32 episodes

An archive of live events from the Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of the American Indian, including music, dance, plays, symposia and more. True HD coming soon.

Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian Live Events in HD Smithsonian

    • Arts
    • 4.0 • 3 Ratings

An archive of live events from the Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of the American Indian, including music, dance, plays, symposia and more. True HD coming soon.

    • video
    Native/American Fashion: Inspiration, Appropriation and Cultural Identity - Closing Remarks

    Native/American Fashion: Inspiration, Appropriation and Cultural Identity - Closing Remarks

    Native/American Fashion: Inspiration, Appropriation, and Cultural Identity explores fashion as a creative endeavor and an expression of cultural identity, the history of Native fashion, issues of problematic cultural appropriation in the field, and examples of creative collaborations and best practices between Native designers and fashion brands. In this Karen Kramer of Peabody Essex Museum gives some closing remarks.

    Karen Kramer, curator of Native American and Oceanic Art and Culture at the Peabody Essex Museum, has helped produce ten major exhibitions on Native American art and culture at the museum. She curated Native Fashion Now, a nationally traveling, groundbreaking exhibition celebrating contemporary Native American fashion, and the paradigm-shifting Shapeshifting: Transformations in Native American Art, which dismantled stereotypes and explored concepts of change, worldview, and politics in historical and contemporary Native art. Kramer directs the Peabody Essex Museum�s innovative Native American Fellowship program, which provides training for rising Native American leaders in the museum, cultural, and academic sectors.

    • 8 min
    • video
    Native/American Fashion: Inspiration, Appropriation and Cultural Identity - Creative Collaborations

    Native/American Fashion: Inspiration, Appropriation and Cultural Identity - Creative Collaborations

    Native/American Fashion: Inspiration, Appropriation, and Cultural Identity explores fashion as a creative endeavor and an expression of cultural identity, the history of Native fashion, issues of problematic cultural appropriation in the field, and examples of creative collaborations and best practices between Native designers and fashion brands. In this segment, speakers from the third panel, Creative Collaborations, return to the stage to take questions from the audience. The panel is moderated by Eileen Karp of the Fashion Institute of Technology, State University of New York. Panelists include founder and owner of Beyond Buckskin Jessica Metcalfe and artist/designers Virgil Ortiz and Douglas Miles.

    • 13 min
    • video
    Native/American Fashion: Inspiration, Appropriation and Cultural Identity - Creative Collaborations

    Native/American Fashion: Inspiration, Appropriation and Cultural Identity - Creative Collaborations

    Native/American Fashion: Inspiration, Appropriation, and Cultural Identity explores fashion as a creative endeavor and an expression of cultural identity, the history of Native fashion, issues of problematic cultural appropriation in the field, and examples of creative collaborations and best practices between Native designers and fashion brands. In this segment, we hear from the second panelist to speak on the topic Creative Collaborations, artist and designer Douglas Miles.

    Douglas Miles (San Carlos Apache/Akimel O�odham) fuses bold, graffiti-inspired graphics with Apache iconography and language. Years ago he painted his first skateboard, for his son. His brand, Apache Skateboards�the first Native-owned skateboard company�grew from that deck, and soon it included a line of streetwear. In 2009�10, Miles collaborated with the internationally popular sportswear brand Volcom. His designs for Volcom�s Stone-Age line of clothing and accessories brought Apache design to contemporary skate culture. His mission is to empower Native youth and highlight social issues that confront their communities today.

    • 23 min
    • video
    Native/American Fashion: Inspiration, Appropriation and Cultural Identity - Creative Collaborations

    Native/American Fashion: Inspiration, Appropriation and Cultural Identity - Creative Collaborations

    Native/American Fashion: Inspiration, Appropriation, and Cultural Identity explores fashion as a creative endeavor and an expression of cultural identity, the history of Native fashion, issues of problematic cultural appropriation in the field, and examples of creative collaborations and best practices between Native designers and fashion brands. In this segment, we hear from the second panelist to speak on the topic Creative Collaborations, artist and designer Virgil Ortiz.

    Virgil Ortiz (Cochiti Pueblo), contemporary Native American artist and fashion designer, grew up in New Mexico in a family of Cochiti Pueblo potters in which telling stories, collecting clay, gathering wild plants, and producing figurative pottery all were part of everyday life. After a highly successful collaboration with fashion icon Donna Karan, during which he developed boldly patterned textiles based on his graphic decorative painting, Ortiz has since launched his own fashion line. His designs, such as sharp laser-cut leather jackets, swinging taffeta skirts, cashmere sweaters, and silk scarves, echo the voluminous contours and sinuous motifs of Pueblo pottery while showcasing the richness of indigenous high fashion and compelling storytelling of Pueblo culture and history.

    • 11 min
    • video
    Native/American Fashion: Inspiration, Appropriation and Cultural Identity - Creative Collaborations

    Native/American Fashion: Inspiration, Appropriation and Cultural Identity - Creative Collaborations

    Native/American Fashion: Inspiration, Appropriation, and Cultural Identity explores fashion as a creative endeavor and an expression of cultural identity, the history of Native fashion, issues of problematic cultural appropriation in the field, and examples of creative collaborations and best practices between Native designers and fashion brands. In this segment, we hear from the first panelist to speak on the topic Creative Collaborations, the founder and owner of Beyond Buckskin, Jessica Metcalfe.

    Jessica R. Metcalfe (Turtle Mountain Chippewa) is the owner and author of the website Beyond Buckskin, which focuses on all topics related to Native American fashion, including historical adornment, contemporary design, and issues related to cultural appropriation in the fashion industry. She is the owner of the Beyond Buckskin Boutique, which promotes and sells Native American-made couture, streetwear, jewelry, and accessories, and is based out of the Turtle Mountain Indian Reservation in Belcourt, North Dakota. Metcalfe, who wrote her doctoral dissertation on Native designers of high fashion, has co-curated exhibitions and taught college courses in Native American studies, studio art, art history, and literature. Her current work focuses on American Indian art, clothing, and design from all time periods, with an emphasis on contemporary artists.

    • 20 min
    • video
    Native/American Fashion: Inspiration, Appropriation and Cultural Identity - Creative Collaborations

    Native/American Fashion: Inspiration, Appropriation and Cultural Identity - Creative Collaborations

    Native/American Fashion: Inspiration, Appropriation, and Cultural Identity explores fashion as a creative endeavor and an expression of cultural identity, the history of Native fashion, issues of problematic cultural appropriation in the field, and examples of creative collaborations and best practices between Native designers and fashion brands. In this segment, Eileen Karp of the Fashion Institute of Technology, State University of New York, gives a short introduction to the third panel of the day, Creative Collaborations, which she is moderating.

    • 1 min

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