204 episodes

Most people don’t have time to read the books they want to. Each week join Steph (@stephsbizbookshelf), a life-long bookworm, as she brings you the lessons from the best non-fiction books she’s read. Steph will share the ‘three big things’ the books taught her, favourite quotes and actions she’s implemented since reading the book. If you have an ever-growing pile of half-read books on your bedside table, this podcast is for you. Steph's Business Bookshelf; doing the reading so you don't have to.

Steph's Business Bookshelf Podcast Steph's Business Bookshelf

    • Business
    • 4.8 • 5 Ratings

Most people don’t have time to read the books they want to. Each week join Steph (@stephsbizbookshelf), a life-long bookworm, as she brings you the lessons from the best non-fiction books she’s read. Steph will share the ‘three big things’ the books taught her, favourite quotes and actions she’s implemented since reading the book. If you have an ever-growing pile of half-read books on your bedside table, this podcast is for you. Steph's Business Bookshelf; doing the reading so you don't have to.

    How to Begin by Michael Bungay Stainer; how to change your life with a worthy goal

    How to Begin by Michael Bungay Stainer; how to change your life with a worthy goal

    If you enjoy this episode and want more bonus insights, big ideas, and recommendations to improve your own reading, check out the bookmark membership on Patreon.

    About the book

    We unlock our greatness by working on the hard things. Instead of doubting yourself, fearing you’ll make a mistake, and feeling like you need to play “small” so you don’t disrupt the status quo, start showing up for yourself so you can show up for the world. Don’t regret a life half-lived. Stepping up and pursuing your dreams is hard … and it’s exhilarating, and it’s important. Let me show you how to get clear, get confident, and start anything that matters.

    Source: https://www.mbs.works/best-books-training-for-coaches-leaders-and-mentors/how-to-begin-book/

    About the author

    Michael Bungay Stanier is the author of six books which between them have sold more than a million copies. He’s best known for The Coaching Habit, the best-selling coaching book of the century and already recognised as a classic. Michael was a Rhodes Scholar and plays the ukulele badly. He’s Australian, and lives in Toronto, Canada.

    Source: https://www.mbs.works/about/

     

    Big idea #1 — Set a worthy goal

    This is the bulk of the book. You go through this process a few different times to refine and improve your worthy goal.

    The first phase is purposely messy and probably quite dull. And you test this first draft of your goal on whether it’s thrilling, important, and daunting. 

    Round two of the iteration, has you adding some active words and verbs, before testing it again. A final refinement has you scoring the goal on how thrilling, important, and daunting it is, each out of seven. If the score is low (18/21), your goal needs a bit more work. You might need to add a word, or make the goal bigger, or maybe more constrained, or specific. And then voila, you have a worthy goal.

    Big idea #2 - The pain of reality

    As any good coach would, Michael has you taking a good, hard look in the mirror. The book takes you through examining your habits, your false starts, your patterns and behaviours, and your ‘mosquitoes’, as he calls them, that buzz around you and follow you around, whatever it is you try to do.

    This is an exercise in self-awareness and compassion, not self-loathing. You might go through this and realise some uncomfortable truths about your tendencies and things that may have set you back in the past, but it’s very much about being aware of them, and then being able to work with, or around, them this time.

    The next part is about painting a picture of your future, whether you do, or whether you don’t, see through this worthy goal. This is really useful to see the true opportunities and opportunity costs, of doing or not achieving this goal.

    One of my favourite exercises in the book is the idea of defining You2.0, which really hones in on what you want yourself to look like when you’re operating at your very best, versus operating at 85%. It’s such a great way of thinking back to situations where you really thrive, and what that looks like, to give yourself the boost that you can rekindle that again.

    Big idea #3 — Set yourself up to succeed

    As with any good goal setting book, there’s a big emphasis on setting yourself up for success. This includes having the right people around you; the people who are going to nurture you and you need a bit of nurturing, give you a bit of a kick or a nudge when you need it, or who you can aspire to and who can teach you. Ultimately the people who can both support and challenge you along the way.

    The other piece is around awareness. There’s a lot of activities in here around really knowing thyself, understanding where you’re likely to trip yourself up, and where you’re likely to not be as effective as you could be in reaching your worthy goal.

    Finally, thinking about experiments and practices. Michael talks a lot about how to take small first steps. Which isn’t necessar

    • 12 min
    What you should read in 2022

    What you should read in 2022

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    This week we're taking a gentle start to the year talking about the books on my reading list for this year, and how I'm rethinking my reading habits and goals.

    Here's some of the books I mention in the episode;
    How to Begin by Michal Bungay Stanier
    Atlas of the Heart by Brené Brown
    I Didn't Do The Thing by Madeline Dore
    This Working Life by Lisa Leong and Monique Ross
    How to Tell a Story by The Moth
    The Power of Regret by Daniel Pink
    Stolen Focus by Johann Hari
    Making Numbers Count by Chip Heath
    The Biography of Leonardo da Vinci by Walter Isaacson

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    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 10 min
    How We Read: Claire Hatton on royalty, leadership, and changing reading tastes

    How We Read: Claire Hatton on royalty, leadership, and changing reading tastes

    It's a December special with this bonus mini-series called How We Read, featuring conversations about the books that have stuck with us.

    This spin off series will continue in 2022 for members of the brand new Steph's Business Bookshelf Patreon, launching January 2022.

    In this episode of How We Read I'm talking to Claire Hatton about her top books of 2021, how she reads, and why 2021 has spurred some different genres of reading for her.
    Here's the books he talked about:
    1. Leading Edge by Holly Ransom
    2. Victoria, The Queen by Julia Baird
    3. Happiest Man on Earth by Eddie Jaku

    Plus, honourable mentions of Girl, Woman, Other by Bernardine Evaristo, Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens, Big Sister, Little Sister, Red Sister by Jung Chang, and Phosphorescence by Julia Baird.

    You can connect with Claire through LinkedIn and by checking out her podcast Don’t Stop Us Now, on your favourite podcast provider.

    Hey, have you subscribed to the bookmark newsletter? If you liked this, you might like my twice-monthly email with book reviews and ideas of what you should be reading, and listening to, next. Click here to subscribe.

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 24 min
    How We Read: Lisa Leong's existential musings and top reads of 2021

    How We Read: Lisa Leong's existential musings and top reads of 2021

    It's a December special with a bonus mini-series called How We Read, featuring conversations about the books that have stuck with us.

    This spin off series will continue in 2022 for members of the brand new Steph's Business Bookshelf Patreon, launching January 2022.

    In this episode of How We Read I'm talking to Lisa Leong about her top books of 2021, some existential considerations on what's really essential, and a few insights from her new book.

    Here's the books she talked about:

    1. The Mindful Therapist by Daniel J. Siegel
    2. The Art of Possibility by Rosamund Stone Zander and Benjamin Zander

    You can connect with Lisa through LinkedIn or Instagram, pre-order her new book This Working Life here, and listen to her podcast, This Working Life wherever you get your podcasts.

    Hey, have you subscribed to the bookmark newsletter? If you liked this, you might like my twice-monthly email with book reviews and ideas of what you should be reading, and listening to, next. Click here to subscribe.

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 24 min
    How We Read: Shane Hatton's top two books of 2021

    How We Read: Shane Hatton's top two books of 2021

    It's a December special with a bonus mini-series called How We Read, featuring conversations about the books that have stuck with us.

    This spin off series will continue in 2022 for members of the brand new Steph's Business Bookshelf Patreon, launching January 2022.

    In this first ever episode of How We Read I'm talking to Shane Hatton about his top books of 2021, how he reads, and how he weaved his way into a book club this year.

    Here's the books he talked about:
    Super Thinking: The Big Book of Mental Models by Gabriel Weinberg and Lauren McCann
    The Moment of Lift: How Empowering Women Changes the World by Melinda Gates

    Plus, an honourable mention of The Medici Effect, With a New Preface and Discussion Guide: What Elephants and Epidemics Can Teach Us About Innovation by Frans Johansson.

    You can connect with Shane through LinkedIn | Instagram | his website.

     

    Hey, have you subscribed to the bookmark newsletter? If you liked this, you might like my twice-monthly email with book reviews and ideas of what you should be reading, and listening to, next. Click here to subscribe.

    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    • 19 min
    No Cure For Being Human by Kate Bowler: how to find out what really matters in life

    No Cure For Being Human by Kate Bowler: how to find out what really matters in life

    Hey, have you subscribed to the bookmark newsletter? If you liked this, you might like my twice-monthly email with book reviews and ideas of what you should be reading, and listening to, next. Click here to subscribe.

    About the book

    It’s hard to give up on the feeling that the life you want is just out of reach. A beach body by summer. A trip to Disneyland around the corner. A promotion on the horizon. Everyone wants to believe that they are headed toward good, better, best. But what happens when the life you hoped for is put on hold indefinitely?

    Kate Bowler believed that life was a series of unlimited choices, only to find that she was stuck in a cancerous body at age 35. In her instant New York Times bestselling book, No Cure for Being Human, Kate searches for a way forward as she mines the wisdom (and absurdity) of our modern “best life now” advice industry, which offers us exhausting positivity, trying to convince us that we can out-eat, out-learn and out-perform our humanness. With dry wit and unflinching honesty, she grapples with her cancer diagnosis, her ambition, and her faith and searches for some kind of peace with her limitations in a culture that says that anything is possible.

    In facing down cancer, Kate searches for hope without cheap optimism, and truth with room for mystery. We are as fragile as the day we were born, and we will need each other if we’re going to tell the truth: Life is beautiful and terrible, full of hope and despair and everything in between, but there’s no cure for being human.

    Source: https://katebowler.com/no-cure-for-being-human/

    About the author

    Kate Bowler is a New York Times best-selling author, podcast host, and associate professor of the history of Christianity in North America at Duke University. After being unexpectedly diagnosed with Stage IV cancer at age 35, she wrote the New York Times best-selling memoir, Everything Happens for a Reason (and Other Lies I’ve Loved), which tells the story of her struggle to understand the personal and intellectual dimensions of the American belief that all tragedies are tests of character. Her TED talk on the subject has received over 9 million views to date, and on her popular podcast, Everything Happens, she talks with people about what they have learned in dark times and why it is so difficult to speak frankly about suffering.

    Source: https://katebowler.com/no-cure-for-being-human/

     

    Big idea #1 — Your best life now

    We’re obsessed with living well, optimizing everything, following people like Tony Robbins and those who promise us all the good things that will come from mastering our habits, enhancing our bodies, and that salvation is only a decision away.

    Kate says that “every year billions of dollars are pumped into a wellness industry defined by the theory that we can be perfected. We can organize ourselves, heal ourselves, budget ourselves, love ourselves, and eat well enough to make ourselves whole.”

    But of course, none of that is true.

    And it’s one thing being bombarded with all of those messages on a regular day, but what does that all mean when you’ve had a serious and potentially terminal health diagnosis? When spending time and the idea of productivity take on whole completely different meetings.

    It’s not really enough to live our best life. We need to think about it in a slightly different way in order to spend time well. And we need to think about the promises made by advertising and marketing and the so-called gurus, in a more suspicious way. Because maybe we can’t live our best life now, because we can’t control everything.

    Big idea #2 — Unfinished cathedrals

    Hang gliding, swimming with dolphins, and a world of other experiences have made their way into the experience economy; the things you must do before you die. We put them on bucket lists and it all suggests that life can be successfully completed.It’s much easier to count items than to know what counts.

    We t

    • 11 min

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