17 episodes

Tents, evictions and gentrification. SOLD OUT envisions what home should be, by telling stories from California, the epicenter of the nation’s housing crisis. A new season of SOLD OUT examines the patterns of evictions. Not just the ones that have made headlines during the pandemic, but the ones that have quietly disrupted lives for years. It dives into the racism, inequality, power and privilege that influence evictions, and introduces the people who are fighting for change, to help keep people from losing their homes. Hosted by KQED's Erin Baldassari and Molly Solomon.
Let us know what you think of this show by taking a quick survey: https://bit.ly/3MtSfig

SOLD OUT: Rethinking Housing in America KQED

    • History
    • 4.7 • 301 Ratings

Tents, evictions and gentrification. SOLD OUT envisions what home should be, by telling stories from California, the epicenter of the nation’s housing crisis. A new season of SOLD OUT examines the patterns of evictions. Not just the ones that have made headlines during the pandemic, but the ones that have quietly disrupted lives for years. It dives into the racism, inequality, power and privilege that influence evictions, and introduces the people who are fighting for change, to help keep people from losing their homes. Hosted by KQED's Erin Baldassari and Molly Solomon.
Let us know what you think of this show by taking a quick survey: https://bit.ly/3MtSfig

    Your Stories and Solutions for the Housing Crisis

    Your Stories and Solutions for the Housing Crisis

    What are your biggest ideas on how to solve the housing crisis? How has housing impacted/shaped your life?
    Throughout this season, we wanted to hear from you – the SOLD OUT audience. We asked you to get in touch, and you came through! Through voice memos, email and social media, dozens of listeners reached out and shared stories of housing insecurity and loss, advocacy work, and visions for an equitable housing future. 
    In this bonus episode, we hear from seven people for whom housing is at the center of everything. 
    Still want to contact the show? Email us at housing@kqed.org

    • 29 min
    The Rent Eats First

    The Rent Eats First

    The number one reason people are evicted is falling behind on rent. So how do you keep that from happening in the first place? 
    In the final chapter in our series on evictions, we look at Section 8; the promise, the problems, and the history. And the push for guaranteed income – because if the rent is out of reach, maybe the solution is to help pay it.
    Read the episode transcript here.

    • 35 min
    Landlord v Tenant

    Landlord v Tenant

    Step into an eviction court and you’ll likely see it: most landlords have attorneys while tenants do not. Eviction cases move quickly, and representation can be the thing that balances the scale — making it easier for people to understand their rights and to navigate the complex system. 
    From New York to California’s Central Valley, tenants are fed up and demanding the right to counsel. It’s a movement that has gained more attention in the wake of the pandemic, and in the face of rising rents. Today, we go to court.
    Read the episode transcript here.

    • 34 min
    The Landlord’s Game

    The Landlord’s Game

    The decision to evict someone can affect them and their ability to find stable housing for years. It’s a decision that gives landlords a lot of power. 
    We explore when and why landlords decide to evict. And look at the shift in property owners in recent years, from small “mom and pop” owners, towards more investors and corporations, and what that means for tenants and our housing system.
    Read the episode transcript here.

    • 30 min
    The Color of Evictions

    The Color of Evictions

    Evictions do not affect everyone equally. Millions of renters in this country have struggled to make rent after losing income during the pandemic. And Black renters, particularly Black women, are more likely to be evicted than white renters.
    Jean Kendrick and her son were evicted during the early days of the pandemic. We follow their journey to find affordable housing, while examining what’s driving these disparities in evictions – including generations of racist housing policies and predatory home lending practices.
    Read the transcript here.

    • 38 min
    Evicted: A Suburban Story

    Evicted: A Suburban Story

    The place with the highest eviction rate in the Bay Area during the pandemic wasn't a big city like Oakland or San Francisco — instead it was a suburb that has been radically transformed by housing crisis after housing crisis. Antioch, a city on the outskirts of the Bay has been a destination for people looking for affordable housing. But now it’s at the center of a growing eviction crisis.
    In the first episode of our second season, we visit a neighborhood in Antioch where it seems everyone you meet has an eviction story.
    Read the transcript here.

    • 31 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
301 Ratings

301 Ratings

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I can’t wait to hear the rest of the episodes!

yuuuihh hj feedf ,

Excellent podcast

Very good coverage of an important topic. Evictions are so damaging. Corporate landlords are taking over. Commodification of housing is damaging our society.

landlorddave ,

SOLD OUT by my friend NPR

Trying to draw conclusions about housing policy by focusing on eviction is like learning about romantic love by studying ugly court divorces.

A married couple has a 50 percent chance of one partner getting booted by a spouse in divorce. My eviction rate, as a landlord, is only 2 percent.

This series should consider showing respect and appreciation to landlords who provide housing. Statistically, we are quite a bit more reliable than YOUR spouse.

We landlords feel useful and thrilled to provide a happy home to our customers.
Most of the time.
But we make human mistakes.
Every nasty person you see on the local news wants housing from us. Sometimes they lie so well that we say yes. Sometimes we give a tenant a second chance even when we know they have cheated (on us or another landlord).
Sometimes we need an escape from the poor tenant selection decision we have made.

I propose:

I won’t say you can’t divorce your abusive spouse. Please don’t tell me I can’t evict my horrible tenant.

—-
I hope you grammar police npr folks appreciate my intended deviancy.

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