7 episodes

She Speaks Too is a podcast that shares the stories of African Americans who have made an impact in their communities: historically, economically and educationally from the South Carolina Low Country and around the world!
Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/patricia-bligen-jones/support

She Speaks Too! Patricia Bligen Jones, Host Patricia Bligen Jones

    • Society & Culture
    • 5.0, 1 Rating

She Speaks Too is a podcast that shares the stories of African Americans who have made an impact in their communities: historically, economically and educationally from the South Carolina Low Country and around the world!
Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/patricia-bligen-jones/support

    For The Culture: A Conversation with The Reverend Demett Jenkins, Lilly Director of Education and Engagement for Faith-Based Communities for the International African American Museum

    For The Culture: A Conversation with The Reverend Demett Jenkins, Lilly Director of Education and Engagement for Faith-Based Communities for the International African American Museum

    The Reverend Demett Jenkins is the Lilly Director of Education and Engagement for Faith-Based Communities, for the International African American Museum in Charleston, SC.  



    She is a Charleston native and a granddaughter of local Civil Rights icon, Esau Jenkins. She is a graduate of St. Andrews High School and South Carolina State University, where she earned a Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice. Additionally, she is a graduate of the Samuel Dewitt School of Theology at Virginia Union University, where she earned a Master of Divinity with a concentration in Pastoral Care and Counseling. She serves as a volunteer chaplain with Coastal Crisis Chaplaincy and a former adjunct professor at the Candler School of Theology at Emory University, Atlanta, GA. 

    She is an ordained minister and is a member of Royal Missionary Baptist Church in North Charleston, SC.



    The International African American Museum is scheduled to open in 2022. 






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    • 32 min
    A Sense of Place: A Conversation with Joseph McGill, Founder and Director of The Slave Dwelling Project

    A Sense of Place: A Conversation with Joseph McGill, Founder and Director of The Slave Dwelling Project

    Joseph McGill is the founder and director of The Slave Dwelling Project.  

    McGill created the project in 2010, and since its inception, he has visited/and slept in 150 slave cabins in 25 states

    and Washington, D.C.

    When he is not visiting historic sites, he conducts the “From Slavery to Freedom” tour at Magnolia Plantation.

    McGill is a graduate of South Carolina State University, where he earned a Bachelor of Arts degree 

    in English.


    He is a native of Kingstree, SC, and a veteran of the United States Air Force. 



    McGill is currently co-writing a book about his work. 



    His motto is simple: "I like my history black, hold the sugar."

    #Ilikemyhistoryblackholdthesugar








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    • 49 min
    A Preserver of Gullah/Geechee Culture: A Conversation with Sunn m'Cheaux, Harvard Gullah Language Instructor

    A Preserver of Gullah/Geechee Culture: A Conversation with Sunn m'Cheaux, Harvard Gullah Language Instructor

    In 2017, Sunn m’Cheaux became the first and only Gullah language instructor at Harvard University. In this role, he teaches a curriculum based on extensive research and his own personal Gullah/Geechee knowledge and experience.

    m'Cheaux was born the middle child of a Pentecostal Holiness minister (father) and missionary (mother) in Charleston, South Carolina. A true Gullah/Geechee “binyah” (native), he was reared in rural Mt. Holly, South Carolina in a familial village established in the late 1850s. The rich Gullah language and culture he absorbed growing up on those sandy Low Country back roads is ever-present in his life as an artist, advocate, and educator.

    m’Cheaux has been fully embraced at Harvard University, having been invited to be a resident lecturer for Project Teach (Harvard’s Official College and Career Awareness Program) and to speak about his course at other universities and events nationally and in the Caribbean Islands–honored as guest lecturer at the 14th Anatol Rodgers Memorial Lecture and visiting scholar at the University of the Bahamas–and he has been featured in Harvard Crimson and Harvard Gazette. 

    He has cultivated a strong following online via social media with frequent viral content ranging from pop culture commentary, allegorical anecdotes, and entertainment, to serious discussions, advocacy, and philanthropy via crowdfunding. He uses this content to promote intellect, ethics, enlightenment, and education. 

    In addition to academic endeavors, m’Cheaux has collaborated creatively in film and television as an actor and, more recently, as a Gullah language and culture consultant. He is set to release an illustrated book of Gullah fables for kids. Moreover, m’Cheaux is completing his mixed media memoir that will incorporate his talents in storytelling, songwriting, spoken word, photography, and education.

    Proud, yet humble about his achievements, m’Cheaux’s personal mantra in all his endeavors is “we outchea,” a celebratory Gullah/Geechee affirmation meaning “we are out here.” He attributes his personal ascension to the collective excellence of his culture and people overall. In that regard, m’Cheaux embodies “Muss tek kyeh de root fa heal de tree,” the Gullah proverb that means, “Must take care of the root to nourish the tree.”





    #GullahgoestoHarvard



     


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    • 1 hr 11 min
    In Praise of Soul Food: A Conversation with KJ Kearney

    In Praise of Soul Food: A Conversation with KJ Kearney

    "Where you spend your money is a political act, as quiet as it’s kept. So by you purposely every Friday deciding to spend your money with a black-owned business, you’re purposely choosing to keep those businesses alive." ~KJ Kearney, Founder of Black Food Fridays

    Kearney is the creator of Black Good Fridays on Instagram, which began as a way to encourage everyone to order from black-owned restaurants on Fridays, a movement the founder said he hopes will be as normalized as Taco Tuesday.

    According to Kearney, Black Food Fridays started as a passion  project that nobody really paid any attention to—to now people calling me asking if they can invest, if they can be part owner, they want to donate money. So I’ve had to like create an LLC and you know, try to start the process of becoming an actual business.

    Kearney is a native of North Charleston, S.C., and a graduate of the South Carolina State University, a historically-black university in Orangeburg, SC. 












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    • 47 min
    The Storyteller: A Conversation with Tatsha Robertson, Author

    The Storyteller: A Conversation with Tatsha Robertson, Author

    Tatsha Robertson is a New York Times best-selling ghost writer. She is the co-author, of the book, The Formula: Unlocking the Secrets to Raising Highly Successful Children, with Harvard professor, Dr. Ronald Ferguson.

    Tatsha, a native of Greenville, SC, is a graduate of Morris College in Sumter, SC, where she received a Bachelor of Arts in English; and a M.A. in Journalism from The Ohio State University. Ms. Robertson has written for several newspapers across the country, including the Boston Globe. She is a former editor of People and Essence magazines. She is a ghost writer for Little Brown Book Group and Harper Collins Publishers; and a writer for BenBella Books. 

    Tatsha and her husband, Nico, live in New York City, where she is currently writing an African-American sci-fi thriller. 

    In today's episode, we discuss the 8 parental roles and how they work:


    The Early Learning Partner lights the fire in young children to learn and develop problem solving skills before they start school.  Most of the highly successful children Ferguson and Robertson interviewed could read basic words by the time they started kindergarten, which impressed teachers and started the children’s school years on a very positive note.
    The Flight Engineer works to ensure that the child is getting everything s/he needs in school, and will step in whenever necessary to make sure this continues.  (This sounds like Ground Control Parenting!)
    The Fixer makes sure that no opportunity is lost or overlooked, regardless of the parent’s resources.  If the parent determines that there is an opportunity his or her child should have access to, s/he won’t stop until a way is found to provide it.
    The Revealer introduces children to worlds beyond their own, again regardless of the family’s income.  If they can’t afford to travel to other lands, they go to local museums and libraries and other cultural institutions where children can explore and learn.
    The Philosopher answers children’s deep and thoughtful questions honest and earnestly and encourages them to ask more.  They help their children try to understand life and find their purpose.
    The Model gives children behavior to emulate.
    The Negotiator teaches children to advocate for themselves, and how to deal with people who exercise authority and power.
    The GPS Navigational Voice ensures that the parents’ voices will be in their children’s heads well after the kids have left home to pursue their futures.




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    • 42 min
    A Granddaughter of the Dust and the Movement: A Conversation with Mignon Clyburn, Former Chairwoman and Commissioner of the FCC

    A Granddaughter of the Dust and the Movement: A Conversation with Mignon Clyburn, Former Chairwoman and Commissioner of the FCC

    The Honorable Mignon Clyburn, is a Charleston, SC native, and former Commissioner and Chairwoman of the Federal Communications Commission. Ms. Clyburn made history as the first African American woman to served as Chairwoman of the FCC under President Barack H. Obama's Administration. She is the eldest daughter of U.S. Representative James E. Clyburn (Democrat, South Carolina 6th District) and the late Emily England Clyburn, a retired librarian and educator. 



    Mignon is a graduate of the University of South Carolina-Columbia; and former editor and publisher of  The Coastal Times, one of two black-owned newspapers that served Charleston, Berkeley and Dorchester counties in the South Carolina Low Country.  


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    • 47 min

Customer Reviews

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Mary Cameron ,

She Speaks Too

These recordings are such a treasure as we work to tell the whole story of South Carolina’s history. Thank you

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