282 episodes

Hosted by Alex Green, Stereo Embers: The Podcast is a weekly podcast airing exclusively on Bombshell Radio (www.bombshellradio.com) that features interviews with musicians, authors, artists and actors talking about the current creative moment in their lives.

A professor at St. Mary's College of California, Alex is the Editor-In-Chief of Stereo Embers Magazine (www.stereoembersmagazine.com), the author of five books and has served as a Speaker/Moderator for LitQuake, Yahoo!, The Bay Area Book Festival, A Great Good Place For Books, Green Apple Books, and The St. Mary's College Of California MFA Reading Series.

Stereo Embers The Podcast Theme: Brennan Hester

Follow Stereo Embers The Podcast on Social Media:
Instagram: @emberspodcast
Twitter: @emberseditor

SUBSCRIBE FREE on Apple Music:
https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/stereo-embers-the-podcast/id1338543929?mt=2

Visit Alex Green: www.alexgreenonline.com

Stereo Embers: The Podcast Alex Green Online

    • Arts
    • 5.0 • 27 Ratings

Hosted by Alex Green, Stereo Embers: The Podcast is a weekly podcast airing exclusively on Bombshell Radio (www.bombshellradio.com) that features interviews with musicians, authors, artists and actors talking about the current creative moment in their lives.

A professor at St. Mary's College of California, Alex is the Editor-In-Chief of Stereo Embers Magazine (www.stereoembersmagazine.com), the author of five books and has served as a Speaker/Moderator for LitQuake, Yahoo!, The Bay Area Book Festival, A Great Good Place For Books, Green Apple Books, and The St. Mary's College Of California MFA Reading Series.

Stereo Embers The Podcast Theme: Brennan Hester

Follow Stereo Embers The Podcast on Social Media:
Instagram: @emberspodcast
Twitter: @emberseditor

SUBSCRIBE FREE on Apple Music:
https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/stereo-embers-the-podcast/id1338543929?mt=2

Visit Alex Green: www.alexgreenonline.com

    Stereo Embers The Podcast: Blake Morgan

    Stereo Embers The Podcast: Blake Morgan

    “Violent Desires"

    The Manhattan-born Blake Morgan is a musician, singer, executive, music producer, writer, record label owner, and activist. Raised by activist parents who were also writers—his mother is the poet Robin Morgan and his father is the poet Kenneth Pitchford--Morgan was immersed early on in the arts. By five he was at the piano playing Mozart and writing his own songs and the classical pianist path was being forged. But then he heard the Beatles and that path forked a different way. Educated at the United Nations International School in New York City and later Berkelee College of Music, Morgan graduated and hit the ground running, playing in bands and living the rock and roll lifestyle. He signed a seven-record deal with Phil Ramone’s fledgling label in '96, his debut album featured Lenny Kravitz singing back up,
    he toured the U.S. opening for Joan Jett and received tons of attention and critical acclaim. Morgan was crushing it, but he was mistrustful of the corporate label life and he got himself out of his contract.
    In 2002 he decided to form Engine Company Records, which became ECR Music in 2012. ECR has an associate publishing company and the music the label has released has ranged from punk to classical and in 2005, they had five albums in the Top 20. Meanwhile, Morgan kept cranking out great critically acclaimed solo albums. From Burning Daylight to Silencer to Diamonds in the Dark to his new one
    Violent Delights, Morgan’s music is a crunchy blend of melodic pop, introspective ballads and hook-laden numbers that are played with equal parts muscle and heart. And speaking of heart, Morgan’s is with artists and his political activism is specifically on their behalf. His Pandora takedown alone cost the company’s stock to fall 130 million in less than a day and signaled a major victory for musicians. He’s spent hours with Congress fighting for the rights of musicians which are always being marginalized especially in the digital age. Just Google his Art and Music Are Professions Worth Fighting For essay and you’ll get a sense of who this guy is. He’s one of the good ones. And this is a great chat.

    www.ecrmusicgroup.com
    www.bombshellradio.com
    www.alexgreenonline.com


    Stereo Embers The Podcast

    Twitter: @emberseditor
    Instagram: @emberspodcast
    Email: editor@stereoembersmagazine.com

    • 1 hr 22 min
    Stereo Embers The Podcast: Steve Michener (Big Dipper, Dumptruck, Volcano Suns)

    Stereo Embers The Podcast: Steve Michener (Big Dipper, Dumptruck, Volcano Suns)

    “All Going Out Together”

    It makes sense that the Massachusetts-born Steve Michener was in three seminal Boston bands: The Volcano Suns, Dumptruck and Big Dipper. The Volcano Suns were an outfit that Michener formed along with former Mission of Burma drummer Peter Prescott, he stepped in on bass with Dumptruck after their first album and he co-founded Big Dipper who were on the Homestead label before signing a big major deal with Epic. I’ve always loved Steve’s playing—he’s steady and strong and his baselines roll with power and groove. And the story today that he’s going to tell is about how he jumped into music and very slowly inched his way out. And I think the inching out is what’s the most fascinating thing here—sometimes people have the ability to look ahead and actually ask: What do I want and is this the best way to get it? Steve did that and he realized the things he wanted could not be attained while playing in a band. And so he stopped. Sort of. Then he really stopped. I’ll let him tell you his story—that seems fair, right? Anyway, Steve is a lovely guy and a voracious listener to music of all kinds—he may have inched his way out of rock and roll, but he’s kept a foot firmly in it on his own terms.

    www.bombshellradio.com
    www.alexgreenonline.com

    Stereo Embers The Podcast

    Twitter: @emberseditor
    Instagram: @emberspodcast
    Email: editor@stereoembersmagazine.com

    • 1 hr 12 min
    Stereo Embers The Podcast: Victor DeLorenzo (Violent Femmes, Night Crickets, Nineteen Thirteen)

    Stereo Embers The Podcast: Victor DeLorenzo (Violent Femmes, Night Crickets, Nineteen Thirteen)

    “Black Leather On The Inside”

    Victor DeLorenzo rose to global prominence as the drummer for the Violent Femmes—but he did really cool stuff before that and really cool stuff after. An actor since the age of five, after college DeLorenzo was a member of Theatre X, a pretty punk rock and way ahead of its time
    improv theatre group, who performed all over the world. He formed the Violent Femmes with Brian Ritchie in 1980 and although the group toured and recorded pretty exhaustively, DeLorenzo still stayed
    involved with Theater X. A minimalist drummer who comes armed with a spare kit and steel brushes, DeLorenzo is one of the most innovative players in modern music. His rhythms roll and swing with precision and finesse and his flourishes are infectious, powerful and stirring. After parting ways with the Femmes, DeLorenzo toured with the Velvet Underground’s Moe Tucker, put out a handful of marvelous solo albums, opened a recording studio, and formed a chamber rock duo called Nineteen Thirteen with cellist Janet Schiff. But that’s not all. DeLorenzo writes the Showoff column for Milwaukee.com, co-hosts the Frail Pagans radio show on WSUM with Mr. G and his new project is the Night Crickets with David J of Bauhaus and Love and Rockets.
    Their debut A Free Society is filled with dark, percussive beauty and lyrical invention and t’s buoyed by sneaky rhythms and brilliant melodic touches.

    www.victordelorenzo.weebly.com
    www.facebook.com/DougSeymourPhotography
    @dougseymourphoto
    www.bombshellradio.com
    www.alexgreenonline.com

    Twitter: @emberseditor
    Instagram: @emberspodcast
    Email: editor@stereoembersmagazine.com

    • 1 hr 22 min
    Stereo Embers The Podcast: Justin San Souci (The Matches) and Director Chelsea Christer

    Stereo Embers The Podcast: Justin San Souci (The Matches) and Director Chelsea Christer

    "Bleeding Audio And The Life Of A Match"

    I’m a Bay Area guy, so I remember in the late '90s when this group of kids from Bishop O’Dowd high school in Oakland got things going and started generating a buzz in this community as The Matches. And community is the key word here. The Matches found a way to connect with their audience in the most grass roots of ways—they were super accessible to their fans and were even known for playing acoustically before or after shows in the streets outside the clubs. Their music was hard to define—if one was feeling lazy, they would say they were pop punk, but they were way more than that. They were operatic, idiosyncratic, artistic and sonically adventurous in ways that were way ahead of their time. And they were nice people. And that means something. And the Matches meant everything to their fans. They still do. But the Matches' story is the perfect example of what happens when a rising career—and they were rising fast, signing with Epitaph, playing the Warped tour, touring with BIffy Clyro—gets derailed by an industry that got destroyed by the sudden accessibility of digital music. It started with Napster and it ended with record stores closing—and the in between? Well, it wasn’t pretty. And that’s where Chelsea Christer’s winning documentary Bleeding Audio comes in. A loving and intimate look at The Matches' march towards the mainstream and how that march ended up being a near miss at widespread success, Bleeding Audio redefines what it means to be a success in the music industry and it examines how a legacy—what bands leave for their fans—is something that has nothing to do with a price tag. Bleeding Audio is a very singular music documentary—there’s no fistfights, or tension or scandal—it’s just four really nice dudes playing music until playing music plays itself out. Why it played itself out is something the movie handles beautifully and you’ll have to see it to see what I mean, but spoiler alert: it has to do with money. Or, more specifically, not making it. And that’s the weird thing—they should have been making it. But there’s a series of reasons why they weren’t and the movie is a fascinating study of how a band that should have been financially solvent, weren’t, and at the dawn of their 30s, they were physically tired of living the way they were at the dawn of their 20s. This chat with Chelsea along with the Matches’ bassist Justin San Souci is a revealing and personal conversation about friendship, music, success and the unbreakable bond between anyone who knows what it means to bleed audio.

    www.bleeding-audio.com
    www.thematches.com
    www.bombshellradio.com
    www.stereoembersmagazine.com

    Stereo Embers The Podcast

    Twitter: @emberseditor
    Instagram: @emberspodcast
    Email: editor@stereoembersmagazine.com

    • 1 hr 14 min
    Stereo Embers The Podcast: Graham Parker

    Stereo Embers The Podcast: Graham Parker

    “The Songs Between The Docks and the Roads”


    Over the course of his career, the east London-born singer/songwriter Graham Parker has put out close to thirty albums and they’re all great. All of them—Whether its Howlin' Wind or Squeezing out Sparks or
    Another Grey Area or Deepcut To Nowhere or Cloud Symbols, every single GP album is a winner. Parker grew up a huge fan of the Beatles, Otis Redding, Sam Cooke and ska and reggae music and you can
    hear those influences coursing through his songbook. His compositions swing and shake and sway and groove with some of the most infectious
    pop hooks you’ll ever hear. Parker’s early life could be a series of novels—he hung out in the Channel Islands and Paris, hitchhiked thourhg Spain and Morocco and worked on the docks in Gibraltar. And you and I both know, there are stories in between those docks and roads and islands.
    Graham Parker has lived a life. And his life in music is equally as staggering as his adventures. With his band the Rumor he was produced by Nick Lowe, opened for Dylan, played on Top Of The Pops, had Top 40 hits and albums, toured Australia, been on labels as varied as RCA, Arista and Bloodshot and collaborated with folks like Bill Janovitz of Buffalo Tom, The Smithereens and Kate Pierson of the B-52s.

    And he’s stilt at it. His two new singles (“Humans Are The Mutant Virus” and '3-D Printer”) are all the proof you need that Parker is still at the top of his game. He’s practically peerless.

    www.grahamparker.net
    www.100-percent.co.uk
    www.alexgreenonline.com
    www.bombshellradio.com

    Stereo Embers The Podcast

    Twitter: @emberseditor
    Instagram: @emberspodcast
    Email: editor@stereoembersmagazine.com

    • 1 hr 34 min
    Stereo Embers The Podcast: Alan White (Yes, Plastic Ono Band)

    Stereo Embers The Podcast: Alan White (Yes, Plastic Ono Band)

    “Alan White Remembered: You’ve Got To Be Spot-On”

    In memory of Alan White (1949-2022), we're re-airing our chat with him from 2020.

    Being spot-on is what drummer Alan White says you have to be when it comes to being behind the kit for a band like Yes. One of the most technically proficient outfits in rock and roll history, Yes are musically precise and that’s why White has been behind the kit with them since 1973. One of the most formidable drummers in rock and roll for the last 50 years, the British born White started playing in bands when he was 13. And over the course of his career he played on records by George Harrison, Ginger Baker, Joe Cocker, Terry Reid and John Lennon. He played live with Lennon as part of the Plastic Ono Band at the Toronto Rock and Roll Revival Festival in 1969 and he also had a stint playing live with Steve Linwood. When he joined Yes he also had two other job offers at the same time with Jethro Tull and America. But White said no to them and yes to Yes. Pretty good move. He played on 17 Yes records, and established himself as one of the most innovative, intuitive and muscular drummers around. His playing is a deft combo of finesse and power, that’s as athletic as it is stylistic. Recorded live at the Las Vegas Hard Rock Hotel, back in July of 2019, Yes’s newest effort is called THE ROYAL AFFAIR TOUR, LIVE FROM LAS VEGAS and it’s a beast. A sterling collection that showcases not only the depth and scope of the band’s winning songbook, it features Mr. White tearing it up. In this chat he talks about the magic of Charlie Watts, whether or not you can master the drums and why you’ve got to be spot-on to be onstage with Yes.

    • 30 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
27 Ratings

27 Ratings

Altered! ,

A Truly Great Podcast!

Alex is crazy smart, thoughtful, funny and sensitive, and Stereo Embers is a warm digital room where his guests feel completely at ease - you get the feeling Alex brings out their very best. His guest selection is also incredible - he bounces back and forth between indie artists who deserve more attention than they receive to major label vets with fascinating stories to tell. Enthralling and informative. I will stay tuned permanently!

Lovemj4life ,

Love it!

It was a pleasant surprise! This show has way exceeded my expectations.
The interviewer, Alex, is a great host. He's funny, very knowledgeable about a great variety of music. Guests from underground legends to well known bands have been on the show
Music fans can learn a lot of the history of artists.

damngimbel ,

Let me tell you about....

Stereo Embers. Always great, interesting music makers. Alex might be the most well spoken music podcast host there is. Great stuffs.

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