1 hr

S2 Ep26: Language Ideology and Linguistic Diversity in Speech and Language Pathology SLP Nerdcast

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Get .1 ASHA CEU here
Episode Summary:
In this week’s episode, guest expert Chelsea Privette helps us get real about language ideology and our responsibilities to shift the “standard” as language professionals supporting linguistically and culturally diverse communicators.  There was more than one “ah-ha” moment across this Nerdcast as Chelsea helps us consider tangible strategies to shift our thinking and practice around core issues in the field. There’s also a healthy dose of challenging the status-quo, urging us to question many of our long-standing speech-language pathology paradigms.  Come along with us on the journey - you might get a little uncomfortable - but open your mind, fill up your wine glass, and tune in to learn about language ideology in the United States and what it has to do with you as an SLP.
Chelsea is a doctoral candidate at the University of Arizona researching bilingualism and the interactions of Spanish and African American English in preschoolers. You can learn more about Chelsea here.

Learning Outcomes
1. Define the dominant language ideology in the United States.
2. Describe linguistic environment in inclusive terms.
3. Distinguish between inclusive and anglocentric terminology in clinical documentation and professional meetings.

References
Artiles, A. J. (1998). The dilemma of difference: Enriching the disproportionality discourse with theory and context. The Journal of Special Education, 32(1), 32-36.
Berthele, R. (2002). Learning a second dialect: A model of idiolectal dissonance. Multilingua, 21, 327-344.
Blum, S. D. (2017). Unseen WEIRD assumptions: The so-called language gap discourse and ideologies of language, childhood, and learning. International Multilingual Research Journal, 11(1), 23-38. 
Brandt, D. (1998). Sponsors of literacy. College Composition and Communication, 49(2), 165-185.
Baugh, J. (2003). Linguistic profiling. In S. Makoni, G. Smitherman, A. F. Ball, & A. K. Spears (Eds.), Black linguistics: Language, society, and politics in Africa and the Americas (pp. 155-168). Routledge.
Boser, U., Wilhelm, M., & Hanna, R. (2014). The Power of the Pygmalion Effect Teachers Expectations Strongly Predict College Completion. Center for American Progress. Retrieved from https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED564606.pdf
Carter, P. M. (2013). Shared spaces, shared structures: Latino social formation and African American English in the U.S. South. Journal of Sociolinguistics, 17(1), 66-92. 
Goldstein, L. M. (1987). Standard English: The only target for nonnative speakers of English? TESOL Quarterly, 21(3), 417-436.
Hill, J. H. (2008). The everyday language of white racism. Wiley-Blackwell.
Minow, M. (1990). Making all the difference: Inclusion, exclusion, and American law. Cornell University Press.
Oetting, J. B. (2020). General American English as a dialect: A call for change. The ASHA LeaderLive. https://leader.pubs.asha.org/do/10.1044/leader.FMP.25112020.12/full/.
Oetting, J. B., Gregory, K. D., & Rivière, A. M. (2016). Changing how speech-language pathologists think and talk about dialect variation. Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups SIG 16, 1(1), 28-37.
Purnell, T., Idsardi, W., & Baugh, J. (1999). Perceptual and phonetic experiments on American English dialect identification. Journal of Language and Social Psychology, 18, 10-30.
Stanford, S., & Muhammad, B. (2018). The confluence of language and learning disorders and the school-to-prison pipeline among minority students of color: A critical race theory. American University Journal of Gender, Social Policy & the Law, 26(2), 691-718

Online Resources:
Larson, A. (2021). Bias in Bilingualism: Changing How We Talk About Language Learners. Bilinguistics. https://bilinguistics.com/catalog/speech-pathology-ceus/webinar/bias-in-bilingualism/
Summarizes Soto, Larson, & Olszewski paper (forthcoming?)
Stanford, S. (2021). Transforming Our Language to Change Clinical Narratives for Youth with Disorders. Bilingui

Get .1 ASHA CEU here
Episode Summary:
In this week’s episode, guest expert Chelsea Privette helps us get real about language ideology and our responsibilities to shift the “standard” as language professionals supporting linguistically and culturally diverse communicators.  There was more than one “ah-ha” moment across this Nerdcast as Chelsea helps us consider tangible strategies to shift our thinking and practice around core issues in the field. There’s also a healthy dose of challenging the status-quo, urging us to question many of our long-standing speech-language pathology paradigms.  Come along with us on the journey - you might get a little uncomfortable - but open your mind, fill up your wine glass, and tune in to learn about language ideology in the United States and what it has to do with you as an SLP.
Chelsea is a doctoral candidate at the University of Arizona researching bilingualism and the interactions of Spanish and African American English in preschoolers. You can learn more about Chelsea here.

Learning Outcomes
1. Define the dominant language ideology in the United States.
2. Describe linguistic environment in inclusive terms.
3. Distinguish between inclusive and anglocentric terminology in clinical documentation and professional meetings.

References
Artiles, A. J. (1998). The dilemma of difference: Enriching the disproportionality discourse with theory and context. The Journal of Special Education, 32(1), 32-36.
Berthele, R. (2002). Learning a second dialect: A model of idiolectal dissonance. Multilingua, 21, 327-344.
Blum, S. D. (2017). Unseen WEIRD assumptions: The so-called language gap discourse and ideologies of language, childhood, and learning. International Multilingual Research Journal, 11(1), 23-38. 
Brandt, D. (1998). Sponsors of literacy. College Composition and Communication, 49(2), 165-185.
Baugh, J. (2003). Linguistic profiling. In S. Makoni, G. Smitherman, A. F. Ball, & A. K. Spears (Eds.), Black linguistics: Language, society, and politics in Africa and the Americas (pp. 155-168). Routledge.
Boser, U., Wilhelm, M., & Hanna, R. (2014). The Power of the Pygmalion Effect Teachers Expectations Strongly Predict College Completion. Center for American Progress. Retrieved from https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED564606.pdf
Carter, P. M. (2013). Shared spaces, shared structures: Latino social formation and African American English in the U.S. South. Journal of Sociolinguistics, 17(1), 66-92. 
Goldstein, L. M. (1987). Standard English: The only target for nonnative speakers of English? TESOL Quarterly, 21(3), 417-436.
Hill, J. H. (2008). The everyday language of white racism. Wiley-Blackwell.
Minow, M. (1990). Making all the difference: Inclusion, exclusion, and American law. Cornell University Press.
Oetting, J. B. (2020). General American English as a dialect: A call for change. The ASHA LeaderLive. https://leader.pubs.asha.org/do/10.1044/leader.FMP.25112020.12/full/.
Oetting, J. B., Gregory, K. D., & Rivière, A. M. (2016). Changing how speech-language pathologists think and talk about dialect variation. Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups SIG 16, 1(1), 28-37.
Purnell, T., Idsardi, W., & Baugh, J. (1999). Perceptual and phonetic experiments on American English dialect identification. Journal of Language and Social Psychology, 18, 10-30.
Stanford, S., & Muhammad, B. (2018). The confluence of language and learning disorders and the school-to-prison pipeline among minority students of color: A critical race theory. American University Journal of Gender, Social Policy & the Law, 26(2), 691-718

Online Resources:
Larson, A. (2021). Bias in Bilingualism: Changing How We Talk About Language Learners. Bilinguistics. https://bilinguistics.com/catalog/speech-pathology-ceus/webinar/bias-in-bilingualism/
Summarizes Soto, Larson, & Olszewski paper (forthcoming?)
Stanford, S. (2021). Transforming Our Language to Change Clinical Narratives for Youth with Disorders. Bilingui

1 hr