42 episodes

The independent-minded book review magazine that combines good looks, good writing and a personal approach. Slightly Foxed introduces its readers to books that are no longer new and fashionable but have lasting appeal. Good-humoured, unpretentious and a bit eccentric, it’s more like a well-read friend than a literary magazine.

Come behind the scenes with the staff of Slightly Foxed to learn what makes this unusual literary magazine tick, meet some of its varied friends and contributors, and hear their personal recommendations for favourite and often forgotten books that have helped, haunted, informed or entertained them.

Slightly Foxed Slightly Foxed: The Real Reader's Quarterly

    • Arts
    • 4.8 • 210 Ratings

The independent-minded book review magazine that combines good looks, good writing and a personal approach. Slightly Foxed introduces its readers to books that are no longer new and fashionable but have lasting appeal. Good-humoured, unpretentious and a bit eccentric, it’s more like a well-read friend than a literary magazine.

Come behind the scenes with the staff of Slightly Foxed to learn what makes this unusual literary magazine tick, meet some of its varied friends and contributors, and hear their personal recommendations for favourite and often forgotten books that have helped, haunted, informed or entertained them.

    Barbara Pym and Other Excellent Women

    Barbara Pym and Other Excellent Women

    A latter-day Austen, an academic, a romantic, a comic, a caustic chronicler of the commonplace . . . The novelist Barbara Pym became beloved and Booker Prize-nominated in the late twentieth century, yet many rejections, years in the literary wilderness and manuscripts stored in linen cupboards preceded her revival.




    Paula Byrne, author of The Adventures of Miss Barbara Pym, and Lucy Scholes, critic, Paris Review columnist and editor at McNally Editions, join the Slightly Foxed team to plumb the depths and scale the peaks of Barbara Pym’s writing, life and loves. From Nazi Germany to the African Institute; from London’s bedsit land to parish halls; from unrequited love affairs with unsuitable men to an epistolary friendship with Philip Larkin; and from rejection by Jonathan Cape to overnight success via the TLS, we trace Pym’s life through her novels, visiting the Bodleian and Boots lending libraries along the way. There’s joy in Some Tame Gazelle, loneliness in Quartet in Autumn, and humour and all human experience in between, with excellent women consistently her theme.




    We then turn from Pym to other writers under or above the radar, finding darkness in Elizabeth Taylor, tragicomedy in Margaret Kennedy and real and surreal rackety lives in Barbara Comyns. To round out a cast of excellent women, we discover Daphne du Maurier’s Rebecca was foretold in Elizabeth von Arnim’s Vera, and we recommend an eccentric trip with Jane Bowles and her Two Serious Ladies, as well as theatrical tales from a raconteur in Eileen Atkins’s memoir.  (Episode duration: 57 minutes; 16 seconds)

    Books Mentioned
    We may be able to get hold of second-hand copies of the out-of-print titles listed below. Please get in touch with Jess in the Slightly Foxed office for more information.





    Flora Thompson, Lark Rise and Over to Candleford & Candleford Green, Slightly Foxed Edition Nos. 58 and 59 (1:39)
    Paula Byrne, The Adventures of Miss Barbara Pym (2:11)
    Aldous Huxley, Crome Yellow is out of print (4:28)
    Barbara Pym, Quartet in Autumn (6:33)
    Barbara Pym, The Sweet Dove Died is out of print (8:16)
    Barbara Pym, Some Tame Gazelle (14:07)
    Barbara Pym, Excellent Women (19:06)
    Barbara Pym, A Glass of Blessings (22:14)
    Barbara Pym, A Few Green Leaves is out of print (32:28)
    Nicola Beauman, The Other Elizabeth Taylor (36:33)
    Elizabeth Taylor, Mrs Palfrey at the Claremont (37:00)
    Elizabeth Taylor, Angel (38:27)
    Barbara Comyns, The Vet’s Daughter (41:16)
    Barbara Comyns, The House of Dolls (42:16)
    Barbara Comyns, Who Was Changed and Who Was Dead (42:45)
    Barbara Comyns, Our Spoons Came from Woolworths (43:03)
    Barbara Comyns, A Touch of Mistletoe (43:46)
    Elizabeth von Arnim, Vera (47:47)
    Margaret Kennedy, Troy Chimneys, McNally Editions (48:59)
    Jane Bowles, Two Serious Ladies (50:37)
    Eileen Atkins, Will She Do? (52:39)

    Related Slightly Foxed Articles



    Not So Bad, Really, Frances Donnelly on Barbara Pym, Issue 11

    Hands across the Tea-shop Table, Sue Gee on Elizabeth Taylor, A Game of Hide and Seek and Nicola Beauman, The Other Elizabeth Taylor, Issue 58

    There for the Duration, Juliet Gardiner on Elizabeth Taylor, At Mrs Lippincote’s, Issue 13

    Sophia Fairclough and Me, Sophie Breese on the novels of Barbara Comyns, Issue 42

    Other Links



    McNally Editions is an American imprint devoted to hidden gems (2:47)
    In the Paris Review Re-Covered column, Lucy Scholes exhumes the out-of-print and forgotten books that shouldn’t be
    Lucy Scholes is the host of the Virago OurShelves podcast

    The Barbara Pym Society

    Opening music: Preludio from Violin Partita No.3 in E Major by Bach




    The Slightly Foxed Podcast is hosted by Philippa Lamb and produced by Podcastable

    • 57 min
    Adrian Bell: Back to the Land

    Adrian Bell: Back to the Land

    The farmer-cum-writer Adrian Bell is best-known for his rural trilogy of Suffolk farming life, Corduroy, Silver Ley and The Cherry Tree. To explore Bell’s life and writing the Slightly Foxed editors are joined by Richard Hawking, chairman of the Adrian Bell Society, author of At the Field’s Edge: Adrian Bell and the English Countryside and editor of A Countryman’s Winter Notebook, a selection of Bell’s newspaper columns.




    We follow Bell from middle-class London to a farming apprenticeship in Suffolk, where his inability to do the most basic physical tasks taught him a new respect. A farmer, he discovered, held in his head thousands of facts about animals, crops and fodder, while his eye for a pig was ‘as subtle as an artist’s’. As Bell grappled with life on the land, the locals considered him to be a recuperating invalid or an incompetent idiot but in time he grew into a bona fide countryman, one who criticized Thomas Hardy’s portrayal of the ploughman as ‘only a man harrowing clods’ and who managed to set up his own small farm, Silver Ley.




    From the pride of the wagon maker, the repeal of the corn act in the 1920s and the heartbreak of farmers going bankrupt to his bohemian mother making butter, his friend John Nash illustrating Men and the Fields and Second World War soldiers packing Corduroy in their kit bags, we learn that Bell is the perfect writer to reconnect people with the land, one whose work still feels relevant today. As his close friend Ronald Blythe noted, Bell was ‘in love with words’, a love that led to his position as the founder of The Times cryptic crossword. 




    And in our usual round-up of recommended reading we enter Walter de la Mare’s dreams, explore Shackleton’s Antarctica and visit Catherine Fox’s fictional Lindchester, the setting for her glorious twenty-first-century Trollopian tales. (Episode duration: 42 minutes; 18 seconds) 

    Books Mentioned
    We may be able to get hold of second-hand copies of the out-of-print titles listed below. Please get in touch with Jess in the Slightly Foxed office for more information.





    Flora Thompson, Lark Rise, Slightly Foxed Edition No. 58 (0:55)
    Flora Thompson, Over to Candleford & Candleford Green, Slightly Foxed Edition No. 59 will be published on 1 June and is available to order now.
    Richard Hawking, At the Field’s Edge: Adrian Bell and the English Countryside (2:28)
    Adrian Bell, A Countryman’s Winter Notebook. A Slightly Foxed special release with an introduction by Richard Hawking and specially commissioned illustrations by Suffolk artist Beth Knight (2:30)
    Adrian Bell, Men and the Fields (4:23)
    Adrian Bell, Corduroy, Plain Foxed Edition (4:54)
    Adrian Bell, Silver Ley is currently out of print
    Adrian Bell, The Cherry Tree, Slightly Foxed Edition No. 38 (6:46)
    Edmund Blunden, Undertones of War (7:08)
    Ann Gander, Adrian Bell: Voice of the Countryside is out of print (16:56)
    Walter Rose, The Village Carpenter is out of print (18:20)
    Adrian Bell, The Open Air: An Anthology of English Country Life is out of print (18:53)
    Adrian Bell, My Own Master is out of print (22:52)
    Adrian Bell, Sunrise to Sunset is out of print (23:27)
    Adrian Bell, The Flower and the Wheel is out of print (26:26)
    James Rebanks, English Pastoral (30:06)
    Catherine Fox, Acts and Omissions (33:06)
    Walter de la Mare, Behold, This Dreamer! (34:52)
    William Grill, Shackleton’s Journey and Bandoola: The Great Elephant Rescue (36:21)

    Related Slightly Foxed Articles



    Winter Noon, extract from Adrian Bell, A Countryman’s Winter Notebook


    Another Country, Christian Tyler on Adrian Bell, Corduroy, Issue 22

    From the Farmhouse Window, Melissa Harrison on Adrian Bell, Silver Ley, Issue 46

    Ploughing On, Hazel Wood on Adrian Bell, The Cherry Tree, Issue 54

    How long had I been standing here under the old cherry tree?, extract from Adrian Bell, The Cherry Tree


    Other Links



    The Adrian Bell Society (2:25)

    www.ruralmuseums.org.uk (30:57)

    Opening music:

    • 42 min
    Idle Moments: Literary Loafers through the Ages and Pages

    Idle Moments: Literary Loafers through the Ages and Pages

    In the spirit of Plato’s Symposium, the Slightly Foxed team enter into lively dialogue with two distinguished magazine editors, Tom Hodgkinson of the Idler and Harry Mount of the Oldie, and learn lessons from notable loafers in literature. We begin with Doctor Johnson, an icon of indolence who wrote an essay called ‘The Idler’ and liked time to ponder; this lazy lexicographer claimed his dictionary would take three years to write when in fact it would take nine . . .




    The wisdom-loving philosophers of Ancient Greece made a case for carving out leisure time, while the anchorite Julian of Norwich favoured a life of seclusion in which ‘all shall be well’. At the age of thirty-eight Michel de Montaigne retired to a grand book-filled chateau to test out ideas in essays, while George Orwell wrote book reviews in hungover misery. Izaak Walton found contemplation in The Compleat Angler and Jerome K. Jerome found humour in Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow, while the autodidactic Mitford sisters sought wild freedom.




    We enjoy a leisurely spell with loungers in fiction, visiting Lady Bertram and her pug in Mansfield Park, taking to Lady Diana Cooper’s bed in A Handful of Dust, retreating to Aunt Ada Doom’s room in Cold Comfort Farm, settling into the quiet comfort of Mycroft Holmes’s Diogenes Club and meeting Thomas Love Peacock’s Honourable Mr Listless along the way. And, to finish, there are the usual wide-ranging reading recommendations for when you have an idle moment. (Episode duration: 46 minutes; 56 seconds)

    Books Mentioned
    We may be able to get hold of second-hand copies of the out-of-print titles listed below. Please get in touch with Jess in the Slightly Foxed office for more information.





    Izaak Walton, The Compleat Angler (9:49)
    Michel de Montaigne, The Complete Essays (11:48)
    Sarah Bakewell, How to Live (13:05)
    Plato, Symposium (17:51)
    Janina Ramirez, Julian of Norwich (18:58)
    Evelyn Waugh, A Handful of Dust (26:53)
    Oscar Wilde, The Importance of Being Earnest (28:21)
    Jerome K. Jerome, Three Men in a Boat; Idle Thoughts of an Idle Fellow is out of print (29:44)
    Robert Burton, The Anatomy of Melancholy will be available in a new edition in July 2022 (32:29)
    Stella Gibbons, Cold Comfort Farm (34:41)
    Geoffrey Willans, The Lost Diaries of Nigel Molesworth is out of print (39:51)
    Gamel Woolsey, Death’s Other Kingdom (40:40)
    Thomas Love Peacock, Nightmare Abbey (42:29)
    David Graeber and David Wengrow, The Dawn of Everything (43:28)
    Jane Smiley, The Strays of Paris (46:56)



    Related Slightly Foxed Articles




    ‘Study to be quiet’, Ken Haigh on Izaak Walton, The Compleat Angler, Issue 54 (9:49)

    The Great Self-Examiner, Anthony Wells on the essays of Michel de Montaigne, Issue 69 (11:48)

    Poste-Freudian Therapy, Michele Hanson on Stella Gibbons, Cold Comfort Farm, Issue 10 (34:41)

    Peacock’s Progress, J. W. M. Thompson on Thomas Love Peacock, Headlong Hall; Crotchet Castle, Issue 5 (42:29)



    Other Links



    The Idler magazine
    The Oldie magazine




    Opening music: Preludio from Violin Partita No.3 in E Major by Bach




    The Slightly Foxed Podcast is hosted by Philippa Lamb and produced by Podcastable

    • 46 min
    Literary Drinking: Alcohol in the Lives and Work of Writers

    Literary Drinking: Alcohol in the Lives and Work of Writers

    Booze as muse or a sure road to ruin? In this month’s episode, William Palmer – author of In Love with Hell: Drink in the Lives and Work of Eleven Writers – and Henry Jeffreys – author of Empire of Booze and The Cocktail Dictionary – join the Slightly Foxed team to mull over why alcohol is such an enduring feature in literature. 




    From the omnipresence of cocktails in John Cheever’s short stories and ritual aperitifs in Patricia Highsmith’s Ripley novels to Mr Picksniff falling into Mrs Todger’s fireplace in Martin Chuzzlewit and P. G. Wodehouse’s hangover remedies for booze-soaked Bertie Wooster, drinks are social signifiers in fiction. Charles Dickens was fond of sherry cobblers and Jean Rhys knocked back Pernod in Paris, while Malcolm Lowry was a dipsomaniac and Flann O’Brien dreamed up alcoholic ink for the Irish Times, rendering readers drunk from fumes. We ask why gin denotes despair and port is always jovial, and question whether hitting the bottle helps or hinders the creative process in writers.




    Following a convivial sherry, we’re whisked away on a wet-your-whistle-stop tour of drinking dens with our friends at London Literary Tours, barrelling from bars propped up by Oscar Wilde to the follies of Dylan Thomas at Soho’s French House via Ian Fleming’s Vesper cocktail at Dukes. And we finish with a final round of reading recommendations, visiting a whisky distillery in Pakistan in Lawrence Osbourne’s The Wet and the Dry, enjoying Happy Hour with Marlowe Granados and stopping for a nightcap at Kingsley Amis’s ghostly local The Green Man.

    (Episode duration: 41 minutes; 16 seconds)

    Books Mentioned
    We may be able to get hold of second-hand copies of the out-of-print titles listed below. Please get in touch with Jess in the Slightly Foxed office for more information.





    Anne Fadiman, The Wine Lover’s Daughter, Slightly Foxed Edition No. 57 (1:39)
    William Palmer, In Love with Hell: Drink in the Lives and Work of Eleven Writers (2:24)
    Henry Jeffreys, Empire of Booze (2:33)
    Henry Jeffreys, The Cocktail Dictionary

    Dylan Thomas, Portrait of the Artist as a Young Dog (3:41)
    Kingsley Amis, Everyday Drinking (4:45)
    Flann O’Brien, At Swim-Two-Birds and The Third Policeman (6:40)
    Jean Rhys, Wide Sargasso Sea (11:16)
    Jean Rhys, Good Morning, Midnight (11:49)
    Patricia Highsmith, The Talented Mr Ripley (12:17)
    Patricia Highsmith, Diaries and Notebooks

    Raymond Carver, What We Talk About When We Talk About Love (14:54)
    Edward St Aubyn, The Patrick Melrose Novels (17:03)
    Douglas Stuart, Shuggie Bain (19:01)
    Charles Dickens, Martin Chuzzlewit (20:42)
    John Cheever, Collected Stories (23:26)
    Jeremy Lewis, Kindred Spirits (26:05)
    Ladybird Books: What to Look For in . . . Spring, Summer, Autumn and Winter (33:05)
    Kingsley Amis, The Green Man (35:13)
    Lawrence Osbourne, The Wet and the Dry (36:45)
    Marlowe Granados, Happy Hour (38:27)



    Related Slightly Foxed Articles




    The Smoking Bishop, William Palmer on drinking and drunkenness in Dickens, Issue 16 (8:52)

    On the Randy Again, William Palmer on Dylan Thomas, Portrait of the Artist as a Young Dog, Issue 30 (3:41)

    Cheers!, Henry Jeffreys on Bernard DeVoto, The Hour & Kingsley Amis, Everyday Drinking, Issue 68 (4:45)

    A Quare One, Patrick Welland on the novels of Flann O’Brien, Issue 41 (6:40)

    Voyage in the Dark, Patricia Cleveland-Peck on the novels of Jean Rhys, Issue 4 (10:22)

    With a Notebook and a Ukelele, Gordon Bowker on the stories of Malcolm Lowry, Issue 37 (19:46)

    A Visit from God, William Palmer on Kingsley Amis, The Green Man, Issue 20 (35:09)



    Other Links



    London Literary Tours (28.00)



    Opening music: Preludio from Violin Partita No.3 in E Major by Bach




    The Slightly Foxed Podcast is hosted by Philippa Lamb and produced by Podcastable

    • 41 min
    Rewriting the Script: The short life and blazing art of Sylvia Plath with her acclaimed biographer Heather Clark

    Rewriting the Script: The short life and blazing art of Sylvia Plath with her acclaimed biographer Heather Clark

    Heather Clark, Professor of Contemporary Poetry at the University of Huddersfield and author of the award-winning biography Red Comet, joins the Slightly Foxed team from New York to dispel the myths that have come to surround Sylvia Plath’s life and art.




    Tired of the cliché of the hysterical female writer, and of the enduring focus on Plath’s death rather than her trailblazing poetry and fiction, Clark used a wealth of new material – including juvenilia, unpublished letters and manuscripts, and psychiatric records – to explore Plath’s literary landscape. She conjures the spirit of the star English student at Smith College who won a Fulbright scholarship to Cambridge University and who brought her enormous appetite for life to her writing and relationships. We follow her life from the ‘mad passionate abandon’ of her thunderclap meeting with Ted Hughes, rebellion against genteel verse and her creation of a dark ‘potboiler’ in The Bell Jar to her belief that a full literary life and a family unit can coexist and the outpouring of first-rate poems fuelled by rage in her final days. She introduced female anger and energy into the poetic lexicon with ‘Lady Lazarus’, ‘Daddy’, ‘Ariel’ and more; poems that were considered shocking at the time, but which are now regarded as masterpieces.




    And there are more biographies to be found in our round-up of reading recommendations – of renegade anthropologists and female abstract expressionists – as well as a relationship between a father and his young son told through illustrated letters that leap off the page in Letters to Michael, with wonderful readings by the actor Nigel Anthony. (Episode duration: 48 minutes; 48 seconds)

    Books Mentioned
    We may be able to get hold of second-hand copies of the out-of-print titles listed below. Please get in touch with Jess in the Slightly Foxed office for more information.





    Heather Clark, Red Comet: The Short Life and Blazing Art of Sylvia Plath

    The Letters of Sylvia Plath Vol. I: 1940-1956
    The Letters of Sylvia Plath Vol. II: 1956-1963
    Sylvia Plath, Three Women: A Poem for Three Voices, a radio play (23:28)
    Sylvia Plath, The Bell Jar (30:16)
    Sylvia Plath, Ariel: The Restored Edition (39:23)
    Sylvia Plath, The Colossus

    Janet Malcolm, The Silent Woman: Sylvia Plath & Ted Hughes

    Lucie Elven, The Weak Spot (41:55)
    Charles King, Gods of the Upper Air is not currently available in the UK (43:44)
    Lily King, Euphoria (44:06)
    Mary Gabriel, Ninth Street Women (44:15)
    Charles Phillipson, Letters to Michael: a father writes to his son 1945–1947. With thanks to the actor Nigel Anthony for the readings. (45:19)



    Related Slightly Foxed Articles & Podcasts



    Slightly Foxed Podcast Episode 29: A Poet’s Haven. Dr Mark Wormald, a scholar on the life and writings of Ted Hughes, on the Barrie Cooke archive 



    Other Links


    Heather Clark’s website
    Heather Clark wins The Slightly Foxed Best First Biography Prize 2020 for Red Comet
    Listen to the 1961 BBC Interview with Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes (17:07)
    Listen to the BBC Radio 3 Arts & Ideas podcast on Sylvia Plath, Anne Sexton, and Seamus Heaney (44:45)
    The artist Heather Phillipson’s Sketches from Space Instagram account, where she first shared Charles Phillipson’s letters to Michael (45:38)

    The National Poetry Library, Southbank Centre, London (47:31)




    Opening music: Preludio from Violin Partita No.3 in E Major by Bach




    The Slightly Foxed Podcast is hosted by Philippa Lamb and produced by Podcastable

    • 48 min
    Graphic Novels: A Comic Turn with Posy Simmonds & Paul Gravett

    Graphic Novels: A Comic Turn with Posy Simmonds & Paul Gravett

    The cartoonist, writer and illustrator Posy Simmonds brilliantly captures the ambitions and pretensions of the literary world, and the journalist and curator Paul Gravett has worked in comics publishing for decades. Together they bring graphic novels and comic books to the foreground with the Slightly Foxed team. We draw moral lessons from the Ally Sloper cartoons of the 1870s, glimpse Frans Masereel’s wordless woodcut stories of the 1920s, view the pictorial politics of Citizen 13660 by Miné Okubo in the 1940s and revisit Art Spiegelman’s 1992 Pulitzer Prize-winning Maus before taking a closer look at more contemporary works.




    From a tragicomic summer with Joff Winterhart, nuclear explosions with Raymond Briggs, the shadow of James Joyce with Mary and Bryan Talbot and an Iranian childhood with Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis, the discussion moves through panels, frames, splashes and spreads to Posy Simmonds’s own methods in bringing literature to life, including crosshatching to Vivaldi. Originally serialized in the Guardian, Posy’s Gemma Bovery builds on the bones of Flaubert’s Madame Bovary and Tamara Drewe draws from Hardy’s Far from the Madding Crowd, while Cassandra Darke takes inspiration from Dickens’s A Christmas Carol. Though rooted in the classics, the devil is in Posy’s detail, be it real French coffee pots, the joy of characters’ names, such as Kevin Penwallet, and fictional places, such as Tresoddit.




    We continue our travels off the beaten track with our usual round-up of reading recommendations, and a trip to Gilbert White’s House and Gardens in Hampshire, where we view the landscapes that sparked his evergreen classic The Natural History of Selborne. (Episode duration: 44 minutes; 39 seconds)

    Books Mentioned
    We may be able to get hold of second-hand copies of the out-of-print titles listed below. Please get in touch with Jess in the Slightly Foxed office for more information.






    Ally Sloper: A Moral Lesson, cartoons by Marie Duval and words by Judy’s office boy is out of print (4:48)
    Miné Okubo, Citizen 13660 (6:29)
    George Takei, They Called Us Enemy (7:25)
    Jules Feiffer, Passionella and Other Stories is out of print (9:05)
    Art Spiegelman, Maus (10:37)
    Mary M. Talbot & Bryan Talbot, Dotter of Her Father’s Eyes (12:52)
    Joff Winterhart, Days of the Bagnold Summer (13:22)
    Raymond Briggs, When the Wind Blows (15:42)
    Raymond Briggs, Ethel & Ernest (17:07)
    Posy Simmonds, Gemma Bovery (17:48)
    Posy Simmonds, Tamara Drewe (17:48)
    Marjane Satrapi, Persepolis (28:31)
    Posy Simmonds, Cassandra Darke (29:04)
    Riad Sattouf, The Arab of the Future (30:24)
    Alison Bechdel, Fun Home (31:20)
    Posy Simmonds, Literary Life Revisited

    Paul Gravett, Posy Simmonds

    Emma Tennant, Burnt Diaries is out of print (34:20)
    Robert Macfarlane, The Old Ways (37:28)

    Our Time, an anthology commissioned by The Lakes International Comic Art Festival (38:29)
    Laurie Lee, As I Walked Out One Midsummer Morning. Published in our series of Slightly Foxed Editions, along with Cider with Rosie (39:54)
    Gilbert White, The Natural History of Selborne (41:24)




    Related Slightly Foxed Articles & Illustrations



    Underwear Was Important, Hazel Wood on the cartoons of Posy Simmonds, Issue 15

    Cover illustration by Posy Simmonds, Issue 16
    Inside cover illustration by Posy Simmonds, Issue 60

    Touched with a Secret Delight, Melissa Harrison on Gilbert White, The Natural History and Antiquities of Selborne, Issue 48




    Other Links



    Posy Simmonds Close Up, Cartoonmuseum Basel, Switzerland. The exhibition runs until 24 October 2021 (2:39)

    The bd BOUM festival, Blois, France. The festival is chaired by Posy Simmonds and runs from 19-21 November 2021

    Gosh! Comics, London, UK (31:58)

    The Lakes International Comic Art Festival, Kendal, UK (32:08)

    Thought Bubble, The Yorkshire Comic Convention, Harrogate, UK (32:26)

    Gilbert White’s House & Gardens, Selborne, UK (41:13)




    Opening music: Preludio from Violin Partita No.3 in E

    • 44 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
210 Ratings

210 Ratings

Margie Beehouse ,

No equal on the app store

An unalloyed pleasure. Thank goodness these literary types will return in April, October and January. Meanwhile, to the archive!

Sandy of Seattle ,

Whole Podacast

Utterly delicious. Sitting knitting on a windy wet day - thought provoking and chucklesome. Do not silence the dogs, please!!! Love it.

Rebecca Brosnan ,

Sheer Joy

This podcast has a special way of making the very best of our collective culture as approachable as an afternoon cup of tea with friends.

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