181 episodes

If psychology and pop culture had a baby, you'd get the Shrink Tank Podcast. Each episode of the Shrink Tank Podcast features mental health professionals discussing news in pop culture through the lens of psychology. Join the Shrinks for your weekly session hosted by Dr. Dave Verhaagen, and joined by Dr. Frank Gaskill, Dr. Emma Kate Wright, and Jonathan Hetterly, LPC.

Shrink Tank Podcast ShrinkTank.com

    • TV & Film

If psychology and pop culture had a baby, you'd get the Shrink Tank Podcast. Each episode of the Shrink Tank Podcast features mental health professionals discussing news in pop culture through the lens of psychology. Join the Shrinks for your weekly session hosted by Dr. Dave Verhaagen, and joined by Dr. Frank Gaskill, Dr. Emma Kate Wright, and Jonathan Hetterly, LPC.

    Why Haven’t We Cancelled The Academy Yet? Analyzing the Sexist, Racist, and Elitist Process in Selecting Oscar Nominees

    Why Haven’t We Cancelled The Academy Yet? Analyzing the Sexist, Racist, and Elitist Process in Selecting Oscar Nominees

    Why Haven't we Cancelled The Academy Yet? Analyzing the Sexist, Racist, and Elitist Process in Selecting Oscar Nominees

    This year’s Academy Awards are causing headlines—yet again—for the fact that not a single female director was recognized in the Best Director category.



    In today's episode of the Shrink Tank Podcast, our panel of Shrinks discuss the inherent sexism, racism, and elitism of the Academy's selection process. How is the Academy not facing any consequences for their antiquated process? With today's landscape of Cancel Culture, we wonder how long the Academy can get away with snubbing females, persons of color, or those who fall into both categories...



    Listen to 'Why Haven't we Cancelled The Academy Yet? Analyzing the Sexist, Racist, and Elitist Process in Selecting Oscar Nominees'' here, or anywhere you listen to podcasts.



     

    Being Human

    Every week our panel of Shrinks breaks down trending topics of psychology in the news that we call Being Human.



    Keeping in line with today’s discussion centering around sexism and feminism, we wanted to discuss how the American Psychological Association’s guidelines were implemented to better to support clients in the wake of the #MeToo movement.



    In 2019, the APA issued new guidelines to help therapists who treat girls and women, noting that changes to "education, work, reproductive and caregiving roles, and personal relationships" in the last several decades have led to greater equality, but have also changed the ways in which women encounter adversity in the U.S. and around the world.



    Therapists are human—and no human is impervious to cultural attitudes about gender or race. It is absolutely possible for therapists to be sexist, racist, ageist, you name it.



    The guidelines encourage practitioners to think about how their own experiences and beliefs may impact their treatment. The guidelines focus heavily on the persistence of subtle forms of sexism, including microaggressions.



    You can read the study that inspired our discussion here.



     

    Watch us on YouTube!

    Great news! We're on another platform. Be sure to check out the video version of this podcast, available on our YouTube channel. You can subscribe to our channel here.





    Speak your Mind!

    Comment below or send us your thoughts at feedback@shrinktank.com. Your input could even be featured on the next episode of the Shrink Tank Podcast!



    Need a longer session with the Shrinks? Check out our last episode here.



     

    • 36 min
    What is the Psychology of Classism? Analyzing ‘Parasite’, ‘Knives Out’, and ‘Us’

    What is the Psychology of Classism? Analyzing ‘Parasite’, ‘Knives Out’, and ‘Us’

    What is the Psychology of Classism? Analyzing 'Parasite', 'Knives Out', and 'Us'

    The year's films Parasite, Knives Out and Us all explored how classism impacts our day to day life.



    In today's episode of the Shrink Tank Podcast, our panel of Shrinks discuss the erosion of middle class, the exploitation of the lower class, and the evolution of economic status over the last decade.



    Listen to 'What is the Psychology of Classism? Analyzing 'Parasite', 'Knives Out', and 'Us'' here, or anywhere you listen to podcasts.



     

    Being Human

    Every week our panel of Shrinks breaks down trending topics of psychology in the news that we call Being Human.



    Parasite, Knives Out and Us all are rooted in the theme of classism.



    To break that down and inspire a larger conversation, we turned to the internet to find an article to frame our first discussion.



    According to research published by the American Psychological Association, people who see themselves as being in a higher social class may tend to have an exaggerated belief that they are more adept than their equally capable lower-class counterparts, and that overconfidence can often be misinterpreted by others as greater competence in important situations, such as job interviews.



    You can read the study that inspired our discussion here.



     

    Watch us on YouTube!

    Great news! We're on another platform. Be sure to check out the video version of this podcast, available on our YouTube channel. You can subscribe to our channel here.

    Speak your Mind!

    Comment below or send us your thoughts at feedback@shrinktank.com. Your input could even be featured on the next episode of the Shrink Tank Podcast!



    Need a longer session with the Shrinks? Check out our last episode here.



     

    • 36 min
    Analyzing ‘The Mandalorian’: How Trauma and Attachment Impact our Identity

    Analyzing ‘The Mandalorian’: How Trauma and Attachment Impact our Identity

    Analyzing 'The Mandalorian': How Attachment Impacts our Identity

    The Mandalorian explores how an individual's moral development — or moral code — fosters their decision making and personal identity.



    The show follows lead character Mando as he puts himself in the crossfire of the Empire to protect the Baby Yoda.



    In today's episode of the Shrink Tank Podcast, our panel of Shrinks discuss the psychological elements present, including classism, self-determination, and attachment.



    Listen to Analyzing 'The Mandalorian': How Trauma and Attachment Impact our Identity here, or anywhere you listen to podcasts.



     

    Being Human

    Every week our panel of Shrinks breaks down trending topics of psychology in the news that we call Being Human.



    Since The Mandalorian follows a bounty hunter’s mission, we wanted to talk about real-life bounty hunting—yes, it still exists in 2019.



    In a recent article from GQ, writer Jeff Winkler got licensed as a bail enforcement agent, otherwise known as a BEA, and spent months working on-site to collect research. What he found was a mess for pretty much everyone caught up in a broken system.



    The article covers how bounty hunting works, it’s variances based on state legislature, as well as his own anecdotes of his training and “missions” he’s taken on.



    Our panel of Shrinks breaks down their thoughts on these findings.



    You can read the study that inspired our discussion here.



     

    Watch us on YouTube!

    Great news! We're on another platform. Be sure to check out the video version of this podcast, available on our YouTube channel. You can subscribe to our channel here.



     

    Speak your Mind!

    Comment below or send us your thoughts at feedback@shrinktank.com. Your input could even be featured on the next episode of the Shrink Tank Podcast!



    Need a longer session with the Shrinks? Check out our last episode here.

    • 32 min
    Analyzing ‘Watchmen’: Reverse Racism, Reparations, and Morality

    Analyzing ‘Watchmen’: Reverse Racism, Reparations, and Morality

    Analyzing 'Watchmen': Reverse Racism, Reparations, and Morality

    Watchmen is an American superhero drama television series, which serves as a continuation of the 1987 DC Comics limited series of the same name created by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons.



    The HBO drama is set in an alternate reality where white supremacist group, the Seventh Kavalry, has appropriated Rorschach's writings and masked image to wage violent war against minorities and the police that enforce special reparations for victims of racial injustice.



    Inspired by the show, today we wanted to cover the topics of reverse racism, reparations, and the psychology of Watchmen in general.



    In today's episode of the Shrink Tank Podcast, our panel of Shrinks discuss the psychology of HBO's Watchmen, reverse racism, and reparations.



    Listen to 'Analyzing 'Watchmen': Reverse Racism, Reparations, and Morality' here, or anywhere you listen to podcasts.



     

    Being Human

    Every week our panel of Shrinks breaks down trending topics of psychology in the news that we call Being Human.



    Since HBO’s Watchmen covers the concepts of racism and reparations, we wanted to cover the topic of discrimination.



    As our politics have fractured increasingly around race, there seems to be more and more confusion about who’s discriminating against whom.



    A national survey reported that both blacks and whites believed that discrimination against blacks had declined over the past few decades, but whites believed that discrimination against whites was now more common than discrimination against blacks.



    The reason, say the study’s authors Michael Norton and Sam Sommers, is that whites see discrimination as a zero-sum game. The more they thought discrimination against blacks was decreasing, the more they felt discrimination against whites was increasing.



    Our panel of Shrinks breaks down their thoughts on these findings.



    You can read the study that inspired our discussion here.



     

    Watch us on YouTube!

    Great news! We're on another platform. Be sure to check out the video version of this podcast, available on our YouTube channel. You can subscribe to our channel here.





    Speak your Mind!

    Comment below or send us your thoughts at feedback@shrinktank.com. Your input could even be featured on the next episode of the Shrink Tank Podcast!



    Need a longer session with the Shrinks? Check out our last episode here.

    • 29 min
    Greta Thunberg: The Psychology of Teenage Activism

    Greta Thunberg: The Psychology of Teenage Activism

    Greta Thunberg: Psychology of Teenage Activism



    Greta Thunberg is a 16-year-old Swedish environmental activist on climate change whose campaigning has gained international recognition.



    Every Friday, Thunberg would skip school in order to sit outside the Swedish parliament to call for stronger action on global warming by holding up a sign saying (in Swedish) "School strike for the climate". Her efforts have inspired other students to embrace this movement, titled “Fridays for Future.”



    In today's episode of the Shrink Tank Podcast, our panel of Shrinks discuss Greta Thunberg's environmental advocacy, climate change, Autism Spectrum Disorder as well as the influence of youth on our world.



    Listen to 'Greta Thunberg: Psychology of Teenage Activism' here, or anywhere you listen to podcasts.



     

    Being Human

    Every week our panel of Shrinks breaks down trending topics of psychology in the news that we call Being Human.



    We can’t have a discussion about Greta Thunberg’s activism without bringing up the topic of climate change.



    According to an article Newsweek, psychologists warned parents and guardians about being climate change alarmists, noting an increasing number of children who are being treated for "eco-anxiety."



    Researchers at the University of Bath and members of the Climate Psychology Alliance (CPA) in the United Kingdom say children are commonly being subjected to a barrage of concerns about the future of the planet and "environmental doom."

    But CPA members said they don't want the rising "eco-anxiety" social phenomenon in children to be classified as a mental illness because it is a "rational" fear, unlike the causes behind most standard anxiety issues.



    Our panel of Shrinks breaks down their thoughts on these findings.



    You can read the study that inspired our discussion here.



     

    Watch us on YouTube!

    Great news! We're on another platform. Be sure to check out the video version of this podcast, available on our YouTube channel. You can subscribe to our channel here.





    Speak your Mind!

    Comment below or send us your thoughts at feedback@shrinktank.com. Your input could even be featured on the next episode of the Shrink Tank Podcast!



    Need a longer session with the Shrinks? Check out our last episode here.

    • 31 min
    Jeopardy! Host Alex Trebek Is Teaching Us An Important Lesson Through His Battle with Cancer

    Jeopardy! Host Alex Trebek Is Teaching Us An Important Lesson Through His Battle with Cancer

    Jeopardy, Alex Trebek, Cancer, and Positive Psychology

    Alex Trebek, the longtime host of Jeopardy! has been a pop culture staple since the show’s revival in 1984. 



    Apart from being a beloved icon of public television, he’s made waves this year for how he’s eloquently handled his diagnosis of Stage 4 pancreatic cancer in the public eye. 



    Trebek first announced in March of 2019 that he had been diagnosed with Stage 4 pancreatic cancer. Following a round of chemotherapy, he said in May that his cancer was in remission. In September, however, Trebek said he was undergoing another round of chemotherapy following a setback in his recovery.



    In today's episode of the Shrink Tank Podcast, our panel of Shrinks discuss Alex Trebek dealing with cancer in the public eye, handling tough situations with grace and dignity, choosing to live despite dying, and positivity.



    Listen to 'Jeopardy Host Alex Trebek Is Teaching Us an Important Lesson Through His Battle with Cancer' here, or anywhere you listen to podcasts.



     

    Being Human

    Every week our panel of Shrinks breaks down trending topics of psychology in the news that we call Being Human.



    For those of you that are not familiar with Erik Erikson’s theory of psychosocial development, there are eight stages across the lifespan that help to define an individual’s personality.



    Since we’ll be discussing how Alex’s Trebek has handled his cancer diagnosis in the public eye, we wanted to touch on Erikson’s eighth and final stage— Integrity vs. Despair.



    At each stage of psychosocial development, people are faced with a crisis that acts as a turning point in development. Successfully resolving the crisis leads to developing a psychological virtue that contributes to overall psychological well-being.



    The integrity versus despair stage begins as the aging adult tackles the problem of his or her mortality. This stage is often triggered by life events such as retirement, losing a spouse, losing friends or acquaintances, facing a terminal illness, or other major life changes.



    This stage’s key conflict centers on questioning whether or not the individual has led a meaningful, satisfying life.



    Our panel of Shrinks breaks down their thoughts on these findings.



    You can read the study that inspired our discussion here.



     

    Watch us on YouTube!

    Great news! We're on another platform. Be sure to check out the video version of this podcast, available on our YouTube channel. You can subscribe to our channel here.



     

    Speak your Mind!

    Comment below or send us your thoughts at feedback@shrinktank.com. Your input could even be featured on the next episode of the Shrink Tank Podcast!



    Need a longer session with the Shrinks? Check out our last episode here.

    • 29 min

Customer Reviews

WBbeach ,

Watchmen

I have thoroughly enjoy all the podcasts. It is refreshing to listen to intelligent, honest, open discussions (pepered with humor) on pop culture, politics, and psychology. It oftens sparks my curiousity and motivates me to read further on variety of subjects. (Conversly it also causes me to waste time binging on netflix.)
The most recent episode discussed "Watchmen" and briefly touched on reparations. This is a subject I thought I understood and had an opinion on until very recently. Since you mentioned the desire to understand the subject better. I thought I would take a moment to recommend a good starting place, "Wilmington on Fire." This movie gave me a better understanding for both some of the legal and moral grounds for the claim. If you have a chance to particpate in a viewing and discussion, I highly recommend it. Experts are present to lead the discussions and answer questions in that forum. I know they producers travel and hold viewings and discussion both locally and nationally.

Ponch Boy ,

There is no other podcast out there like Shrink Tank

What a wonderfully weird and insightful podcast. I love that the topics cover a wide array of subject matters. Sometimes it's a film, other times it's a celebrity.

It's clear to me that the hosts genuinely enjoy one another - the chemistry is one of the strengths. The second major strength is that they talk about psychology and mental health but not in a monotonous, boring way. So many psychology or mental health podcasts and videos are incredibly boring. This podcast and these people are anything but boring.

jcmsrn ,

Pop culture intersecting psychology- a cornucopia of delights!

This has become my favorite Saturday morning listening! These culture in the news discussions are delightful, relatable, and stealthily plumb everyday psychology for all. It keeps me in tune with pop culture through very entertaining interactions between these psychologists. It’s the genuine interaction between them where I learn the most/am reminded how to hold a genuine positive perspective with others allowing for personality differences, holding intelligent and thoughtful discussions, and generously sprinkling in with humor and geeky factoids for overall self growth.

Top Podcasts In TV & Film

Listeners Also Subscribed To