedic Tropes

    Where did Shakespeare get his jokes? In today's episode, we dive into the comedic tropes Shakespeare uses in the plot of Twelfth Night and where they came from. 
    Shakespeare Anyone? is created and produced by Korey Leigh Smith and Elyse Sharp.
    Music is "Neverending Minute" by Sounds Like Sander.
    Follow us on Instagram at @shakespeareanyonepod for updates or visit our website at shakespeareanyone.com
     
    Works referenced:
    Britannica, The Editors of Encyclopaedia. "Commedia dell'arte". Encyclopedia Britannica, 18 Nov. 2019, https://www.britannica.com/art/commedia-dellarte. Accessed 21 August 2021.
    Felver, Charles S. “Robert Armin, Shakespeare's Source for Touchstone.” Shakespeare Quarterly, vol. 7, no. 1, 1956, pp. 135–137. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/2866142. Accessed 21 Aug. 2021.
    Gray, Austin K. “Robert Armine, the Foole.” PMLA, vol. 42, no. 3, 1927, pp. 673–685. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/457397. Accessed 17 Aug. 2021.
    Hobgood, Allison P. “‘Twelfth Night’s’ ‘Notorious Abuse’ of Malvolio: Shame, Humorality, and Early Modern Spectatorship.” Shakespeare Bulletin, vol. 24, no. 3, The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2006, pp. 1–22, http://www.jstor.org/stable/26347474. Accessed 20 Aug. 2021.
    G. Salingar. “The Design of Twelfth Night.” Shakespeare Quarterly, vol. 9, no. 2, 1958, pp. 117–139. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/2867233. Accessed 21 Aug. 2021.
    “La Commedia Dell'arte.” La Commedia Dell'Arte, sites.google.com/site/italiancommedia/home?authuser=0. Accessed 21 Aug. 2021
    Penuel, Suzanne. “Missing Fathers: Twelfth Night and the Reformation of Mourning.” Studies in Philology, vol. 107, no. 1, 2010, pp. 74–96. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/25656037. Accessed 15 Aug. 2021.
    “Twelfth Night (Theatre).” TV Tropes, tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Theatre/TwelfthNight. Accessed 15 Aug. 2021.

    • 46 min
    Mini-Episode: Shakespeare & Cross-dressing

    Mini-Episode: Shakespeare & Cross-dressing

    In today’s episode, we’ll be covering cross-dressing in early modern England. Shakespeare depicts cross-dressing in multiple plays, but what was the contemporary cultural context? We'll dive into early modern reactions to cross-dressing both onstage and off and how Shakespeare uses cross-dressing as a plot device across his plays. 
     
    Shakespeare Anyone? is created and produced by Korey Leigh Smith and Elyse Sharp.
    Music is "Neverending Minute" by Sounds Like Sander.
    Follow us on Instagram at @shakespeareanyonepod for updates or visit our website at shakespeareanyone.com
    Works referenced:
    Cressy, David. “Gender Trouble and Cross-Dressing in Early Modern England.” Journal of British Studies, vol. 35, no. 4, 1996, pp. 438–452. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/176000. Accessed 28 May 2021.
    Howard, Jean E. “Crossdressing, The Theatre, and Gender Struggle in Early Modern England.” Shakespeare Quarterly, vol. 39, no. 4, 1988, pp. 418–440. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/2870706. Accessed 19 May 2021.
    Saccardi, Nadia. “Women Cross-Dressing and the Early Modern.” The Costume Society, The Costume Society, 2014, accessed 18 May 2021 from costumesociety.org.uk/blog/post/women-cross-dressing-and-the-early-modern. 

    • 18 min
    Twelfth Night: Gender and Queer Theory

    Twelfth Night: Gender and Queer Theory

    In today's episode, we explore Shakespeare's Twelfth Night through the lens of Gender and Queer Theory. We take a look at how Early Modern concepts of gender and queerness may have influenced the writing of Twelfth Night and how modern productions use the play to explore themes related to gender and queer identity. 
    In the second half of the episode, we are joined by our first ever guest of the pod, Dr. Sawyer Kemp to continue our discussion on Gender and Queer Theory. 
    Dr. Sawyer Kemp (they/them) is a Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Fellow in Transgender Studies with the Gender & Women’s Studies department at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. Sawyer’s current book project investigates the rhetoric and industry of “accessibility” in contemporary Shakespeare performance. Exploring access as a tool for feminist and queer critique, this project analyzes theatres’ impact on and outreach to communities of trans and gender non-conforming people, sexual assault survivors, and people with disabilities.
    Sawyer’s work has appeared in Shakespeare Quarterly, Shakespeare Studies, The Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies, and the edited collection Teaching Social Justice Through Shakespeare. Their most recent article, “Two Othellos: Transitioning Anti-Blackness” is forthcoming in Shakespeare Bulletin.
     
    Shakespeare Anyone? is created and produced by Korey Leigh Smith and Elyse Sharp.
    Music is "Neverending Minute" by Sounds Like Sander.
    Follow us on Instagram at @shakespeareanyonepod for updates or visit our website at shakespeareanyone.com
     
    Works referenced:
    Ake, Jami. “Glimpsing a ‘Lesbian’ Poetics in ‘Twelfth Night.’” Studies in English Literature, 1500-1900, vol. 43, no. 2, 2003, pp. 375–394. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/4625073. Accessed 20 June 2021.
    Aughterson, Kate, and Ailsa Grant Ferguson. Shakespeare and Gender: Sex and Sexuality in Shakespeare's Drama. The Arden Shakespeare, 2020, pp. 97-121. Accessed 19 June 2021.
    Barker, Roberta. “The ‘Play-Boy,’ the Female Performer, and the Art of Portraying a Lady.” Shakespeare Bulletin, vol. 33, no. 1, 2015, pp. 83–97. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/26355090. Accessed 19 June 2021.
    Charles, Casey. “Gender Trouble in ‘Twelfth Night.’” Theatre Journal, vol. 49, no. 2, 1997, pp. 121–141. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/3208678. Accessed 19 June 2021.
    Coontz, Stephanie, et al. “Marriage vs Friendship.” Call Your Girlfriend, 2 Aug. 2009, www.callyourgirlfriend.com/episodes/2019/08/02/marriage-vs-friendship. 
    Dekkar, Thomas, and Thomas Middleton. “The Roaring Girl. OR Moll Cutpurse.” Folger Shakespeare Library, 21 July 2017. https://emed.folger.edu/sites/default/files/folger_encodings/pdf/EMED-Roaring-reg-3.pdf
    “Introduction.” Twelfth Night, edited by Keir Elam, The Arden Shakespeare, 2008, pp. 57-68, 111-119. Third.
    McManus, Clare. “When Is a Woman Not a Woman? Or, Jacobean Fantasies of Female Performance (1606–1611).” Modern Philology, vol. 105, no. 3, 2008, pp. 437–474. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/591257. Accessed 18 June 2021.
    “Volume 19, Number 4, Fall 2019 Special Issue: Early Modern Trans Studies Guest Editors: Simone Chess, Colby Gordon, and Will Fisher.” Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies, Project MUSE, 24 Sept. 2020, muse.jhu.edu/issue/42946.
     

    • 1 hr 18 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
10 Ratings

10 Ratings

Spiderwoman25 ,

True gem!

This is my favorite new podcast! The topic, while ages old, is fresh and new as these two hosts and thespians, entertain, engage, and educate you about all things Shakespeare. Be prepared to be so drawn into the stories and the events that surround them, you’ll find yourself transported in time.

steepanee ,

Put this in your ear holes right now

If you’re even remotely interested in Shakespeare and his work, but are intimidated by just how MUCH material there is to go through, wow this is the podcast for you! These ladies will breakdown all the different facets of Shakespeare’s famous plays and leave you feeling smart without actually doing the effort of research! Soooo easy.

devdevyus ,

Entertaining and educational

If you don’t know much about Shakespeare, these two actors put his plays and texts into its historical context so it actually makes sense. 🤯🤯

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