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Personal Attention, SpyCast Listeners
Known to be the podcast real spies listen to -(STOP)- eavesdrop on conversations with high level sources from around the world -(STOP)- spychiefs molehunters defectors covert operators analysts cyberwarriors and researchers debriefed by SPY Historian Hammond -(STOP) stories secrets tradecraft and technology discussed -(STOP)- HUMINT SIGINT OSINT IMINT GEOINT and more -(STOP)- rumored to be professional education internal communication and public information -(STOP)- entire back catalog available online for free -(STOP)- please investigate this claim with all possible haste -(STOP)- SPY Historian Hammond said to have a Scottish accent -(STOP)- is this a countermeasure or a hearts-and-minds campaign?
(END TELEGRAM)

SpyCast SpyCast

    • History
    • 4.3 • 1.1K Ratings

TOP SECRET
Personal Attention, SpyCast Listeners
Known to be the podcast real spies listen to -(STOP)- eavesdrop on conversations with high level sources from around the world -(STOP)- spychiefs molehunters defectors covert operators analysts cyberwarriors and researchers debriefed by SPY Historian Hammond -(STOP) stories secrets tradecraft and technology discussed -(STOP)- HUMINT SIGINT OSINT IMINT GEOINT and more -(STOP)- rumored to be professional education internal communication and public information -(STOP)- entire back catalog available online for free -(STOP)- please investigate this claim with all possible haste -(STOP)- SPY Historian Hammond said to have a Scottish accent -(STOP)- is this a countermeasure or a hearts-and-minds campaign?
(END TELEGRAM)

    “CIA Officers Turned Authors” – with David McCloskey & James Stejskal

    “CIA Officers Turned Authors” – with David McCloskey & James Stejskal

    Summary
    David McCloskey (Twitter; Website) and James Stejskal (Twitter; LinkedIn) join Andrew to discuss writing about espionage. They are both former intelligence officers.  

    What You’ll Learn
    Intelligence

    What it is like writing spy fiction as a former practitioner

    How fact informs fiction

    Writing as a former analyst compared to as a former operator (James) 

    Reactions by the intelligence community to practitioners-turned-authors

    Reflections

    The heaven and hell of being an author 

    The process of getting a process

    And much, much more…

    Episode Notes
    Hear two intelligence formers discuss life as current novelists. 
    Where does fact end, and fiction begin when you are a former CIA officer writing fiction? What parts of your own story bleed into the novel? Are the characters composites of people you knew in your line of work or are they entirely fictional? 
    To answer these questions and more, this week, I sat down with David McCloskey, former CIA analyst and author of Damascus Station, a book David Petraeus described as “the best spy novel I have ever read,” and James Stejskal, author of Appointment in Tehran, which has been called “a textbook clandestine operation involving…US Army Special Forces and a clandestine CIA Case Officer,” which James would know something about, since he was both. 
    And…
    Spy fiction received quite the blow in the space of a 6-month period (Dec 2020-May 2021) which saw the passing of both John Le Carre and Jason Matthews, two formers who served in British and American intelligence. Le Carre was in MI5 and MI6 while Matthews had a long career in the CIA. David and James join a distinguished cast of formers who became novelists, including Ian Fleming, Graham Greene and Dame Stella Rimington. 

    Quote of the Week
    "There are far more edits on, short articles I wrote that weren't even going to the president than on the book, so your writing is being critiqued at all levels. I I think when I did write for the PDB [Presidential Daily Brief], I don't think I'm making this up, I believe it was 9 or 10 layers of review. You could probably argue that sometimes that makes it worse, but you have to be able at all stages to roll with the punches and to write and to try to make things very clear." – David McCloskey.

    Resources
    Headline Resources


    Damascus Station, D. McCloskey (2021)


    Appointment in Tehran, J. Stejskal (2021)


    Andrew’s Recommendation


    The Looking Glass War, J. Le Carre (1965)

    Le Carre doubles down on disabusing the public’s romanticization of intelligence 


    *SpyCasts*


    “Snake Eaters, Detachment A, CIA” – James Stejskal (2022)


    “American Spy” – Lauren Wilkinson (2021)


    “Red Widow” – Alma Katsu (2021)


    “American Traitor” – Brad Taylor (2021)


    “The Evolution of Spy Fiction”  - Wesley Wark (2011)


    Beginner Resources


    15 Best Espionage Novels, M. Warwick, Mal Warwick On Books (2022) [article]


    Novelists Who Became Spies, C. Cumming, Crime Reads (2019) [article]


    Best Spy Novels According to a Spy, A. Katsu, Crime Reads (2021) [article]


    Books


    Missions of the SOE and OSS in WWII, J. Stejskal (Casemate, 2021)


    Special Forces Berlin, J. Stejskal (Casemate, 2017)


    On Writing, S. King (Scribner, 2010)


    Spy Fiction, Spy Films & Real Intelligence, W. Wark (Routledge, 1991)


    Articles


    Nine Examples of Spy Fiction Books, Masterclass (2021)


    How to Write a Spy Thriller, Masterclass (2021)


    How End of Cold War Changed Spy Fiction, J. Ciabattari, BBC Culture (2014)


    Videos


    All the Old Knives, O. Steinhauer, SPY (2022)


    Spy Writing in the Real World, Hayden Center (2021)


    The Spy Writers You Love to Read, SPY (2020)


    Primary Sources 


    American Observer, CIA (1970)


    Barry Farber Show, CIA (1970)


    *Wildcard Resource*


    The Riddle of the Sands, E. Childers (1903)

    An early spy novel that presaged the anti-German “spy fever” that struck allied countries before and during WWI 

    • 1 hr 5 min
    “Becoming a Russian Intelligence Officer” – with Janosh Neumann

    “Becoming a Russian Intelligence Officer” – with Janosh Neumann

    Summary
    Janosh Neumann (LinkedIn; Website) joins Andrew (Twitter; LinkedIn) to discuss life in the FSB. He was born in the Soviet Union to parents in the “business.” 

    What You’ll Learn
    Intelligence

    Why Jan defected to the United States

    How you get recruited and trained as a Russian intelligence officer

    What it is like to recruit and run agents in Moscow

    His take on what he did for the Russian state

    Reflections

    Learn to connect with anybody

    Making a life-changing and potentially life-ending decision

    And much, much more…

    Episode Notes
    Have you ever wondered how a Russian intelligence officer is trained? Ever wondered what it would be like to be a defector? Ever wondered what it’d be like to be given three choices, shoot yourself, get shot, or go on the run?
    If so, you’ll enjoy this week’s episode with Jan Neumann, who was born Alexy Yurievich Artamonov in the former Soviet Union. 
    Jan’s father was a KGB internal affairs officer, and he would go on to join one of its successors, the FSB, or Federal Security Service, in which his wife also served. He speaks about a number of projects he is involved in, here in the States, where he now resides.
    And…
    Jan is the Co-Founder of RealSpyComics, which will be the first independent comic publisher dedicated to telling true intelligence stories. The International Spy Museum is a partner on this venture, because if there is one thing, we have a lot of – its spy stories!

    Quote of the Week
    "I'm not a big fan of ballet, but one of my sources was a big ballet fan. So, I had to go to the Bolshoi Theater, watch this again, and again, and again, I had to do some learning to be able to talk to the guy. And same thing was happening with the art as well. so going to some galleries and talk to the people, be sure that they're using at least same terminology as they are, to be able in the future to support the conversation, be interesting to this person whom you're trying to approach." – Janosh Neumann

    Resources
    Headline Resources


    Russian Spy, American Defector: with Janosh Neumann, YouTube, 2020


    “Almost American, 1-5,” Aftershock Comics (2021-22)

    Andrew’s Recommendation

    Russian Intelligence, K. Riehle (NIU, 2022) [download entire book here for free)
    *SpyCasts*


    “Dealing with Russia” – Jim Olson (2022)


    “KGB Spy & NCIS Agent” – Jack Barsky & Keith Mahoney


    “The Spymaster’s Prism” – Jack Devine (2021)


    “The Corrupted State” – Ilya Zaslavskiy (2016)


    Beginner Resources


    Introduction to the Three Main Arms of Russian Intelligence, Globe & Mail (n.d.) [video]


    Putin, Power & Poison: Russia’s Elite FSB Spy Club, BBC (2018) [article]


    From Spy to President: Rise of Putin, Vox (2017) [video]


    Federal Security Service (FSB), Britannica (n.d.) [article]

    Books


    Putin’s People, C. Belton (William Collins, 2021)


    Return of the Russian Leviathan, S. Medvedev (Polity, 2019)


    Near & Distant Neighbors, J. Haslam (FS&G, 2016)


    The New Nobility, A. Soldatov & I. Borogan (Public Affairs, 2010)

    Memoirs


    Spymaster: My 32 Years in Espionage Against the West O. Kalugin (Basic, 2009)


    Special Tasks: A Soviet Spymaster, P. and A. Sudoplatov (Little Brown, 1994)

    Articles


    How Two Russian Defectors Helped the FBI, B. Denson, Newsweek (2016)


    Russian Defectors in Oregon, C. McGreal, Guardian (2015)

    Videos


    Lubyanka Federation: How the FSB Determines the Politics and Economics of Russia, Atlantic Council (n.d.)


    Washington Station: My Life as a KGB Spy, Y. Shvets, C-Span (1995)

    Primary Source Collections [All Wilson Center]

    Intelligence Operations in the Cold War


    The Mitrokhin Archive 

    The Vassiliev Notebooks

    *Wildcard Resource*

    KGB Members from Ahmed to Yuri, courtesy of Marvel Comics!

    • 1 hr 8 min
    “The Spies Who Came in From the Cold” – with Chris Costa and John Quattrocki at the Pritzker Military Museum & Library in Chicago

    “The Spies Who Came in From the Cold” – with Chris Costa and John Quattrocki at the Pritzker Military Museum & Library in Chicago

    Summary
    Chris Costa (LinkedIn; Website) and John Quattrocki (LinkedIn; Website) join Andrew to discuss coming in from the Cold War. They both had long illustrious careers in intelligence.

    What You’ll Learn
    Intelligence

    Two Cold War intelligence experiences

    Two perspectives on the U.S. intel. community in the 80’s & early 90’s

    Two reflections on the art and science of counterintelligence

    Two perspectives on serving on the National Security Council

    Reflections

    Career bookends 

    “Inadequate war termination”

    And much, much more…

    Episode Notes
    The Windy City Episode. 
    The Pritzker Military Museum and Library (PMML) in Chicago is well worth a visit. Located on Michigan Avenue overlooking Grant Park and Lake Michigan – there’s three additional attractions right there – you will not be disappointed. SPY teamed up with PMML to put on what would become this week’s episode.
    To discuss coming in from the Cold War intelligence landscape, Executive Director of SPY Chris Costa and AFIO board member John Quattrocki sat down for a panel discussion with Andrew. 
    Chris, a former intelligence officer of 34 years with 25 of those in active duty in hot spots such as Panama, Bosnia, Afghanistan, and Iraq, is also a past Special Assistant to the President and Senior Director for Counterterrorism on the NSC. John retired from the Senior Executive Service (SES - 4) as a Special Agent of the FBI with 19 years of operational experience against the Soviet Union/Russia, the Warsaw Pact, East Asia, Islamic extremist groups, and domestic terrorism. He also served on the NSC as the Director of Counterintelligence Programs.
    And…
    Pritzker Military Museum & Library’s mission is to “increase the public’s understanding of military history.” The International Spy Museum’s mission is to “educate the public about espionage and intelligence.” As you can see, then, in the military-intelligence-espionage national security continuum, we are pretty much as good a partnership as it gets. 

    Quote of the Week
    "The government has seen the counterintelligence (CI) resources as a kind of a human capital escrow account to draw on for other elements to the government. And in, so doing, we have started to lend our CI bodies to the private sector. So, we are providing indirect cost support to the private sector for their CI responsibilities, rather than causing them to acquit all their own CI responsibilities." – John Quattrocki
    "I was not entirely satisfied with the idea of being between wars, because we were trained as infantry men. Our job was to prepare to go to war. And then I said, you know what? I wanna fight against our adversaries on a different plane, multilevel chess, if you will. And that's what brought me into the intelligence business." – Chris Costa

    Resources
    Headline Resource

    Video of the live event featuring Chris & John at PMML in Chicago, YouTube

    *SpyCasts*

    "The FBI Way" - Frank Figliuzzi (2021)


    “Army Intelligence” –Mary Legere (2016)


    “The CI Professional” – John Schindler (2016)

    Beginner Resources


    Cold War Overview, Khan Academy (n.d.)


    HUMINT vs. Counterintelligence, Clearance Jobs (2020)

    Books


    To Catch a Spy, J. Olson (GUP, 2019)


    U.S. Army CI Handbook (Dept. of Army, 2013)


    Double Cross, B. McIntyre (Crown, 2013)

    Articles


    The Best Books on Counterintelligence, J. Olson, Shepherd (n.d.)


    An Anatomy of Counterintelligence, A.C. Wasemiller, SII (1994)


    Terms & Definitions of CI, FAS (2014)

    Website

    Counterintelligence, FBI

    Primary Sources


    National CI Strategy, 2020-22 (2020)


    The Spy Who Loved Her (1994)


    A Review of US CI (1986)


    Church Committee Report (1976)


    Summary of the “CIA Family Jewels” (1975)

    *Wildcard Resource*


    “Gerontion,” T.S. Elliott (1920)

    This poem is the origin of the phrase often associated with CI: “the wilderness of mirrors.”

    • 1 hr 7 min
    SPY@20 – “The Spy of the Century” – Curators Alexis and Andrew on Kim Philby

    SPY@20 – “The Spy of the Century” – Curators Alexis and Andrew on Kim Philby

    Summary
    Alexis Albion (LinkedIn) joins Andrew (Twitter; LinkedIn) to discuss Kim Philby using some of his personal belongings as prompts. This episode on the Soviet mole inside MI6 coincides with SPY’s 20th Anniversary.

    What You’ll Learn
    Intelligence

    Why Philby has been called “The Spy of the Century”

    Philby the man, the ideologue, the spy, and the traitor

    Philby’s corrosive effect on Cold War British and American intelligence

    The cultural blind spot that allowed him to hide in plain sight then ride a storm of suspicion 

    Reflections

    Psychological complexity and contradiction

    Social stratification

    And much, much more…

    Episode Notes
    The Cambridge Five are some of the most notable and notorious traitors in British history, and among them one man stands out in a way that has led some to call him, “The Spy of the Century,” MI6 officer Kim Philby. How did a quintessential Englishman who came from the “right” stock and went to the “right” schools become a Soviet mole? How did a genial chum come to haunt the corridors of British and American intelligence like a ghastly apparition? 
    Dr. Alexis Albion is this week’s guest and the Curator of Special Projects at the International Spy Museum. She was formerly on the 9/11 Commission Report, the World Bank and the U.S. Department of State.
    In this is a first of a kind podcast, Alexis and Andrew sat down with some of Philby’s personal belongings drawn from our world-leading collection of artifacts on espionage and intelligence. 
    And…
    Harold Adrian Russell Philby acquired the nickname “Kim” from the main character in Rudyard Kipling’s novel Kim, an orphan-boy-cum-spy in British India. Kim and Philby also have the Punjab in common, the novel begins in Lahore and Philby was born in Ambala, although the historic region was partitioned between Pakistan and India in 1947. The drive between Lahore and Ambala is roughly similar to that between Los Angeles and San Francisco.

    Quote of the Week
    "So why is he The Spy of the Century? Maybe the fact that he's not identified with any particular event or set of information [e.g., unlike Julius Rosenberg], but he's identified with this idea of betraying his Englishness is perhaps why he's been such a lasting figure because he almost is a touchpoint for the history of the 20th century and England. Great Britain's demise is a great power."

    Resources
    *Andrew’s Recommendation*


    My Five Cambridge Friends, Y. Modin (FS&G, 1994)

    A one-time KGB handler of the Cambridge 5 reflects on each of them as spies and as individuals

    *SpyCasts*


    Stalin’s Englishman: Guy Burgess – with Andrew Lownie (2016)


    The British the Joint Intelligence Committee – with Mike Goodman (2014)


    The Real History of MI6 – with Keith Jeffrey (2010)


    The Cambridge 5 – with Nigel West (2009)

    *Beginner Resources*


    Facts About Kim Philby, J. Hayes, Factinate (n.d.)


    Reading Material Culture [i.e., objects] (2020]


    India’s Partition in Pictures, BBC (n.d.)

    Books


    Spies & Traitors, M. Holzman (Pegasus, 2021)


    A Spy Among Friends, B. McIntyre (Crown, 2015)


    Kim, Rudyard Kipling (1901)

    Articles


    The Punjab Partition, S. Sultan, LSE (2018)


    Philby & Mistrust, M. Gladwell, New Yorker (2014)

    Documentary


    Why Was India Split into Two Countries, H. Roy, TED-Ed, YouTube (n.d.)


    MI6 Agent Turned Russian Spy, Philby, Timeline, YouTube (n.d.)

    Primary Sources


    Philby, I Spied for Russia from 1933 (1967)


    My Silent War, K. Philby (1967)

    The Disappearance of Kim Philby (1963) 

    Kim Philby (Peach): File 1 (1951-52)


    Constituent Assembly of India (1946)

    Primary Source Collections

    Indian Independence & Partition, UK National Archives

    *Wildcard Resource*

    Surnames & Social Mobility in England, 1230-2012

    So, you thought social mobility in England has changed significantly since the Norman Conquest almost 1000 years ago – well, yes, and NO!

    • 1 hr 15 min
    “Dealing with Russia” – A Conversation with Counterintelligence Legend Jim Olson

    “Dealing with Russia” – A Conversation with Counterintelligence Legend Jim Olson

    Summary
    Jim Olson (Website) joins Andrew (Twitter; LinkedIn) to discuss Putin and Russia. He had a 31-year career with the CIA including a tour in Moscow.

    What You’ll Learn
    Intelligence

    His views on Russia and its trajectory since the Cold War’s end

    His frank assessment of Putin and admiration for the Russian people

    His time in Moscow with 3 rotating KGB teams surveilling him

    His time as Chief of Station in the city of spies Vienna

    Reflections

    A “beautiful marriage” with American technology 

    Passing the generational baton

    And much, much more…

    Episode Notes
    “James Olson is a legend in the clandestine service,” not my description of this week’s guest, but that of former CIA Director and Secretary of Defense Robert Gates. Jim spent 31 years in the CIA, including tours in Moscow, Vienna & Mexico City, and rose to become Chief of CIA Counterintelligence. He is the author of Fair Play and To Catch a Spy. 
    He joined Andrew to speak about Russia. He speaks the language, spent time living and working in the country, where he was involved in one particularly daring operation that he shares with us in the episode, and he faced off against the organization that would go on to become the current SVR and FSB – the KGB.
    Jim has had Vladimir Putin on his radar for many a year, and he doesn’t pull any punches reflecting on his trajectory in this episode.
    And…
    Jim grew up in a small town in Iowa where, “we didn’t really follow international affairs, we joked among ourselves…if it didn’t affect the price of corn, we weren’t really interested.” My, how things changed for Jim.

    Quote of the Week
    "I have tremendous respect for the Russian people. They are long suffering. I've gotten to know many Russians. I've worked with a lot of Russians. I found them to be people who had a real soul. They had a human qualities that I could admire, but they were locked into a repressive regime that did not allow them to express any of those human sentiments that that they felt." – Jim Olson

    Resources
    Headline Resource


    To Catch a Spy: The Art of Counterintelligence, J. Olson (GUP, 2019)


    Fair Play: The Moral Dilemmas of Spying, J. Olson (Potomac, 2008)

    *SpyCasts*


    “The Spymaster’s Prism” – with Jack Devine (2021)


    “Russians Among Us: The Hunt for Putin’s Spies” – with Gordon Corera (2020)


    “The Corrupted State” – with Ilya Zaslavskiy (2016)


    “Putin’s End Game in Ukraine” – with KGB General (Retd.) Oleg Kalugin (2014)

    Beginner Resources


    To Catch A Spy with J. Olson, C-SPAN (2020) [9:44 minutes] 


    The Best Books on Counterintelligence, J. Olson, Shepherd (n.d.)


    Putin’s Revisionist History of Russia and Ukraine, I. Chotiner, New Yorker (2022)

    Books


    Putin’s People, C. Belton (Picador, 2022)


    Operative in the Kremlin, F. Hill & C. Gaddy (Brookings, 2015)


    One Soldier’s War in Chechnya, A. Babchenko (Portobello, 2008)

    Articles


    Former CIA Leader Said LinkedIn is Like a Candy Store to China, C. Burgess, ClearanceJobs (2022)


    New Documentary Series Explores Pollard Affair, H. Brown, Jerusalem Post (2022)


    J. Olson First Recipient of “The Spirit of Aggieland – 41 Award,” J. Adams, KAGS (2022)


    Ex-CIA Chief on Accused Chinese Spymaster, P. Christian, WCPO (2021)

    Videos

    To Catch A Spy with J. Olson, Houston World Affairs Council (2020)
    Primary Sources


    James Collins Oral History, US Ambassador to Soviet Union, 1997-2001 (n.d.)


    Jack Matlock Oral History, US Ambassador to Soviet Union, 1987-1991, (n.d.)


    Ukraine: Memo. On Security Assurances (1994)


    Belovezha Accords, Eyewitness Account of Former Belarus Soviet Leader (1991)

    *Wildcard Resource*


    What Classic Russian Literature Can Teach us about Putin’s War on Ukraine 

    Putin is a big fan of Dostoevsky – who underwent a mock execution & four years of hard labor in Siberia for belonging to a literary discussion group feared by the Tsarist autocracy. 

    • 1 hr 9 min
    4th of July Special: “The Wall of Spies Experience” – Espionage, Sabotage and Betrayal in America with John Gise

    4th of July Special: “The Wall of Spies Experience” – Espionage, Sabotage and Betrayal in America with John Gise

    Summary
    John Gise joins Andrew (Twitter; LinkedIn) to discuss the Wall of Spies Experience. It features over 200 stories of espionage and sabotage in America since 1776.

    What You’ll Learn
    Intelligence

    America’s first Spymaster

    The Founding Father of American Counterintelligence 

    The New Yorker who adopted a Southern accent so she could spy on the Confederacy 

    The escaped enslaved man who was described as a “walking order of battle chart” 

    Reflections

    Educating a workforce on its past

    Dreaming about history

    And much, much more…

    Episode Notes
    The Wall of Spies Experience features over 200 stories of espionage, sabotage and betrayal from American history. The physical wall is a private museum on an intelligence community facility, but the second installment of the Digital Wall of Spies has recently been released. Thus far we have the Revolutionary War and the Civil War, with WWI coming up next. 
    Whether you want to get a sense of the evolution of espionage in America, dork out on a particular historical period, or just have a browse – we are sure you will agree that this National Counterintelligence & Security Center (NCSC) sponsored exhibit is a welcome contribution to the public’s understanding of the history of intelligence and espionage.
    This week’s guest is John Gise, for whom the Wall of Spies was a labor of love. He has had a number of different roles across the US government, including a stint in Special Forces, but for now, spies from American history are with him while awake…and while asleep. 
    And…
    If you’ve ever wondered why you can’t visit the Statue of Liberty’s torch, you need to listen to the teaser John provides at the end of this episode on the next installment of the Digital Wall of Spies (we’ll give you a clue…it’s the opposite of White Jerry).

    Quote of the Week
    "We've now posted online…the digital revolutionary war spies, the digital civil war spies…And we're talking in the revolutionary war about 30 continental army spies and British spies…for the civil war, it's about 25 Union spies and Confederate spies. And many of those spies are also Scouts, right? Collecting information, going behind enemy lines, conducting reconnaissance missions and collecting intelligence for their superiors." – John Gise.

    Resources
    Headline Resource

    The Wall of Spies Experience (Digital) 
    *SpyCasts* 


    “Birthplace of American Espionage” - Spy Sites of Philadelphia (2021)


    George Sharpe and the BMI: A Conversation with Peter Tsouras (2019)


    Washington’s Spies: An Interview with Alexander Rose (2015)


    Spies, Patriots, and Traitors: American Intelligence in the Revolutionary War (2014)


    Intelligence and Espionage in the U.S. Civil War (2012)

    Books


    The Creation of American Military Intelligence in the Civil War, P. Tsouras (Casemate, 2018)


    Spies, Patriots, and Traitors: American Intelligence in the Revolutionary War (GUP, 2014)


    The Secret War for the Union, E. Fishel (Houghton, 1996)

    Articles


    Audacious Confederate Spies, G. Brockell, WaPo (2022)


    The Wall of Spies, M. Rosenwald, WaPo (2019)


    Intelligence Agency Unveils New Weapon to Deter Spies – A Museum, J.J. Green, WTOP (2019)

    Primary Sources


    John McEntee to George H. Sharpe [Charley Wright’s intel on location of Lee's army] 1863)


    Lincoln and the Baltimore Plot – Pinkerton Papers [Kate Warne] (1861)


    The Federalist Papers: No:64 (John Jay, 1788)


    Minutes of the Commissioners for Detecting and Defeating Conspiracies (1778-1781)


    Benedict Arnold Letter to John André (1780)


    John André Letter to Joseph Stansbury [for Benedict Arnold] (1779)


    Letter, George Washington to Benjamin Tallmadge (1779)

    *Wildcard Resource*

    Fraunces Tavern, New York City

    If you want to connect to Revolutionary War espionage, grab an ale, a seat by the fire, and muse (they also have a museum!)

    • 1 hr 8 min

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5
1.1K Ratings

1.1K Ratings

WestCoast HistoryBuff ,

Very interesting history first person

Great job getting real people to tell stories of their work in the midst of the big picture of historic conflicts

HendoHooligan ,

Interesting guests, BUT…

The host has the annoying habit of asking his guest simple question, easily understood by all, but then instead of shutting-up and letting the guest respond, he disrespects the guest and audience by reiterating the simple question several other ways, ‘leading the witness’ with potential answers, and sometimes giving his own response to the question before finally, 30-50 seconds after asking the initial question, finally allows the guest to answer.

Christ___ ,

One of my favorite podcasts!

Serious thanks for this podcast! It’s always one I look forward to as it’s discussions are enriching in content and pleasantly presented. I can’t say enough good things about this podcast! Thank you for the great content!!!

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